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January 24, 1973 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1973-01-24

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, January 24, 1973

Boilers, Hoosiers

sc

By DAN BORUS
London flu may be sweeping the
nation, but in Indiana fevers are
really ragin'g. The cause, however,
is not a virus or any other for-
eign bodies, but something close
to down home-basketball.
After last week's go-rounds in
the Big Ten, the temperature in
the Hoosier state is about to break
the thermometer. Perched atop the
standings of the conference are the
state's two teams.
Purdue, by virtue of its stun-
ning upset of Michigan and its
laugher in West Lafayette against
Wisconsin Monday night, and In-
diana, which soundly whipped
defending champ and resident
bad guys Minnesota Saturday and
the Spartans of Michigan State
Monday, have vaulted into the
lead in a race for conference
supremacy which has already
produced more surprises than
even the most experienced Big
Ten watcher had forecast.
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Picked in the middle of the
bunch both squads possess un-
blemished records of 4-0. And
what's worse for the other eight
members of the conference, they
give little sign of abating the tre-
mendous pace they are setting.
Of the two squads, Indiana's last
victories were the most impressive.
Dominating the Big Bad Gophers to
an extent that wasn't thought pos-
sible the Hoosiers swarmed all over
Minnesota, coming away with a
highly impressive 83-71 victory.
Although John Ritter was high
for the men from Bloomington with
23 markers, the damaging factor
according to all accounts was fresh-
man guard Quinn Buckner.
"He controlled the tempo of the
game," Minnesota mentor Bill
Musselman lamented. "He was the
guy who really hurt us."
Buckner, who had considered
matriculating at the ivy covered
halls of Michigan before choos-

ing the oak covered campus of
Bloomington, was simply superb
in his floor game. The Gopher
guards just couldn't finesse with
Buckner and havoc resulted.
Buckner found the big men in-
side when the Hoosiers needed a
bucket. In one stretch, the blazing
Hoosiers fired in twelve straight
points against a Minnesota team
supposedly weaned on defense.
Scoring spurts seem to be a
Hoosier trademark. Their effort
against Michigan State also fea-
tured just such a blazing period.
Trailing by one in the second
half, the Hoosiers reeled off an
impressive 15 straight points. Led
by big Steve Downing and what
Indiana coach Bobby Knight called
"our best defense to date," the
Hoosiers scored almost at will be-
fore the Spartans could answer with
a bucket.
Again the ringleader was Buck-
ner. The frosh phenom was

'rr
rap for
simply that and although he
didn't rip the cords with a lot of
points, he did play an extremely
mature floor game. A game total
of four turnovers speaks highly
of the discipline and composure
the entire squad maintains.
Purdue, after its sterling per-
formance against the Wolverines,
took on the Badgers Monday and
deposited the furry mammals of
Wisconsin further down in the con-
ference race. Although the Boiler-
makers did not play a particularly
sharp game, they were consider-
Track Saturday
Michigan opens its 1973 track
season Saturday as they host
the Michigan Relays in Yost
Fieldhouse. Several outstanding
track performers will be on
hand, including middle distance
man Dave Wottle and MSU
sprinters Herb Washington and
Marshall Dill. More details later
in the week.

title
aspirations of the Spartans. Out-
gunned and outhustled on the
boards, the Spartans could only
watch the Badgers sweep by
them Saturday by the surprising-
ly high score of 93-80.
The victory was the first in Big
Ten play for the Badgers while the
Spartans, with their two losses,
found their record notched at 2-3.
Meanwhile the Iowa Hawkeyes
continued their baffling ways. In
their usual just fall short fashion
the Hawks, who have dropped four
straight tough ball games, watched
Alan Torynak pump in 26 points,
including four free throws in the
final seconds to give Ohio State a
75-72 victory Saturday. The vic-
tory broke the win drought for the
Buckeyes.
Illinois did not see action on
either Saturday or Monday.
Although the season is far from
being over for any team, Big Ten
members have to be wondering
just what is the cure for Indiana
fever.

4

Jj

4

/

Doily Photo by ROLFE TESSEM
HENRY WILMORE shoots over 3-2 zone of Purdue's Jovan Price (31) and John Garrett as Ken Brady
watches in Michigan's heartbreaking 63-62 loss to Purdue last Saturday.

SPECIAL! HOT CHOCOLATE
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ably shaper than the Badgers, who
turned the ball over 24 times. The
Boilermakers pounded away at the
Badgers and finally subdued them,
66-59.
"We played sloppy," comment-
ed Coach Fred Schaus, "but we'll
learn from our mistakes. We
definitely had a big letdown'after
the Michigan win on Saturday."
With the way all have been play-
ing, the Boilermakers don't reckon
to be spoilermakers this campaign.
Wisconsin had mixed luck in
its two basketball outings. Their
first was considerably more suc-
cessful than their showdown with
Purdue. Powered by the deadly
eye and .strong defense of Leon
Howard and the grim rebound-
ing strength of the Hughes
brothers, the Badgers dealt a
crippling blow to the flagging title
FIRES BURN
I MORE
THANI
1 TREES

Practice matures tunm bier's skills

NEWT RECRUITS

By THERESA SWEDO
Patrons of gymnastics don't
often regard their sport as public-
ly popular. Gymnasts themselves
work and perform without much
fanfare, even on a sports-
conscious campus.
But as a skillful individual
sport, gymnastics rates highly.
In competition relying on
strength and ability, it requires
a process of conditioning and
practice. With Michigan gym-
nastics, this process begins with
the high school athlete.
"We draw many boys from
Illinois high schools and the
Canadian clubs around Mont-
real," says Coach Newt Loken.
"We correspond with coaches

on our mailing list, attend high
school meets and receive letters
from the gymnasts ,themselves,"
he continued.
CONDUCTING a one-man
coaching operation, Dr. Newt
Loken attends to all aspects of
recruiting. He chooses his ath-
letes from observation at high
school meets, and with the aid of
movies taken at other competi-
tions.
"We award scholarships on the
basis of talent, and then financial
need. Some boys have partials
that make affording Michigan
much easier," Loken commented.
"In addition to the recruits, we
get walk-ons, a good sources of

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at the door after 6 p.m.

talent, too," he added.
When the rookie gymnast ar-
rives at Michigan, practice be-
gins immediately.
"We like to say we practice
13 hours a day," Loken said.
"Sessions are held every after-
noon 'from .2:00 to 7:00 p.m.,
seven days a week. But, I tend
to encourage the regulars to
skip one day during the week.
"In practice the guys repeat
movements to gain familiarity,"
Loken pointed out. "The more
familiar the gymnast is with the
move, the better he is at it."
"We try to develop the routines
that the boys bring with them
from high school. The purpose is
to enlarge and improve on their
moves, techniques and execu-
tion," Coach Loken continued.
"WE DON'T try to change the
boy's routine drastically, just in-
crease the difficulty," he con-
cluded.
During practice the gymnast
learns the Olympic compulsory
events required in every meet.
The compulsories are a difficult
set of tricks performed by every
gymnast in his speciality. The
all-around men must learn six
compulsory routines.
Practice sessions also keep the
gymnast in shape, a constant
effort. Loken comments, "It only
takes two days for an athlete to
get out of condition."
"New rules only allow 12 men
to compete in conference meets
and 15 in dual meets. There are
usually 18 to 20 men on the
team, which creates some dis-
appointments," Loken stated.
Four judges score each per-
formance on a 0 to 10 range.
They delete the high and low
scores and average the other two
for the athlete's total. The top
two individual scores are used in
determining the team score.

Athletes also compete for the
all-around title of the meet. This
involves no team score.
DURING the season Loken
keeps his team in shape mentally
by writing daily notes and sug-
gestions to them. He reviews
each meet on the following day.
The entire process of recruit-
ment, practice and competition
produces gymnastic quality. It
is this kind of balance that pro-
duces a top notch team like the
one Michigan fields today.
Michigan goes into its meet
Saturday at Minnesota after
scoring a' convincing win over
North Carolina last weekend,
157.15-125.35. Once again it was
the duo of ringmen Joe Neuens-
wander and Monty Falb that
paved the way, Falb with a 9.25
while Neuenswander scored an
impressive 9.2. Bruce Medd led
the overall competitors with
46.15.
The Top Twenty
By The Associated Press
1. UCLA (41) 14-0 838
2. N. Carolina St. (1) 12-0 756
3. North Carolina 15-1 581
4. Maryland 12-1 575
5. Long Beach S6. 15-1 555
6. Indiana 11-2 288
7. Missouri 13-2 283
)8. Minnesota 11-2 277
9. Alabama 10-1 275
10. Marquette 12-2 244
11. Houston 12-2 209
12. SW Louisiana 12-1 183
13. Jacksonville 13-2 173
14. Providence 10-2 149
15. St. John's 11-2 97
16. San Francisco 12-2 81
17. Memphis State 12-3 30
18. Kansas State 11-3 29
19. New Mexico 15-2 28
20. Purdue 10-3 27
Others receiving votes, listed alpha-
betically: Brigham Young; Florida
State; Iowa State; Louisville; MICHI-
GAN; Oral Roberts; Oklahoma; Oregon
State; Oklahoma City; Penn; Santa
Clar; St. Joseph's Pa.; Southern Cal;
Syracuse; Tulsa; Vanderbilt; VPI.

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"RAGA is an extraordinary film, a mystical, stun-
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RAGA fills the eyes, ears and mind with new ideas
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7:30 P.M., AUD. IV

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in connection with
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is currently offering a limited number of PRIVATE
FLAMENCO GUITAR LESSONS. Lessons will be
offered on a first come basis and are limited to
Monday and Friday only.
Be Sure to See
Mr. Juan Serrano in concert
Thursday, January 25,

i
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11

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