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April 18, 1974 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-04-18

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, April 18, 1974

P a e w T E M I H G A AfY h rs', p i l811 7

,: i

WOULD YOU LIKE A
SCHOLARSHIP
that pays your tuition, lab fees, & books
for your last two years of college?
WOULD YOU LIKE AN
INCOME
of $100 a month for 5-6 hours work a week
during your last two years of college?
WOULD YOU LIKE A GUARANTEED
EMPLOYMENT
after graduation with earnings of a
V2 MILLION $
in your first twenty years after college?
Program open to all undergraduate
and graduate students.
For more information call Univ. of Michigan
764-2400-Ask for Jim

Court refuses motion to drop
charges against AIM leaders

ST. PAUL, Minn. (A-A federal
judge yesterday rejected a motion
to dismiss charges against Ameri-
can Indian Movement (AIM) lead-
ers Dennis Banks and Russell
Means, who are charged in last
year's 71-day takeover of Wounded
Knee, S.D.
However, U.S. District Court
Judge Fred Nichol held that the
government may not use any evi-
dence it secured through monitor-
ing of - phone calls coming out of
the Trading Post at Wounded Knee
during the occupation last year.
Banks and Means are accused of
10 felony counts for alleged lead-
ership roles.
THE JUDGE coupled his order
with criticism of the prosecution
and the FBI.
Nichol ordered that the FBI con-
tinue to search its files for any
data that could be helpful to the
defense.
He said the government may not
introduce evidence which it hadn't
handed over to the defense by
March 8 , when he: ordered FBI
files on Wounded Kneo impounded.
THE SIX-LAWYER d e f e n s e
team, headed by radicalclawyer
William Kunstler, had charged
other misconduct by U.S. attorneys
and the FBI.
However, Nichol said some ob-
vious cases of negligence and in-
competence w e r e not serious

enough to warrant dismissal.
Nichol's sharpest criticism was
leveled at the FBI, which he de-
clared had failed as a "servant
of the people" in this case.
"This transcript proliferates with
what this court concludes to be
negligent and impedimentary con-
duct of the FBI in complying with
the discovery order," he said.
LAST OCT. 16, Nichol ordered
the government to start turning
over to attorneys any file data
which would be helpful in defend-
ing Banks and Means.
In his ruling yesterday, he cited
eight -examples of FBI miscon-
duct. One was belatedly turning
over to the prosecution memos
quoting agents who monitored five
conversations w h i c h he called
illegal.
William Clayton, U.S. attorney
for South Dakota and one of four
prosecution lawyers, said that sup-
pression of certain evidence was
not a ksetbak. "We don't believe
it's a .mortal wound, it "wasn't un-
expected," he said.
Clayton said Sens. George Mc-
Govern and James Abourezk, both
South Dakota Democrats, may be
called as witnesses- when the trial
resumes May 1. They were among
early. negotiators after the Feb.
27, 1973 occupation began.
ON TWO ISSUES. that went to
the heart of the hearing, Nichol
found that the government hadn't
used,: the roadblock -phone for ne-
gotiating with Indians, but for
monitoring some calls. And he
could find no proof that any client-
attorney talks were overheard nor
that the defense was prejudiced by
any monitored talks.
Nichol said that although Joseph
Trimbach, special agent in charge
of the Minneapolis FBI bureau,
testified incorrectly on two key.

points, he did not do so intention-
ally
Trimbach had assured Nichol
there had been no wiretapping at
Wounded Knee and that he had not
signed an affidavit applying for a
court-ordered monitoring of the
telephone.
"These statements were untrue,"
the judge said.
Fraternity
president
i "
(Continued from Page 1)
Mike in church on March 25 and
had a "casualconversation" with
him. Mike made "no mention" of
the incident with Marella.
"We want to save him some
embarrassment" about the entire
incident' says Walter, "We did not
want this to get a lot of publicity
so Mike would not have to explain
it to the world," he added.
Mike is supposed to graduate
this spring and Walter is concern-
ed that he may not be able to now.
Only one other fraternity mem-
ber besides Kubinski knew about
the woman's visit, according to an-
other fraternity member. Several
days later the rest were told by the
police, who said that it would be
best if they weren't to talk about
the incident. They did however ex-
press concern about Kubinski's
well being and that there are no
new developments.

Postill dealt
unexpected
blow in jail
controversy
(Continued from Page 1)
The actions by the Commission-
ers last night were unexpected be-
cause the proposal to name Spick-
ard as project chief had been
passed last week, after heated dis-
cussion, in the County Ways and
Means committee. And the full
Board of Commissioners, ordinar-
ily accepts its committee recom-
mendations with little debate.
THE CONTROVERSY surround-
ing the jail began two weeks ago
when Postill fired three staff em-
ployes of the rehabilitation pro-
gram, and Jail Administrator Was-
son subsequently resigned.
Charges have been hurled back
and forth since the controversy be-
gan. The discharged staffers ac-
cused Postill of acting arbitrarily
and without just cause. Postill, in
turn, claimed they refused to ac-
cept his ultimate authority, and
said they had been insubordinate.
After his resignation, Wasson
charged Postill with racism and
claimed the sheriff "had consist-
ently acted to usurp (my) author-
ity as jail administrator".,
POSTILL responded to Wasson's
allegations directly for the first
time yesterday, charging his ex-
employe with "maladministration"
in a letter to the County Commis-
sioners.
"I am now convinced,"he wrote,
"that the largest error I have
made since becoming sheriff was
my failure to exercise the closest
sort of supervision over Mr. Was-
son's activities."
The actions at last night's county
board meeting served to separate
the issue of the discharged em-
ployes from the events leading to
Wasson's resignation. The fired
staffers are now petitioning the
board for reinstatement and back
pay.
Wasson voluntarily resigned his
job. Along with a group of sup-
porters at last night's meeting, he
has requested a full investigation
into the circumstances leading to
his resignation.
Ladies' and Children's
Hairstyling @ Specialty...
Appointments Available
Dascola Barber Shops
Arborand--97 1-9975
Maple Vilage--761 -2733
E. Liberty-668-9329
E. Univsity-662-0354

Legitimization sought
for Tolkien, Lewis

(Continued from Page 1)
erature at Wheaton College in Il-
linois, Kilby has worked in recent
years to preserve and legitimize
the art of Tolkien and Lewis. He,
has started a Lewis collection of
Manuscripts and memorabilia at
Wheaton College and has authored
several books about Lewis. He is
still working on a manuscript en-
titled, Glimpses of Tolkien.
A folksy, non-professorial type
who speaks with a pronounced mid-
western twang, Kilby believes
Tolkien and Lewis are much more
than "fairy tale writers."
"In their works," he told some
100 listeners yesterday, "they
sought a larger truth: they had a
mythic vision of life."
Two students of Kilby persuaded
him to read Tolkien some 20 years
ago. "They said I would never be
truly educated until I read Lord
of the Rings," Kilby recalled yes-
terday. "I didn't get around to
reading it until two years later.

But once I had finished The Hob-
bitt, I was hooked."
KILBY'S INTEREST in Tolkien
was strengthened, he said, after a
visit to England where he got "a
foot in Tolkien's door." In 1965,
he wrote a letter to the novelist.
"I told him I would open his mail,
file his raners-do anything at all
that wold leave him free to com-
plete The Sillmerilon." The Sill-
merillion was the work Tolkien left
uncompleted at the time of his
death last year. Kilby said the
work will be published within the
next two years in incomnlete form.
Kilby remembers Tolkien as a
"man of paradoxes" who was often
"Cnftle ad sweet-sodrited" but
who co'ild become gruff and un-
pleasant when angered.
"He liked to do crossword puzzles
and to read detective stories,"
Kirby recalled. "But his favorite
nasttime was to sit at his desk,
hunch over stranee alphabets, and
work on his elvish languages."

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Graduati on
Announcements, c
for
GRADUATING
SENIORS
ARE NOW ON SALE
Information Desk Main Lobby L.S.A. Bldg.-

Thursday, April 18
Day Calendar.
Maternal and Child Health Care:
film, "Caring More Than a Day," HV
3042 SPH I, noon.
MHRI: A. Newell, Carnegie-Mellon
Univ., "Production System Models of
Cognition," 1057 MHRI, 3:45 p.m.
Math: Prof. C. Clark, Univ. of British
Columbia, "Optimal Controi Theory
and Renewable Resource Management,"
3201 Angell, 4 p.m.
Nuclear Sem.: R. Sherr, Princeton
Univ., "Particle Hole States in the Mass
40 Region," P&A Colioq. Rm., 4 p.m.
Low Energy Serri.: M. Misakian, Univ.
of Maryland, "Translational Spectro-
scopy: A New Spectroscopy," 2038 Ran-
dall Lab., 4 p.m.
Statistics: Wm. Meitlowski, Univ. of
Rochester, "Construction and Effic-
iency of Multivariate Indices with Ap.
plications to the Analysis of Qualitative
Data," 4007 Angell, 4 p.m.
American Heritage Night: Southern
style menu, League, 5-7:15 p.m.
SGC: 3X, Union, 7:30 p.m.
..Classical Studies: The Seligson Pla-
tus Players in a Roman comedy, Plau-
tus' "Curculio" alias "The weevil,"
the foyer of Angell Hall, 8 p.m.
Musical Society: Nikolais Dance The-
atre, Power, 8 p.m.
Music School: Michael Bayer, cello
Doctoral, School of Music Rehearsal
Hall,,8 p.m.

