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January 10, 1973 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1973-01-10

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page sue

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, January 10, 1973

I

T H-I C I A N D I L

Wednesday, January 10, 1973

FOCUS
the other side of learning
Short term & weekly groups with trained leaders to
explore issues of growth and identity.
AVAILABLE THIS SEMESTER--
Sex Roles Workshop
Art Workshop
Massage Workshop
Self-Awareness for Students in Helping
Professions
Couples Group
Workshop on Men's Issues
Workshop for Divorced People
Workshop on Black Women's Issues
Consultation to living units-dorms, fraternities,
sororities, communes, coops, etc. available on request
Conse to a Group Orientation Meeting
Wed., an. 10th or Thurs., Jan. 11th
AT 7:30 IN 25 ANGELL HALL
FOR INFORMATION CALL BART-764-8437
OR ANN, JAY, OR JOHN-764-9179
FOCUS-sponsored by Counseling Services, Office of Student
Services and Project Outreach

King named nominee
for prestigious trophy

Special To The Daily
Former Michigan graduate and
Olympic gold medal winner Cap-
tain Maxine "Micki" King has
been announced as one of the 10
finalists in the running for the
prestigious James E. Sullivan
Award. The winner of the award
is generally acknowledged as the
outstanding American amateur ath-
lete of the year and will be an-
nounced January 15, 1973.
Captain King's selection was
made public at the recent National
Convention of the Amateur Ath-
letic Union (AAU) in Kansas City.
She was nominated by both the
Interservice Sports Committee, as
the outstanding military athlete of
1972, and by the AAU Joint Men's
and Women's Diving Committee.
King, a captain in the Air Force, is
the first active duty service wo-
man to be nominated for the Sul-
livan Award.
Eight other gold medalists
w e r e nominated wrestlers
Wayne Wells and Dan Gable,
marathon runner Frank Shorter,
800 meter runner Dave Wottle,
swimmers Melissa Belote and

Mike Burton, hurdler Rodney
Milburn, and speed skater Diane
Holum. Bronze medal winner
Larry Young (race walk) rounds
out the nominees.
Mark Spitz, winner of seven gold
medals in swimming, was not elig-
ible for the award due to a rule
prohibiting an athlete from win-
ning the award twice. Spitz cop-
ped the honor in 1971.
Should Captain King win the
award she would become the
fifth female recipient since the
award was initiated in 1930.
Among the laurels of the former
Pontiac, Michigan resident's il-
lustrious 18-year career are: ten
National AAU diving titles, three
collegiate , titles, Pan American
Games medals, and selections as
both AAU All-American diver and
water polo goalie.
Captain King has also made
the finals of every AAU diving
championship since 1963 with the
exception of 1969 when she -was
injured. The injury came in the
1968 Olympic games where she
broke an arm on one of her last
dives, still going on to finish fourth.

Gifte
By DAN BORUS
There are a couple of things
they just don't talk about at the
University of Minnesota - foot-
ball, the brawl with Ohio State
and losing in basketball. While
the first two have scarcely been
mentioned at all, the rough and
rumble Gophers have found
themselves with one black mark
against their record.
Unfortunately for the seventh
ranked men from the North the
loss came last Saturday night
against the Iowa Hawkeyes and
plummeted the defending Big
Ten champions to thenbottom of
the pile in the Big Ten.
Surprisingly, t h e Gophers
lost the game on the boards. "In
a nutshell," said Iowa coach
Dick Shultz, "our outrebounding
them summed up the game."
Coach Bill Musselman, vilified
for his conduct during last sea-
son's incident and the unnatur-
al emphasis' he places on win-
ning, concurred: "This was the
first time we have been outre-
bounded. We just didn't react
well."
But before anyone starts ban-

