100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 10, 1973 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, 3onuary-l Q, 19?:,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, January 10, 197:. THE MICHiGAN DAILY

full court
PRESS
Hawkeves lost . .
. in the Orr-zone
By DAN BORUS
ALTHOUGH THE TIME is certainly not ripe to speak of a
Michigan conquest ofthe Big Ten crown, the Wolverines have
displayed a great deal of maturity in their two Big Ten games.
Phases of the game previously left in a dusty corner of Crisler
Arena have found their way into the Michigan game plan.
Defense, which used to have the same value as yesterday's
papers, has been used as a potent weapon for the Wolverines
in the two pressure packed Big Ten square-offs thus far. Zone,
once a curse or something that described a football defensive
backfield, has become the word of the day for the high flying
Wolverines.
"We're playing team ball now," Coach John Orr says of his
new-look Wolverines, "and we're helping out much more than
we used to."
With the exception of really great college cage squads,
teams divide in philosophy along one of two lines-either
offensively or defensively oriented. And in the world of college
basketball offense is offense and defense is defense and never
the twain shall meet.
Michigan, of course, was a run-and-gun squad. Some fans
speak longingly of the "good ole days" when the Wolverines
would score 98 points and the opposition would score 94. In bad
years the point total was reversed. Sports Illustrated claimed that
Orr's idea of defense was a hook shot.
But if the last two games are any indication of the kind of.
basketball the Wolverines are going to play, then maybe thoughts
of championship are not far fetched at all.
For the first time in a long while Michigan players seem
aware that there are two ends to every basketball court and
that not letting the ball go in your own basket is almost as
good as putting it in the other one yourself. Part of this is
due to the newly fashioned zone defense the Wolverines are
displaying.
Basically a 1-2-2 the zone is perfectly suited for the material
the Wolverines start every game. Little Joe Johnson is quick
enough to play the point and Russell and Wilmore have forward
muscle and guard speed. Their position allows them to sag deep,
helping big men Ernie Johnson and Ken Brady.
The zone defense is also great for the eagerness Michigan
defenders display. "It keeps the big men out of foul trouble and
makes rebounding much easier," said Joe Johnson. His point
is :Well taken. The Wolverines, who averaged 16.4 personal fouls
per game last year, were whistled for infractions of the personal
nature only two, count 'em two, times in the first half of Monday's
contect. No Wolverine was in serious foul trouble.
The zone is particularly suited for a team with Michigan's
quickness and bulk. There are two ways to beat a zone-out-
passing it or overloading it. But to perform these tasks an
offensive squad hasto be quick and patient.
Monday night's game was a case for the adaptability and
power of Michigan's new defensive strength. Kevin Kunnert, who
is no longer the gawky player he was when he last visited Ann
Arbor, murdered the Wolverines in close, while the hot shooting
guards did their damage early from the outside.
"We got too cautious," said Orr. "Brady did not go out after
the guard in the corner as he is supposed to do. When he finally
did go out after the guard, we (in the first half) did' not sag in
enough on Kunnert."
"Actually Ernie just missed cutting him off by inches.
He (Ernie) is real quick and the zone works to his advantage."
In the second half the tinkers got together and sagged
and fronted Kunnert, while Johnson and Wilmore did a bang-
up job on sharpshooter Rick Williams. Williams, who killed
the Wolverines last year in Ann Arbor with 15 field goals, had
but one foul shot in the second half.
Playmaker Joe Johnson feels that the zone has helped the
ball club. "You know," he says, "I think the zone makes us
better on offense, too. We're making fewer mistakes so we're
not worried when we get the ball." Though the Wolverines did
turn the ball over 14 times, much of that could be attributed to
the exhaustive (Saturday-Monday playing) and the flu.
Considering the rough and tumble nature of the last two
opponents, the Wolverines have maintained the rebound advan-
tage. This shows the effectiveness of the zone. Usually in a zone
the defensive team can be out-rebounded since the offense is
charging and the defensive squad member has responsibility for
an area, not a man. This combination has resulted in mediocre
squads securing many offensive rebounds as the defense forgets
to screen out.
But the Wolverines have looked like ball hawks and they
want that ball.,
However, before you reserve a ticket to St. Louis for the
NCAA championship, a word or two of warning. One: this is a
tough league. With the exception of Northwestern, there are

no real patsies. After two tough games, the Wolverines must
travel Saturday to East Lansing and the Spartans are looking
tougher and tougher.
Secondly, the Wolverines are still not a completely polished
product. They still have trouble with the full court press and are
a little too sloppy on some plays.
But the signs remain good. As Johnny Orr says, "If we can
keep the opposition below 65 points, we can beat anybody."

