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January 27, 1973 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-01-27

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, January 27, 1973

Page Fight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

E

New Watergate

BUDGET CUT:
testimony heard NxETC
Nixon

drops OEO

i

WASHINGTON (,) - The jury
heard for the first time yester-
day that two former Nixon cabi-
net members knew large sums of
money were being turned over
to one of the Watergate trial de-
fendants. The government says
the money went to finance politi-
cal espionage against Demo-
crats.
U. S. District Judge John
Sirica read most of the testimony

given out of the jury's hearing
Tuesday by Hugh Sloan, treasur-
er of the Nixon campaign, who
resigned after the airrests in
Democratic headquarters last
June.
Sloan had testified that Jeb
Magruder, a top campaign offic-
ial, had turned over a total of
$199,000 in cash to G. Gordon
Liddy, who is on trial for con-
spiracy, burglary and electronic

espionage. Sloan said that for-
mer Atty. Gen. John Mitchell
and former Commerce Secre-
tary Maurice Stans authorized
Magruder to pay the sum to Lid-
dy - although not the specific
amount. Stans and Mitchell
worked in Nixon's campaign.
The judge ,saying he felt it his
duty to bring out the facts that
attorneys did not elicit, said of
Sloan's testimony "much of it is

important .
bearing on
bility before

. and may have
Mr. Sloan's credi-
the jury."

i " ., v V A v t

New supervisory committee
faces old problem in Vietnam

Judge Sirica also said the gov-
ernment has the right to recall
Sloan to question him further
and turned down two mistrial
motions offered by Liddy's law-
year, Peter Maroulis.
Devan Shumway, who was di-
rector of public affairs for the
Committee for Re-election of the
President, issued a statement
saving there had been misinter-
pretations of Sloan's testimony.
"At no timerdid Mr. Mitchell,
Mr. Stans or Mr. Magruder au-
thorize expenditures for other
than legitimate campaign pur-
poses," Shumway said.
The jury also heard testimony
from a former White House sec-
retary, Kathleen Chenow.
Another witness, the manager
of a photo shop in Miami Beach,
Fla., testified he did a rush or-
der of developing and printing
photographs for Bernard Barker
on June 10 last year and that the
pictures turned out to be copies
of Democratic National Commit-
tee correspondence.

(Continued from Page 1)
question, Ash said 323 of the 389
people whose jobs will be abol-
ished in the three offices will be
transferred to other agencies. This
means only 66 will actually be cut
from the federal payroll.
The Federation of American
Scientists said it would fight the'
abolishment of the Science andr
Technology Office."
The group, which claims a mem-
bership of 4,500 scientists, said in
a statement it believed the White
House decision reflected the fact "

th t the advisory group "have been
calling the shots as they see
them."
"Their very objectivity makes
the administration question their
reliability," the federation said.
The National Aeronautics and
Space Council, created in 1958, is
no longer needed, Nixon said, be-
cause the "basic policy issues in
the U.S. space effort have been
resolved and the necessary inter-
agency relationships have been
established."

AP Photo
Edward G. Robinson dies
"Tough-guy" Edward G. Robinson died last night at the age of 79.
The cause of death was not known. This picture was taken in 1969
at his Hollywood, Calif. home.
QUESTIONS, ANYONE:
LSA starts POINT
telephone system

SAIGON (/P) - The International
Commission of Control and Super-
vision (ICCS) takes over from a
three-nation body with a similar
name which, during 18 years in
Vietnam, did little controlling or
supervising.
And, though the new group is
larger, with a wider framework
for policing the peace, its man-
date appears to contain the same
obstacles which doomed its pre-
decessor toanineffectual role.
The old International Control
Commission - ICC was made up
of India, Poland and Canada,
three nations of divergent ideology
which had to agree unanimously
before officially condemning any1
violation of Geneva accords.
Even if they could all agree-
and they seldom did - they could
do nothing more than issue a re-
port. Authorities in North and
South Vietnam often restricted the
group's movements or withheld
information.
It was so bad, at one point, that
the late author Bernard Fall re-
ported watching an aircraft car-;
rier unloading U. S. warplanes at
Saigon while an ICC officer from
India remarked:
"Yes, but officially we have not
been informed of the presence of
the aircraft carrier.
The new ICCS, made up of Po-
land, Canada, Hungary and Indo-
nesia, also must agree unanimous-
ly on its decision. It, too, has no
police powers other than to blow
the whistle.
There are some' significant dif-
ferences, however.
While the old ICC had only 14
designated base points in all Viet-
nam, the new ICCS will have 45
fixed inspection points and offices
in the South alone.
The original body had provision
for its thin staff to move about,
but it had to rely on sometimes
inadequate transport and reluctant
host authorities. The newer ver-

~there's
thru
Classified
THIS WEEKEND
Saturday-9:30 p.m.'
the pre-U.S. tour
appearance of
Sunday-9:00 p.m.
KODAI ROAD
NO CHARGE
the HALFWAY INN

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907 N. Main 769-7935

Members of the new ICCS can with only one or two signatures.
flag violations, on a minority-re- These had only public relations
port basis with fewer formalities. value for one side or the other.
Historians contend that although In 1962, for example, the Ca-
the ICC has been moribund in re- nadians and the Indians reported1
cent years, its original tasks of that North Vietnam was building
supervising prisoner exchange and up for intervention and sending
refugee movements were largely supplies into the South through
successful. ILaos. At the same time, the Poles
But it soon ran into trouble and the Indians noted that the
and issued hundreds of reports Americans were supplying pro-j
hibited support to South Vietnam.

PARTICI PATE
in University committees
14 Graduate and Undergraduate
Student Seats Are Vacant
*U-Cellar Board (3)
*Research Policies (1)
* University Coucill (2)
" Teacher Awards (1)
" Civil liberties (1)
*Proper Role (1)
*Student Relations (2)
" University Relations (2)
APPLY NOW
SGC OFFICE AT
3-X MICHIGAN UNION
Ask far a P.I.B. Form

(Continued from Page 1)
The POINT system is not meant
to replace the various campus in-
formation agencies, "but to com-
plement the services of the variety
of agencies" around Ann Arbor,
Vietnam

Rodgers explains.
POINT will run on an experi-
mental basis until April 15. At
that time the program will be
evaluated. If the system is suc-
cessful, Rodgers hopes it "will bej
implemented on a wider-scale"
throughout the University.
The POINT numbers are:
-POINT 1 (763-0390), which tells
more about the POINT system

I. ----'

fivhtingi

A I vrYouA'ednyim'o..

and University mini-courses. AbLaiiiiv.1c cv1; c.
n U-PONTym7i-courses.hichof-sion is- to have 1,160 officers and
POINT 2 (763-0392), which of- men moving around the country in
fers information on such topics as American helicopters f r e s hIy
preclassification and spring/sum- marked with white stripes.
(Continued from Pop 1) mer registration. -__
Laos" and an end to the shooting -POINT 3 (763-0394), which will
in Cambodia, too. tell you about transfer credit poli-
There was no indication as to cies, summer opportunities and KU N DALI N I
whether Kissinger had told North study abroad.
Vietnamese negotiators that the --POINT 4 (763-0396), which ex-
United States would keep up bomb- -0
ing of the Ho Chi Minh Trail and plains pass/fail, late changes in "O G A
other targets in Laos and Cam- academic programs and the in-
bodia after the Vietnam cease-fire. complete grade. There will be classes in
The United States still has nearly -POINT 5 (763-0398), which in- Kundalini Yoga given
500 bombers, fighter bombers and cKuesdiformtionongtansfrrin
gunships based in Thailand and eludes iformation on transferrig
ready to carry on military opera- to and from LSA and credit for
tions, if ordered to do so. non-LSA course work. Bloomington, Ind. yoga
<:>:::><::::><:::::>:::: > < :>o<><;> >ashram at the OFFICE
OF R ELIGIOUS
GALERIE JACQUES AFFAIRS (3rd floor
NOW SHOWING Michigan Union) THIS
MODERN ORIGINAL GRAPHICS WEEKEND.
by FRENCH ARTISTS F
G. BRILLANT and J. DeBUTLERF
2dThrough SAT.: 10 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
2208 Packard Truh
Feb. 18th SUN.: 10 A.M., 1 P.M.
Phone: 769-6787 12-7 P.M.

\

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . a t! w o m ,

/

i 1i

I am trying
to bribe you
I.anger,
defeat.
,.9 jorge
Luis
borges
That's mostly what you'll
find if you commit your
life to the millions in the
Third World who cry out
in the hunger of their
hearts. That...and fulfill-
ment too...with the
AN
Over 1,000 Catholic mission-
ary priests at work mainly in
the developing nations.
We've been called by many
names - "foreign dogs"
"hope-makers".. . "c-pital-
ist criminals"..."hard-nosed
realists"...
Read the whole story in our
new
a1 G-PAGE
BOOKLET
Tells it
like
it is
Columban Fathers "
15t. Columbans, Neb. 68056
I Please send me a copy of your
booklet. No strings.
1 1

.I

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