Music School: Jay De Vris,=clarinet,
Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
Music School: Brass Quintet, Cady
Music Rm., Stearns Bldg., 8 p.m.
Music School: Univ. Symphony Band,
George Cavender, conductor, Hill Aud.,
8 p.m.
Career Planning and Placement
3200 SAB
INTERVIEwING ON C A M P U S:
TEACHER CORPS, 2 Yr. Program for
Lib. Arts Grads leading to a M's plus
TC. Spend 3a time in school & %~
time in community. $90/Wk plus 15
for each dependent. Phone 764-7456 to
make interview appt.
Summer Placement
3200 SAB 763-4117
Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI. Open-
ings for prod. Assembly jobs on Sat.
nights. Details avail.
Anderson vehicle Sales, Detroit. Sev.
openings for mechanics for motor-
cycles - also, over-the-counter selling.
Details avail.
Sherwin Williams, Detroit. Openings
factory work - various types. Salary
range open dep. on work. Details avail.
Pfizer, Chemical Div., Groton, Conn.
Opening for chemist with, thorough
knowledge in 'liquid chromatography
req. Details avail. Grad. stud:
. John Deer Ins. Co. Ill. Openings for
student in Jun. yr. interest Admin.
field of Ins. Details avail.

GLENN DAVIS and K-PRINCE ENTERPRISES
PRESENTS
AN EVENING WITH

ANN ARBOR'S GREATS

Today is the 26th day
of Nissan which
has been set aside
as a memorial and
day of mourning for
the 6,000,000 Jews
victims of Nazism
1939-1945
JEWISH POPULATION FIGURES 1939-1945

e

FEATURING: WHERE:
Donald Hall-poet Sunday, April 21
Suheyla-belly-dancer 7-9 p.m.
Glenn Davis--poet, excorist Henderson Room
Michigan League
Carolyn Gregory-poet Tickets available at Centicore,
New Air-realistic music Manord St., and Wherehouse,
Ypsilanti
Sponsored by Bullard Action Now Group

JOIN THE DAILY STAFF
Phone 764-0558.

In

AIR FORCE ROTC
Has Two-Year Scholarships
Available for

l

AN
EDUCATIONAL
HAPPENING
ON

COUNTRY JEWISH POPULATION-1939
POLAND , 3,200,000
U.S.S.R. 2,100,000
RUMANIA 850,000
HUNGARY 404,000
CZECHOSLOVAKIA 315,000
FRANCE 300,000
GERMANY 210;000
LITHUANIA 150,000
HOLLAND 150,000
LATVIA 95,000
BELGIUM 90,000
GREECE 75,000
YUGOSLAVIA 75,000
AUSTRIA 60,000
ITALY 57,000
BULGARIA 50,000
OTHERS 20,000

JEWS KILLED
2,800,000
1,500,000
425,000
200,000
260,000
90,000
170,000
135,000
90,000
85,000
40,000
60,000
55,000
40,000
15,000
7,000
6,000

% KILLED
85%
71.4%
50%
49.5%
82.5%
30%
81 %
90%
60%
89.5%
44.4%Q/
80%
73.3 %
66.6
26.3%
14%
30%
72%

I

Computer Technology
Architecture
Aeronautical Engineering
Aerospace Engineering
Architectural Engineering
Astronautical Engineering

Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Industrial Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Mathematics
Meteorology

APR.

19th

I

TOTAL:

8,301,000

5,978,000

is your major listed above? Could you use help to defray your college
expenses? If you have two years of school remaining, undergraduate, grad-
uate or combination, you could be eligible for an Air Force ROTC two-year
scholarship. It pays full tuition, all fees, textbooks, and $100 each month.
FOR MORE DETAILS CONTACT:
Captain Lance Dyar, Room 156, North Hall-or call 764-2403
or 764-2405

AND

APR.

20th

JUST IN
Uni~orn

PUT IT ALL TOGETHER IN AIR FORCE ROTC

IN

202/SR

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M plus

M Recall

Senator Bursley has failed to lead the Republican Party or the
state of Michigan. He has served for 14 years and still we rely on
a property tax which provides no money for Ann Arbor Schools
in 1975 and raises student rents to the highest in the state; utility
rates keep rising with approval of the Republican dominated pub-
lic services commission; industry ravages the environment - our
lakes and our air are raped for profit; tuition rises and the uni-
versity doesn't get enough money to keep faculty salaries com-
petitive; women do not get equal pay for comparable jobs and
the city cuts services because of inadequate income-

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