BREWER, BEHAGEN LEAD WAY
f Gophers eye

ti tie

ishing the Gophers to burrow the
basement burrow, another look is
in order.
THE GOPHERS, who last sea-
son existed on the talents and
determination of five men
known as the "Iron Five" are
well stocked and the preliminary
favorite for the Big Ten circuit.
All five of last years anti-heroes
are back, joined by brawlers
Ron Behagan and Corky Tay-
lor, who missed last season aft-
ter a disagreement with Ohio
State's Luke Witte took an un-
pleasant turn.
Led by the Big Ten's Most
Valuable Player Jim Brewer,
who ironically was not listed on
any All-Big Ten teams, Clyde
Turner, a 17.1 points per game
forward, and Dave Winfield, the
Gophers boast a strong front
line. Dick Schultz of Iowa calls
them the most physical team he.
has played this year. The Golden
Rodents, as they are unaffection-
ately known in Columbus, led the
Big Ten in rebounding at the
conclusion of the non-conference
campaign.
Last season, the Gophers were

disles of the Mussel-nan plin
for d fease. They slowly work-
ed tie bAl for the high percent-
age shot and forced the unbal-
anced shot while on defense.
Musselman seemed to have an
aversion, in fact, to putting
the ball into the air. Opponents
taunted the Gophers with cries of
"boxing, not baskets." But Mus-
selman held to his slow-down
game..
This year, while the same
Musselman "good defense" phil-
osophy remains, the Gopher of-
fense has opened up quite a bit.
Scoresin the range of 120 points
have been reached on at least
two occasions by the rampaging
Gophers, prompting one coach to
refer to them as Golden Boars.
Even at guard the Gophers are
a physical team. Last season 6-3
Bob Nix and 6-5 Keith Young
handled the ball-control duties.
This campaign, however, the Go-
phers have been going with a
one guard offense, even though
there has been plenty of help on
the bench in case Musselman
needed backcourt help.
YOUNG suffered a severely
bruised thigh and did not return
to action until the ill-fated Iowa
contest. Generally Nix h a s
played the point with Winfield,
Behagen, Brewer, and Turner
in the forecourt.
With an appearance somewhat
similar to the goon squad, the
Gophers have thus far had re-

m rk ly b a I a n d e d scor-
irg. F ch of t'e eight regular
players h,)s had a twenty point
game. Rebounding is just as
strong and evenly spread with
Brewer the leading ball retriever
with a 17.6 caroms per game.
And if that is not enough to
frighten the rest of the league,
Musselman has something else
up his sleeve. Actually, he's too
big to hide up anyone's sleeve,
but 7-0 freshman Tommy Bark-
er, who demolished the state of
Texas on the maplewood for
three seasons, is more than
enough to give the residents of
the Big Ten a severe migraine.
Like many teams, the Gophers
break from the gate fast and let
up in the middle of the game, al-
lowing the opposition to threaten
their lead. The championship
game of the Far West Classic
was typical of their sometimes
lackadaisical play.
Brewer, Turner, and Behagen
thumped the Oregon front line
convincingly and the Gophers
rolled to an 18 point lead mid-
way through the second half.
But they lapsed on defense and
Sam Whitehead brought the
Beavers back to within two. The
Gophers held on for an 83-80 vic-
tory. Musselman, however, was
not exactly pleased at the trend.
"If we play like this in the Big
Ten, we won't win a game." he
said.
No one, however, is anticipat-
ing that.

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PRICES IN THIS AD GOOD
TH RU SAT., JAN. 13, 1973.
Meijer reserves the right to limit
sales according to specified lim-
its. No sales to dealers, institu-
tions, or distributors.

4

4

SHOPPERS'

MEN'S WORK SHOE SALE!

Choose from any style work shoe in
our Shoe Department and save $2.00
off the purchase price with this cou-
pon. Pictured are just a few of the
many styles available. Boots or shoes
-long wearing qualities.
OUR REG. $9.96 to $21.76 pr.
$796 6$ 7
PR. I1 PR.
WITH COUPON WITH COUPON

SPECIALS
NESCO
PORTABLE
O Ideal for students.
O Holds a 1=/2 lb. load... avg. time 12
minutes. 43/4 gal. cap.
* Thermoplastic tub, unbreakable, light-
weight, rustproof, with handies and drain
valve.
OUR REG. $36.88
88
ONLY HAND WRINGER
ATTACHMENT
ONLY $10.97
JEWELRY SMALL APPLIANCE DEPT.

VA S H E

4

MODEL NO. N-181-1

e

Daily Photo by TERRY McCARTHY
MOUNTAINOUS MINNESOTA PIVOTMAN JIM BREWER (52)
yanks down an errant shot in last winter's contest with Michigan.
Ken Brady (15) and John Lockard cautiously look on. "Brew,"
the Big Ten's MVP a year ago, heads an awesome aggregation
from Minneapolis which will be tough to beat for the league crown.
Wolfpack grab third slot,
B ruins remain atop heap

4

MEN'S
WORK SHOE

ENGINEER
BOOT

ack only. Sizes 7
r12.
Our Reg. $13.96
$1196 OU
WITH COUPON

MEN'S MEN'ST
WORK OXFORD WORK SHOE
Leather uppers. Sizes $ 6-inch leather uppers. 09

By The Associated Press
North Carolina switched places
with Marquette yesterday while
UCLA and Maryland continued to
play "me and my shadow" in The
Associated Press' major - college
basketball poll.
North Carolina State (9-0)
T p-.

L

7 to 12.
Our Reg. $9.96

WITH COUPON

Sizes 7 to 12.
Our Reg. $11.76

WITH COUPON

SHOE DEPT.

FOOD CLUB
Cottage Cheese

FRESH
FROZEN

TuAf

TIPE
LAUNDRY DETERGENT

1.1
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.1
7.]
8.1
9.'
10.1
11.]
12.
13.
14..
15.
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18.:

UCLA (47)
Maryland
North Carolina St.
Marquette
Missouri
Long Beach St.
North Carolina
Minnesota
Vanderbilt
Houston
Providence
San Francisco
SW Louisiana
Alabama
Jacksonville
Indidana
Kansas St.
Florida St.

10-0
9-0
9-0
10-0
11-0
11-1
12-1
9-1
11-1
10-2
7-1
10-1
7-1
7-1
10-2
8-2
9-2
8-3

940
767
689
656
495
394
392
364
252
203
188
156
146
130
98
80
52
47

moved into third place with 689
points while Marquette (10-0)
dropped to fourth with 656 in bal-
loting by sports writers and
snortscasters.
UCLA (10-0) remained a unani-
mous first-place choice while
Maryland (9-0) stayed a solid sec-
ond choice. UCLA got all 47 first-
place votes and 940 points while
Maryland got 767 points.
BIllbard
The women's basketball team
will be practicing tonight through
Thursday from 6:30 to 8:00 at
the Intramural Building. All un-
dergraduate women are more
than welcome.
* * *
The following meetings will be
held this week for intramural
athletic managers:' Fraternity
and Residence Halls divisions,
tonight, 7:30, Sports Services
Bldg., Independent d i V i s i o n,
Wednesday night, 7:30, Sports
Services Bldg., Graduate divi-
sion, Wednesday night, 9:00,
Sports Services Bldg., Women's
division, Thursday night, 7:30,
Barbour Gym.

a
9
4

s

s

16 oz,
wt.
carton

3 C

C 30 lb. 54
wt-b
lb3. box

Tie-St. John's, N.Y. 8-2 47
20. Louisville 10-2 34
Others receiving votes, listed alpha-
betically: Arizona, Brigham Young,
Cincinnati, Daily Libels, Iowa, Mar-
shall, Memphis St., MICHIGAN, New
Mexico, Oklahoma, Oral Roberts, Penn,
St. Joseph's, Pa., Santa Clara, South
Carolina, Southern Cal, washington.

49 oz.
wt.
box

4
f

WITH COUPON

WITH COUPON

SAVE Y2 c1
with this coupon N
loward the purchase oft 0
C OOD CLUB SMALL or LARGE CURD
iCOTTAGE CHEESE 23c
16 oz. wt. carton WITH COUPON 3
Prices good Tues. Jan. 9 thru Sat. Jan. 13, 1973

SAVE 2 ,
with this coupon I
toward the purchase fi
en's Work Shoes $2 off
YOUR CHOICE
Our Reg. $9.96 to $21.76 WITH COUPON I
I Prces aocd Tues Jan. 9 thru Sot. Jan. 13, 1973 3
i- {-! 1lIl d". ' ' :-'.? l' f n " J i k :EP7+

Ii
IS~ SAVE 4OC0~t
a SAVE 40cwith this oupono
toward the purchase of$
jc Co NI
I E . . . . 49c I
LAUNDRY DETERGENT
49 oz. wt. box WITH COUPON I
SPr ces good Tue. Jan. 9 thru Sat. Jan. 13, 1973 3
> °>. i ,i . . .. ..., DEPT.

SIGN UP NOW !
MUSIC LESSONS
ANN ARBOR MUSIC MART will soon
be starting Class Lessons in Guitar,
Flute, Banjo, & Drums.
$12.00 for 6 week's lessons

A

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