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February 02, 1973 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1973-02-02

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Fridav. February 2. 1 C)TI

PageTwoTHE ICHGAN AIL

Frudr jI ~ r-u riy G11O7 ~lAJ I-.7

:.7

POST VIETNAM ERA

ixon,

Heath

discuss

By AP and Reuters
WASHINGTON - President
Nixon welcomed British Prime
Minister Edward Heath to the
White House yesterday urging
that they seek "a common policy
for this area of peace" which he
envisions in the post-Vietnam
world.
In welcoming ceremonies Nix-
on said the end of the Vietnam
war means that "now we can
turn to tasks that are enormous-
ly important."
The President and Heath
talked on a wide range of topics
including the European Common
Market and U. S. trade, and the
upcoming European Security
Conference.
The prime minister is the first
head of government to visit
Washington since Nixon began
his second term, and it is his
first meeting with the U. S. chief
execcitive since Britain joined
the Common Market.

At the White House, Heath re-
ceived full military honors, in-
cluding a 19-gun salute and a
serenade from army trumpeters,
playing "Rule Britannia" from
the White House balcony.
He said his visit came at an
auspicious moment, so soon after
the Vietnam peace accord, which
was signed in Paris on January
27.
"We in Britain have admired
the stead-fastness with which
you have pursued this objective
and the courage with which you
have made very difficult deci-
sions," he declared.
Joined by presidential assist-
ant Henry A. Kissinger and Sir
Burke Trend, Britain's Cabinet
secretary, Nixon and Heath con-
ferred for almost two hours and
discussed Vietnam, progress in
improving western relations with
the Soviet Union, the Helsinki
talks on European security,

rorld
preparations for negotiations for
the withdrawal "of forces from
Central Europe and U. S. rela-
tions with the enlarged Common
Market.
For Nixon, the meeting was
the opening of a period in which
he will place greater emphasis
on relations with- Europe-ne-
glected somewhat during Ameri-
can preoccupation with Vietnam.
The first two days of talks be-
tween the prime minister and
Nixon were described by White
House Press Secretary Ronald
Ziegler as very frank and infor-
mal - indicating that the two
leaders came to grips with the
hard bargaining that lies ahead
between the United States and
Europe over trade and economic
differences.
The United States had a large
trade deficit last year and is
seeking better terms in its deal-
ing with the European commun-
ity.
President Nixon assured Heath
that he felt the expanded Euro-
pean Common Market, including

rade
Britain, would have a close
partnership with the United
States in the years ahead.
Heath, speaking later at a Na-
tional Press Club reception,
warned that there were still very
real grievances about U. S. trade
barriers.
"You have your complaints
about some of our European
trade practices," he told his
mainly American audience. "We,
for our part, have very realI
grievances about U. S. trade
barriers.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-1
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier (campus area); $11 local mall
(in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).s
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6v50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other,
states and foreign).

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AP Photo
PRIME MINISTER EDWARD HEATH of Great Britain reviews the
Honor Guard yesterday during ceremonies on the south lawn of
the White House. Heath was in Washington for a round of talks
with President Nixon.
U.S. AIR WAR:
Laos kept secret
WASHINGTON (P) - On his first continuing operations "at the re-'
day as secretary of defense, Elliot quest of the royal Laotian govern-
Richardson asked what many ment."
Americans have been asking for Although Richardson himself in-
years: Why the secrecy surround- dicated he has strong doubts about
ing the U. S. air war in Laos? the long-standing U. S. policy of
The new Pentagon chief in a carrying on bombing of Laos be-
news conference Wednesday didn't hind a partial cloak of secrecy, it
say to whom his question was di- appears unlikely he will be able
rected, but it seemed obvious he to remove the wraps without White
was referring to the White House House consent.
and, more specifically, to the f-
fice of presidential adviser Henry The indication has been that
Kissinger. touchy diplomatic considerations
Despite the Vietnam cease-fire, involving the Laotian govern-
U. S. planes have hit Communist ment - which once considered it-
positions in Laos for four conse- self neutralist - are responsible
cutive days. All the Pentagon wil for the refusal to talk about U. S.
say is that American aircraft are 'operations there in any detail.

Violence intensifies
in Northern Ireland
By The AP and Reutcr
BELFAST-A grenade attack yesterday on a Catholic workmen's
bus, killing one man and injuring several others, heightened the pros-
pect of a bloody war between the Irish Republican Army and Pro-
testant extremists.
The grenade ambush in the quiet Belfast suburb of Cherry Valley
climaxed a three-day toll of six persons slain and at least 15 wounded
in hit-and-run raids. Most of the victims were Catholics.
Construction worker Paddy Heenan, a 40-year-old father of five
children, died in yesterday's grenade attack.
Police said one of the assailants limped across the road in front
of a bus. As the driver slowed down two men jumped from the side-
walk and lobbed a fragmentation grenade through a window. Metal
splinters cut down all 10 men in the bus while the attackers fled in
a stolen auto.
The Ulster Volunteer Force, the only Protestant extremist or-
ganizgtion to be outlawed, later claimed its men staged the ambush.
The grenade assault came only a few hours after the IRA warned
from its Dublin headquarters it would unleash "ruthless retaliatory
action" for Catholics slain by Protestant assassins.
The Ulster Defense Association vowed in turn it would smash the
IRA if it began a war of vengeance. It said the guerrillas' proclama-
tion was "a virtual declaration of war."
The wave of killings coincided with a sudden upsurge in bomb-
ings -- 20 in the last two weeks. The province's British administrator,
William Whitelaw ,termed the slaughter "murder madness."
Some military sources said tougher measures by the army against
the vigilantes were likely. But they stressed that with British plans
for Northern Ireland expected to be announced in March, security
forces would have to tread carefully to avoid giving Protestant extre-
mists any excuse to take to the streets.
The republic's prime minister, Jack Lynch, was expected to seek
summit talks with British Prime Minister Edward Heath when Heath
returns from a visit to the United States.

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