Warriors

el

s

Page Seven
ye again
slain ;Lenny Wilkens and Austin Carr
SICOea sscored eight points in the third
CHICAGO-Chicago's Chet Walk- period as Cleveland cut the spread
er became the 18th player in Na- to 77-76 entering the final quarter.
tional Basketball Association his- ;

By The Associated Press
MILWAUKEE - George Frazier'
poured in 16 of his 21 points inj
the second half last night, leading
fourth-ranked Marquette to its 81st
straight Milwaukee Arena college
basketball victory, 82-77 over Chi-
cago Loyola.
Larry McNeill and Maurice Lu-I
cas each scored 20 points for the
Warriors, 11-0 this season. Loyola
slipped to 7-4 despite 22 points by
Ernie Lewis and 23 by Nate Hayes.
Marquette stretched a six-point
shalftime lead to 12 points with
eight minutes to play and still
led 74-63 with 4:37 to go before1
Loyola rallied.
Marquette went into delay pat-
terns with four minutes left, but
Loyola forced several turnovers
and cut the gap to 78-75 on Paul
Cohen's tip-in with 39 seconds left.
But the Warriors pulled it out on
two clutch free throws by Allie
McGuire with 14 seconds left and
two more by Marcus Washington
with four seconds to go, off-setting
a basket by Lewis.
* * *
Terps terrorize
COLLEGE PARK, Md.-Len El- I
more scored 19 points and grabbed1
17 rebounds as unbeaten and sec-
ond-ranked Maryland thrashed Vir-
ginia 93-74 in an Atlantic Coast
Conference basketball game last
night.
The Terps, who have won 14l
games in a row dating back to last1
season, raced to a 38-22 halftimej
lead and Virginia was unable to1
get closer than 10 points behind
the rest of the way.
Barry Parkhill, Virginia's back-I
court star, was held to two points

daily

sports1
NIGHT EDITOR:7
ROB McGINNf
-the lowest of his career, under
the close guarding of Bob Bo-
dell and Jim O'Brien.
Tom McMillen scored 17 points'
for Maryland, which won its 21st
straight at home, and freshman
guard John Lucas had 20 points'
and nine assists.
With Maryland ahead 29-18 late
in the first half, Lucas assisted onI
three fast break baskets by thec
Terps and sank a shot of his own.
The Cavaliers, now 6-4, includ-
ing 2-2 in the ACC, spurted mild-s
ly midway through the secondc
half behind the shooting of fresh-
man Wally Walker and Gus-
Gerard to pull within 35-45.
But McMillen, who sank five freet
throws to extend his streak from
the line to 21 without a miss, then
followed his own missed shot to
sink a basket and dropped in two
foul shots to make it 59-45.
Maryland is now 2-0 in the ACCc
and meets third-ranked North Caro-I
lina State at home Sunday in ar
battle for first place. The Wolf-C
pack has a 1-0 conference recordI
but must play Duke Friday night.I
Walker finished with 23 pointsC
for Virginia and Gerard had 19.
The Cavaliers were outrebounded
53-25.

tory to score 15,000 points last
night, leading the Bulls to a 126-
110 victory over the Philadelphia
76ers.
The loss was No. 39 of the year
for the 76ers who have won only
four games.
Philadelphia madena game out
of it until early in the third
quarter when Bob Love and his
16 points put the game out of
reach.
The trio of Walker, Love, and
Garfield Heard once again led
the Bulls' forces, this time with
67 points.
Heard, who collected 27 key
points, flipped in 19 in the second
quarter and closed out with 12
shots out of 16 from the floor.
Philadelphia, beset with injuries,
suspensions, and numerous turn-
overs, fell hopelessly behind early
in the third quarter when the com-
bination of Love and Clifford Ray,
took its toll.
Fred Carter led Philadelphia
with 27 points.
Braves bounce
BUFFALO-Buffalo's front lineI
of Elmore Smith, Bob McAdoo and
Bob Kauffman combined for 64
points and outrebounded the entire
Cleveland team in leading the
Braves to a 106-102 National Bas-
ketball Association victory over the
Cavaliers last night.
Smith scored 22 points, pulled
down 19 rebounds and handed
out a career-high eight assists.
McAdoo had 22 points and 16
rebounds while Kauffman, who
missed two games with an ankle
injury, had 20 points and 10 re-
bounds. The Cavaliers managed
only 43 rebounds as a team.
The Braves jumped to a 12-2
lead and were in front all the way.
They led 55-42 at halftime, but

Hawks soar
ATLANTA-A three-point play by
Jim Washington with 2:36 remain-
ing helped Atlanta to a 120-114 Na-
tional Basketball Association vic-
tory over the Houston Rockets last
night.
Until Washington's shot gave At-
lanta a seven-point advantage,
neither team had led by more than
five points all night. The score was
tied 18 times.
Walt Bellamy and Pete Mara-
vich sank 26 points each for At-
lanta, Herm Gilliam had 20 and
George Trapp added 19.
Houston's high scorers were
Rudy Tomjanovich and Jimmy
Walker with 25 each.
The victory moved Atlanta to
second place in the NBA's Central
Division, five and a half games
ahead of the Rockets, who are
third.
* * *
Islanders blipped
UNIONDALE, N.Y.--Mike Corri.
gan, Serge Bernier and Vic. Ven-
asky scored for Los Angeles in the
opening four minutes of play last
night and the Kings hung on for a
3-2 National Hockey League victory
over the New York Islanders.
Corrigan scored first, netting
his 19th goal of the season at
1:29 of the opening period. Ber-
nier made it 2-0 with his 13th
goal at 2:58, then Venasky scored
less than a minute later and the
Kings led 3-0 with just 3:44 gone
by.
HRP Mass Meeting
STEERING COMMITTEE
ELECTIONS
THURS. 7:30-
MICHIGAN UNION

Daily Photo by DAVID MARGOLICK
FLAMBOYANT FORWARD ERNIE JOHNSON (30) snuffs a lay-in
attempted by Iowa cornerman Neil Fegebank in Monday night
action. Sources after the tilt have revealed that as the unfortunate
Hawkeye left Crisler Arena his forehead was emblazoned with
the words "Wilson Jet."

BAY: 'MY GREATEST VICTORY'

Alatme n

pin

By JIM ECKER
Welcome back to the wonderful
world of Wolverine wrestling.
When we last left you, Michigan
stood on the verge of grappling
greatness. Today they are one
giant step closer to that goal.
Penn State brought its four-
year dual meet unbeaten streak
into Crisler Arena Dec. 13: The
once mighty Nittany Lions were
sent whimpering home, tails
neatly tucked between their legs,
after absorbing a 31-6 thrashing
from Coach Rick Bay's boys.
Last Saturday the Wolverines
shellacked the Ohio State Buck-
eyes by an identical 31-6 tally
in their first Big Ten meet.
Michigan's overall record is a

spotless 4-0.
Coach Bay called the unexpect-
ed cakewalk against Penn, State
"my greatest victory as a wres-
tling coach, ever." Michigan's
triumph marked the 300th suc-
cess in the proud history of Wol-
verine wrestling.
The impetus for Michigan's
recent wrestling success has
been leadoff man Jim Brown, the
muscular sophomore from Akron,
Ohio.
Brown's last two dual-meet
outings have turned into pinning
affairs. Against Penn State, for-
mer high school champ and
Eastern runnerup Tom Teagar-
den fell after 6:57. In Columbus
Saturday, Jack Low's shoulders

Lions,
fondled the mat 16 seconds ear-
lier than his Penn State counter-
part.
A win by fall counts six team
points in collegiate wrestling, the
equivalent of two regular three-
point decisions. So even if Mich-
igan had dropped the two match-
es following Brown's perform-
ances, the score would still be
knotted. But that has not been
the case.
Rich Valley cleared the mud-
dled 126 lb. picture with a couple
of solid showngs. Valley surpris-
ingly pinned Nittany Lion Nor-
man Palovesik 1:02 before the
final horn. Valley's effort, cou-
pled with Brown's six-point suc-
cess, crushed Penn State's spirit
and opened the flood gates.
Two-time Big Ten champ Jerry
Hubbard provided Michigan with
two superior dual meet decisions
good for four team points apiece.
He wiped out Penn State's Mike
Mousetis 14-1 and last Saturday
coasted to a 10-0 whitewashing
over John Brewer in unfriendly
St. John's Arena.
Gary Ernst looked solid in his
two tussles. The Saline heavy-
weight closed out the resounding
Penn State success by decision-
'ing Ira Lubert 9-3.
Captain Mitch Mendrygal re-
mains unbeaten after two vic-
torious decisions. The Big Ten's
158 lb. champion is a strong,
shrewd and efficient wrestler
who rarely makes a mistake.
Michigan dropped but four of

Professional League Standing s

BucksY
20 combined matches against the
Penn State and Ohio State grap-
plers. Saddled with one setback
apiece were 142 pounder Rick
Neff (Ohio State); 167 pounder
John King (Penn State); 177
pounder John Ryan (Ohio State);
and 190 pounder Dave Curby
(Penn State).
This could be the year Mich-
igan seriously challenges Mich-
igan State for the Big Ten cham-
pionship and battles the Spartans,
Iowa State and Oklahoma State
for the NCAA Championship.
NBA
Buffalo 106, Cleveland 102
Atlanta 120, Houston 114
Chicago 126, Philadelphia 110
New York 116, K.C.-Omaha 115 (OT)
NHL
Los Angeles 3, New York Islanders 2
COLLEGE
Maryland 93, Virginia 74
Indiana 80, Miami (Ohio) 68
Ohio U. 87, West Liberty 70
Marquette 82, Loyola 77
Northern Michigan 80, Calvin 53
New Term Special
REDUCED RATES
BILLIARDS and
TABLE TENNIS
TODAY & TOMORROW
2 DAYS ONLY
MICHIGAN UNION
-

Ev

SPECIAL! HOT CHOCOLATE
eryone Welcome!
GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR
WEDNESDAY
F A' 8-10 p.m.

m orw

West Conference
Room, 4th Floor
RACKHAM

Montreal
Boston
N.Y. Rangers
Buffalo
' Detroit
Toronto
Vancouver
N.Y. Islanders
Chicago
Minnesota
Los Angeles
Atlanta
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
St. Louis
California

NHL
W L
24 61
26 10
25 13
23 12
18 16
14 20
11 25
4 33
West
24 14
19 15
19 18
ii 19
17 18
17 18
14 18
"r 24

T
10
7
6
6
6
4
2
5
v
6
6
7

Pts
58
55
53
53
42
314
28
12
50
43
42
41
40
40
35,

GF
161
175
153
155
124
128
123
77
149
129
125
1ll
142
138
110
109

(A
92
119
105
114
127
134
184
193
113:
111
126
122
138
144
12.9
16,.

PACIFIC DIVISION
WN L
Los Angeles 30 10
Golden State 27 12
Phoenix 21 21
Seattle 13 32
Portland 11 32

Pet. GB
.750 -
.692 2%
..500 10
.289 19j2
.256 20'

EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC DIVISION
WN L Pct. GB
32 7 .821 -
ork 34 10 .773
12 30 ' .274 211/
lphia 4 39 .090 30

Boston
New Yi
Buffalo
Philade

Baltimore
Atlanta
Houston
Cleveland

CENTRAL DIVISION
W L
23 17
24 30
17 24
13 30

Pet. GB
.575 -
.539 1
.420 6x4
.305 11%/

NBA

WESTERN CONFERENCE
MIDWEST DIVISION
W iL Pct. GB
Milwaukee 31 13 .705 -
Chicago 28 14 .669 2
Kansas City 21 25 .457 11
Detroit 18 23 .439 11'a
R

THE TIME OF MAN
A 50 minute color film produced with
the cooperation of the American Mu-
seum of Natural History

11

(

CREATIVE REFORM
SHABBAT SERVICE
Cricle-Creative Poetry-Torah Study
Wine and Chalah

if
you
see
news
happen
call
16-DAILY

I

'1^

Sponsored by ZPG
Admission Free

Fri., Jan. 12
7 & 9 P.M.

I

I

8 p.m. FRIDAYS
HILLEL LIBRARY 1429 Hill Street

I

Women's Potential and Higher Education"
SCHOOL OF ED: G350-Section 002
In this course, women will examine their potential within the context
of the University. Topics covered will include: why you came here, how you
want to use your education, and what you can do now, within the University,
to evolve your potential.
The necessary skills for self-understanding, creative autonomy, and leader-
ship (empathy, communication, and motivation) will be stressed. The end
nnni is n mn. ;n nannt nn cczrtive oriinal worman and student.

UGLI multi-purpose room
Avoid the HI-FI RIP-OFF!
Buy direct from
D1 EST
IFI
WHOLESALERS
Box 567
Ellsworth Industrial Park
Downers Grove, Illinois 60515
(312) 852-5885

Been Zapped!
.. by not gaining enough
information from what
you read?
by a lot of anxiety at
exam time?
..with lousy grade s
when you really thought
you were doing well?
..by some kind of study
or reading problem?
If so, call the Reading
Improvement Service for
information. Registration
for a 6 week reading ef-
ficiency and Study Skills
Classes, Jan. 12.
$6.00 for six hours.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan