100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 24, 1973 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, j6iuary 24, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven'

Wednesday, Ja~iuary 24, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven
3 .1

Sports of The Daily

Celtic-led

East

stars

demolish

How Big George .

. .

.. .smoked Joe

By BOB McGINN
STUNNING. Shocking. Astonishing. One of the greatest upsets
of the century.
These are the words being used throughout the world to
describe Monday night's Heavyweight Championship fight held in
the unique site of Kingston, Jamaica. And they all fit, to a
degree.
But George Foreman's obliteration of champ Joe Frazier is
really just one of a long line of incredible reversals in prize-
fighting history.
The seedy old fight men still reminisce about James J.
Braddock's decision over Max Baer in 1935. And if you have
forgotten about the then Cassius Clay-Sonny Liston bout in
Miami in 1965, you don't have much of a memory. Even
Monday night's victim, Frazier, earned his title by whipping
that supposedly invincible foe, Muhammad A'.
So to lay to rest the ever-present choruses of "fix," Foreman
gained his niche in ring annals the same way others had before
him.
How did it happen? If you're at all interested, you'll un-
doubtedly read so many "expert" theories in the next few weeks
that it'll make your head spin. The sportswriters will all have
their say, as well as every ex-pug sporting two cauliflower ears
and, perhaps, even Norman Mailer.
They'll argue about Frazier's inactivity (eight rounds in two
years), and the Ali backers will smirk with glee as they discourse
on the effect they think their man's punches had on Frazier two
winters ago.
But all of that can be nothing more than conjecture. A
machinelike rock of a man has been destroyed in less than two
rounds, and the only thing one can surmise is that there
must be extraordinary rower in the two gloved hands of
24 year old George Foreman.
The pre-fight odds were 3 -1 for the champion, and that
seemed about right. Sure, Foreman had knocked out 34 of his
37 foes, but of the so-called "contenders" around, he had faced
only George Chuvalo, the Canadian trial horse. There was also
talk about the 1968 Olympic heavyweight champ's amazing pro-
ficiency at making the heavy bag fly. Liston could do it, but
not many more.
Thus, the fight people conceded that Foreman could punch,
but few took his chances seriously. It has been a boxing axiom
for decades that in order to be good, you must fight other boxers
who have a reputation, whether they are 10 years past their
prime or not. The evidence that Frazier underrated Foreman is
overwhelming.
Frazier's big mistake
A notoriously slow starter, Smokin' Joe strangely leaped
to the attack at the opening bell. Maybe he wanted to dis-
courage his opponent immediately, or maybe he wanted to
dispel any doubts that he had not recovered from the All
fight. Whatever his motive, it was just plain stupidity.
Foreman has had nearly a dozen first round Ko's a factor
which is meaningful, to fight regulars. He must have smiled when
Frazier struck the first blow after a matter of only a few
seconds. As Foreman said before the fight, "Frazier's got no
style. He just comes on in, and I'll know right where to find him.
Before I've always had to do the chasing."
So before the champion even had a chance to.initiate his
mauling tactics, he was on the canvas from a vicious right hand.
He was ,to fall five more times before the end. "I knew Foreman
was big and strong, but I didn't realize he was that strong,"
Frazier said.
Afterward Frazier said grimly that he'd be back, and
somehow you have to believe him. His preparation for the Ali
bout had been nothing short of fanatical, as was his per-
formance in the ring. The man deserved a rest, not a two
year sojourn.
Fighting nobodies like Terry Daniels and Ron Stander
hardly constitute a title defense. Frazier's reign was another
nail in boxing's half-closed coffin.
Whether Smokin' Joe can ever reach the heights of his
emotional self again will dictate his future in the ring. He has
been humiliated. Maybe now, whether he meets Foreman again
or Ali in a fight which will bring a vastly reduced purse, Frazier
will get back to the business of fighting.
It would seem at this point that the title door has now
swung open for Ali. Should he fight the champ, Foreman appears
to be made to order for him, since he is probably slower than
Frazier and doesn't yet possess Joe's proven ability to go 15
tough rounds.
If Ali doesn't take Foreman lightly, and if he still has the
capacity to dance the distance, he would likely win a decision.
But if Ali presents Foreman with the opportunity to un-
leash his heavy artillery, the young Californian could go down
in history before he's through as the most powerful puncher
of them all.
Even if Ali defeats Foreman, he must still fight Frazier to

erase the memories of that night in 1971. Feeling as I do that
Frazier will rebound with that iron-willed determination, and
knowing Ali's feelings of revenge, I see their second engagement
as the genuine Fight of the Century.
The heavyweight division hasn't had three such quality
fighters since Rocky Marciano, Jersey Joe Walcott, and Ezzard
Charles were around in the early 1950's. It might be worthwhile
to savor it while we can.

CHICAGO ()P) - Boston's Da
Cowens and John Havlicek co
bined for 29 points to lead the Ea
to a relatively easy 104-84 victo
over the favored West in the 23
NBA All-Star game last night.
The West, despite the crow
pleasing efforts of flashy Na
Archibald, was thwarted in a t
for an unprecedented third su
cessive All-Star triumph by t
second-half power of the hustli
East squad, which now leads
the series 15-8.
Although the West trailed onl
50-45 at halftime after blowin
East does it
EAST

ve
m-
ast
ry
rd
vd-'
ate
ry
uc-
the

alsports
NIGHT EDITOR:
BOB McGINN

West
last-minute withdrawal because
of "personal reasons," the West
was outmuscled under the boards
by the bruising East strongmen.
J a b b a r' s replacement, Wilt
Chamberlain, was effective in the
early going but was on the side-
lines much of the time in his rec-
ord-matching 13th All-Star game
appearance.
For a while in the first period,
Archibald and Sidney Wicks of
Portland teamed in a shooting
spree that led the West to a 19-9
edge.
* * *
Red Wings ie
PHILADELPHIA - Alex Delvec-
chio scored the 450th goal of his
National Hockey League career-
only the seventh player to reach
that plateau-as the Detroit Red
Wings held on for a 4-4 tie with
the Philadelphia Flyers last night.
Delvecchio's goal came at 8:20
of the second period on a power
play and tied the game at 2-2.

DeBusschere
Havlicek
Cowens
Frazier
Maravich
Hayes
White
Wilkens
Hudson
Marn
Bradley
Black
Unseld
Kauffman
Totals

G
4
6
7
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
1
4

AP Photo
EAST MEETS WEST and one of the twain shall be beat(en). Dave Cowens (18) of the Boston Celtics
strains for a rebound snared by Los Angeles Lak er center Wilt Chamberlain (13) in last night's NBA
All-Star Game in Chicago. The East throttled a surprised West squad 104-84.
BIG TEN'S BEST:
Sche mbechler honojred

WEST
G
Wicks 4
Haywood 5
Chamberlain 1
Archibald 6
West 3
Dandridge 2
Lanier 5
Bing 0
Walker 1
Goodrich 1
Scott 0
Thurmond 2
Love 2
Hawkins 1
Totals 33
Attendance-17,527

F
1-2
2-5
1-i
0-0
0-0
2-2
0-0
1-2
2-2
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
1-2
10-16
F
5-5
2-2
0-0
5-5
0-0
0-0
0-0
2-2
2-2
0-0
0-0
0-0
2-2
0-0
18-18

ng
in an early 10-point lead, the third
quarter shooting of Cowens and
y Havlicek opened up a 12-point
g lead at 73-61.
Thereafter, the East steadily
took command and by midway in
the fourth quarter had iced the
T game with a 16-point bulge at 92-76.
9 Archibald, the 6-1 sensation of
14 Kansas City-Omaha, led the West
10 with 15 points and his magical ball-
handilng delighted the Chicago
10 Stadium crowd of 17,527.
6 Without Milwaukee Bucks su-
6 perstar Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, a
4
4
4
104
T4
13
11
17:.. \
10
2
4
6
2 en ntrseItyue.

CHICAGO ()-Bo Schembechler,
who directed co-champion Mich-
igan to 10 successive victories be-'
fore a closing upset by Ohio State,
yesterday was named winner of
the first Big Ten Football CoachI
of the Year Award.{
Schembechler, whose Wolverinesj
finished with a 10-1 record-mar-
red only by a tough 14-11 loss to
the Buckeyes-was selected for the
new honor in a poll of news media
covering the Big Ten.
The trophy was presented to
Schembechler by commissioner
Wayne Duke at a press recep-
tion last night also attended by
the nine o t h e r conference
coaches.
Duke lauded Schembechler's
38-4 record during his four-season
regime at Michigan commending
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Maryland 100, Long Island 73
Lehigh 48, Colgate 46
Lafayette 61, W. Virginia 60
Marquette 76, Northern Michigan 55
Kansas St. 77, Kansas 68
Baylor 76, Arkansas 70
Hillsdale 92, Spring Arbor 64
Texas Tech 65, Rice 51
ITexas A&M 69, Texas 64
Oral Roberts 87, Pan American 68
NHL
N.Y. Islanders 8, California 1
Philadelphia 4, Detroit 4
Minnesota 5, Los Angeles 5

it as "one of the all-time best
ever over that time span."
Instead of rebuilding in 1972,1
after losing 15 starters, Schem-
bechler fashioned the Wolverines'
into a club which finished No. 7
in the final Associated Press poll.
It marked the third time in Bo's
four seasons, Michigan won out-
right or shared the Big Ten title.
The honoring of Schembechler
climaxed a day-long annual meet-
ing of conference coaches at which'
the mentors discussed problems of
last fall and new rules for the 1973
season.
Over the winter, Alex Agase
shifted from Northwestern to suc-
ceed retired Bob DeMoss at Pur-

due; Indiana's Johnny Pont re-
placed Agase at Northwestern; Lee
Corso went to Indiana from Louis-
ville, and Denny Stolz became
head coach at Michigan State,
supplanting his retired former boss,
Duffy Daugherty.

1-1/4" GOLD" DECALS on black
background Can be applied to front
and rear windshields, books, etc.

LAST CALL!
MIXED
BOWLING LEAGUES
SIGN UP NOW
UNION LANES
OPEN 11 A.M. MON-SAT.

Also available: 3/8" 3-character
rubber stamps. These are the only
two items we are handling at this
time. Either item: $1.00 ppd for
any 3-letter set-(all Greek, all
English, or mixed). Sorry, no
COD's.
BATTEN ENTERPRISES
P.O. Box 128
St. Albans, N.Y. 11412

HILLEL AND MIDRASHA COLLEGE OF JEWISH STUDIES
PRESENT
DR. ZVI GITELMAN
Asst. Prof. of Political Science, U-M
SPEAKING ON
"Soviet ,Immigrants in Israel"
Soviet emigration policy-who leaves, when and why (not);
Israeli immigration policy-who gets what, whe.re and why
(not); Israeli politics and the Soviet immigrants, from Soviet
Jews to Israelis.
THURSDAY, Jan. 25 at HILLEL, 1429 Hill

Ism.AME EEm

OfAI'll-U5

'rAV

present in a BACH CLUB BENEFIT
JUAN SERRANO
HILL AUDITORIUM-8:30 THURS.
FLAMENCO GUITAR
Jan. 25-Tickets $2.50 at the door
or Ann Arbor Music Mart, Discount Records (S. Univ.)

1

m

m

14

INTRODUCE YOURSELF TO

PHI

,
>.1,.

THETA

SUNDAY, JAN. 21-2-5, 7-10 P.M.
MONDAY-THURSDAY, JAN. 22-25-7-10 P.M.
1437 WASHTENAW AVE.
" COMPLETELY REMODELLED HOUSE
* FULL SOCIAL AND ATHLETIC PROGRAM
CALL FOR RIDES-761-5310

' ;
\i

SHOP THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
UNTIL 9:00 P.M.
SALE
for 3 doys only...
Young Men's Pants
SAVE 25%
Thursday through Saturday,
January 25-27. . .substantial
savings on a selected group
of jeans and casual pants from
our regular stock. . .some
permanent press fabrics, some
wrinkle-resistant doubleknits,
some cuffed and uncuffed
flares. Stock up on them now
at savings! 29 to 36 waist sizes.

16
P

O

I

I

WANT A GOOD SUMMER JOB?
... If your parent's income does not exceed $12,000.
... If you can show substantial Financial need through
Financial Aid application.
If you will be a full time student in the fall.
Then apply for the Spring/Summer Work Study Program.
Jobs are available in Ann Arbor, with the Detroit and New
York Urban Corps, also in California, Ohio, Florida, Pennsyl-
vania and elsewhere.
APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE FEBRUARY 1
APPLICATIONS DUE MARCH 1
For applications and more information-Inquire at 2284 SAB
763-4128

PISSED AT THE PSYCH DEPT?
s Want to psychoanalyze a behavior modifier?
* Unhappy with statistics and lab courses in psych?
s Desire better counselling f or psych concentrates?
WELL, DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT!
COME TO THE NEXT MEETING OF THE
Psych 1ergraduate

I

.%

-1

WHAT DO NAPOLEON, MATA HARI, AND

ssociation

.;:::a:.
.::::::::ai.
?ii:
...
:...

ii

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan