100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 24, 1973 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesdov. nrnrv 24 .197

s :v--r4+a6141 - - %A. I1 4'# J.#-

..

YEAR-END REPORT:
Inflation up 3.4%

Hippies flock to N. Sumatra
for cheap grass, easy living

NEW MORNING PRESENTS

Chester Himes'

Ossie Davis'

WASHINGTON (M) -- Consumer
prices rose moderately in Decem-
ber, closing out 1972 with a 3.4 per
cent increase in the rate of infla-
tion, the same as 1971, the gov-
ernment reported yesterday.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics
(BLS), said, however, that prev-
iously reported sharp increases in
wholesale prices, particularly for
food, were not reflected in t h e
December Consumer Price Index
report.
Consumers may be noticing the
increase this monthbthe BLS hint-
ed.
Herbert Stein, chairman of t h e
President's Council of Economic
Advisors, said rising retail f o o d
prices are to be expected in the
months ahead."
He noted that the administra-
tion has decided to retain price
controls on food and is trying to
increase food production as well
as reduce the amount of food held
in stocks.
As for other price increases,
Stein said, "the administration has
and will use, if necessary, manda-

tory authority to prevent excessive
increases."~
There were lowerrprices report-
ed for meat, fresh fruits, and used
cars, the BLS said. But increases
in new car prices, mainly because
of a Price Commission order allow-
ing price boosts on 1973 models,
pushed up the index for nonfood
commodities.
The 3.4 per cent annual increase
in inflation was over the Nixon
administration's target. It h a d
hoped to cut inflation to the range
of 2 to 3 per cent by the end of the
year.
Stein said that the December in-
crease was well within the target.
The administration never said whe-
ther the target applied to one
month, a quarter, six months or a
year.
"Conditions have improved for
reaching reasonable price stabil-
ity," Stein said in a statement.
In another report, the B L S
said that average weekly earnings
of American workers rose 2.7 per
cent in 1972. The figure is adjusted
to eliminate the effect of inflation.,

INDONESIA (Reuters) - West-
ern hippies are flocking to North
Sumatra around the city of Me-
dan, attracted by the cheap mari-
juana and easy living.
Marijuana grows in profusion in
this part of Sumatra and the local
residents have used it for years-
to spice their food and cure upset
stomachs and sore feet.
For years government officials
ignored the fact that the sale and
purchase of genja (its local name)
by the kilogramm was as simple
and about as risky as buying ciga-
rettes.
But North Sumatra's sudden
popularity among young western-
ers and a growing smuggling trade
which brought pressure from other
governments, along with signs
that young Indonesians were start-
ing to cmoke it in large numbers,
has brought about a police crack-
down.
Police have brned off more than

240 acres of marijuana plants
aroundrCedan in the past few
months and farmers have been
sternly warned about growing it.
But supplies show no signs of
drying up. All police have appar-
ently succeeded in doingso far is
pushing the sources of supply far-
ther from the city.
Genja's most famous traditional
use here is in curries. The dried
marijuana leaves give a fine flav-
or to the food and Indonesian cab-
inet ministers have been among
those to praise its excellence.
One government official, de-
scribing how good it was, said,
"after eating it you feel satis-
fied. And yeah, rather light in the
head."
Farmers use it as an herb to treat
foot trouble in their cattle and also
feed the green leaves to them. The
leaves, boiled in water, are also
a traditional cure for human stom-
ach ailments.

Farmers who have long made
marijuana a profitable sideline
have defended their crops from po-
lice raids by planting it further
from the roads.
Several foreigners have been ar-
rested for trying to smuggle mari-
juana abroad from here or for
possession of the drug.
The major case to come before
the courts involved a young Aus-
tralian, David Theiler, 22, of Mel-
bourne, who was arrested in Ja-
karta as he arrived from Medan
with two suitcases allegedly pack-
ed with marijuana.
He was sentenced to two years
jail in October last year.
COMING
THURSDAY
9:30 P.M.-MODERN
LANGUAGES AUD. III
iE
"AESTHETICALLY AND AURALLY
STUNNING. PROVIDES MOMENTS
OF UNFORGETTABLE BRILLIANCE."
( r" "im k) AN ELECTRIFYING AND
ELECTRIFIED PICTURE." ( n:)
BY DA. PENIE9AKER
RMED AT THE MONTEREY INTERNATIONAL POP FESTIVAL
A LEACOCK PENNEBAKER RELEASE 1n a
NEW WORLD FILM CO-OP
761-8522

Cotton Comes to Harlem
directed by OSSIE DAVIS
Godfrey Cambridge and Raymond St. Jacques star as Chester Himes' Harlem
detectives "Coffin Ed" Johnson and "Gravedigger" Jones, hilariously pur-
suing a fortune of the people's money, "stolen" from a Back-to-Africa rally
held by the glamorous Rev. Duke O'Malley. At the climax, the money turns
up under a bale of cotton used as the central prop in a new striptease num-
ber, but not before devastating spoofs of the police, mock-insurrections,
car-chases, and the funniest sex scene in modern filmmaking. Great!

I

.

one day only
$1.25 CONT.

TONIGHT
7:15 and 9:00

January 24
FRIENDS OF NEWSREEL

I

i

I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
6:r;*. .r F}7v...fi{'" m .. "*a F S

i

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24 sarily teaching. Also, Master of Arts
in teaching programs in elementary &
DAY CALENDAR many fields of secondary. Applications
Center for Continuing Education of SUMMER PLACEMENT
Women : "What is it Like to be a 212 PLCSABN
Working-Woman-Student?" Rooms 4 ANNOUNCEMENT
and 5, League, noon. U. S. Dept of Commerce, Wash., D.C.
Psych. 171 Film Series: "High School," Summer Intern Program, Social and
UGLI Multipurpose Rm., 4 pm. Economic Statistics Admin. for stu-
Student Lab Theatre: "An Original dents completing Bachelor's degree in
Affair," and "Revolving Door," Arena June, interested in quantitative work
Theatre, Frieze Bldg., 4 pm. in various economic' and demographic
Botany-Comm. on Tropical Studies fields. Further details available.
Seminar: J. Beaman, MSU, "The Dis- American Zionist Youth Foundation,
appearing Tropical Rain Forest, of N Y.: 1973 Israel Summer Programs
Southern Veracruz," Lect. Rm. 2, Mod,.none.Porm icue ok
Lang.,Bldg., 4 pm. ;none.Pormicue ok
Statistics Seminar: G. Tintner, dis- study, theater, medical, drama and1
tinguished prof. of econ. & mathe- strms. D eils available.-- broad pro-
matics, USC, "The Use of Differences Council on International Educa-
& Transformations in the Estimation tional Exchange, N. Y. Information on
of Econometric Relations," 2003 An- Summer Jobs in Britain and Australia.
gell Hall, 4 pm. Full detaIls available.
Physics Colloquium: J. Janecke, ATTENTION: final application date
"Properties of Nuclei Par Away from for ' taking Federal Summer Exam for
the Regio4 of Beta-Stability," P&A 1973 is Jan. 26; applications received
Co mputi Cen er Lecture: E. ron- after that da willnot be accepted.
Comptin Cener ectue: . Frnc- Ann Arbor Viet Vets Against the War
zak, "The FORTRAN IV Programming is holding an organizational meeting
Language-I," Nat. Se. Aud., 7:30 pm. for all interested vets, Wed., Jan. 25.
ENACT Meeting: 2051 Nat. Set., 7:30 8 pm, 3540 SAB.
pm d CThe Psychology Undergraduate As-
Grad Coffee Hour: E. Conf. Rm., sociation is sponsoring a meeting, Jan.
VACU-Daystar: In Concert, David 25, 7:00 pm. 3540 SAB.
Bromberg & Terry Tate, Power Ctr.,
8 pm. The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
Musical Society: Ko Iwasaki, cellist, aged by students at the University of
Hill 'Aud., 8:30 pm. Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Rive Gauche: International coffee Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
hour, 1024 Hill St., 9 pm. igan 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
CARiEER PLANNING & PLACEMENT Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
3200 SAB day through Sunday morning Univer-
Postdoctoral fellowships offered by sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
universities in England, Scotland & carrier (campus area); $11 local mail
Ireland, by Imperial Chemical Indus- (in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
tries Ltd., in many areas: physics, (other states and foreign).
chem., engrg., medical & biological sd. Summer Session published Tuesday
ences, beginning Oct. 1973. Deadline through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
Feb, 6. tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
University of Chicago Library School area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
offers fellowships: Deadline Feb. 1 New Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
Graduate Program in Early Childhood states and foreigni.
Education at U. of Chicago, not neces.
Due to overwhelming response
will be conducting new
GROUP LESSONS IN GUITAR
Beginning January 29th
Rental instrument kits are available at a
nominal charge applicable toward purchase
of the instrument. Private and group les-
sons are also available in guitar, flute, re-
corder, banjo, and drums.'
For information call 769-4980
*tn /b4 .Wu#ic #topt

{I
I

1

The most remarkable film
I have seen this year.
-Arthur Schlesinger Jr.
Sat., Sun. and
Wed. at ..s . *
1 P.M. and
7:10 P.M.
Promptly1

TON IGHT

UAC-DAYSTA R
in conjunction with WNRZ
presents

M-
Thon.-Tue.- I.Un rs.
Thur.-Fri. at I~
7:10 P.M. onlyC
Theatre Phone 668-6416'
Cinema 5 Presents
The Sorrow and ThePity
Directed by Marcel Ophuls

_ __

I

336 S. STATE

MON.-SAT. 9:30-9:00

DOMINO'S ANN STREET SHOP
STILL HAS THE BEST
PIZZA ON CAMPUS
AND THE
Free Fast Hot Delivery YouExpect
(Our Delivery Is Even Faster This Term)

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan