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January 16, 1974 - Image 8

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Michigan Daily, 1974-01-16

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Page tlg1 '

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, January 16, 1971 '

page ~i*~Wf* THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, January 16, 1974

Militant lawyer tells of black
progress since King's death

Israeli stand on troops due

I,

(Continued from Page 1)
economic strategy and not white
racism as the black man's major
enemy. The first objective for De-
troit citizens, he stated, should be
to develop the high level of con-
sciousness necessary to adopt a
scientificcmethod tof resolving the
current contradiction between'La-
bor and workers.
"The blacks on campus wanted
to hear Ken Cockrel" said Dr.
Locke of the Center for Afro-Amer-
ican Studies. "We want to have
speakers who are from the streets,
who are dealing with real prob-
lems" he explained. "Students
know about Cockrel. Ken's always
worked 'in Detroit. He's not a
stranger."
MOST STUDENTS know rKen
Cockrel as the tireless opponent of
Detroits' STRESS program and as
Haywood Brown's defense attor-
ney.
"There's a kind of euphoria in
Detroit right now" Cockrel said in
reference to the election of Cole-
man Young. He termed this ela-
tion "understandable" but made
clear that such joy does not go far
in solving current black problems.
Because of Young's background,
which includes accusations of pos-
sible Communist affiliation, black
militants saw him as being suppor-
tive of their struggle with police
when he took office.

But the mayor has kept one of'
the originators of the bitterly op-
posed STRESS program as his po-
lice commissioner. In Cockrel's
words, it became a "question of
survival" for blacks to fight re-7
lentlessly for the abolition of
STRESS.
AS FOR YOUNG, Cockrel agrees
that there is the tendencyfor
blacks to feel that one of their own'
is in office and must be give a+
chance. The attorney's own plan,
is to place every pressure possible
on Young to make certain he meets
the real needs of the people of De-
troit.
"The white ruling class is not
leaving Detroit," Cockrel said,
"they are rebuilding and reshift-
ing." He points to current record
profits and the merging of or-
ganizations. "This ruling class
doesn't care if blacks take over
the city" he explained, "because
they will take over all the power
anyway."
"THE NAACP is being made into
a snitch organization" Cockrel
claimed. "Blacks are urged to re-
port crime evidence to them,
whereupon it is reported to police.
Blacks are being asked to blind-
ly ratify anything the Detroit po-
lice department does."
Cockrel spoke briefly of Martin
Luther King saying that what King
called civil rights are in fact only

"technical rights on paper".
"People went through hell" he
said, "to be allowed to go to the
john, to be permitted to use drink-
ing fountains. They forced adjust-
ments at fantastic costs." He be-
lieves, however, that King soon
saw "civil rights" had little to do
with change in material living con-
ditions. Cockrel thinks that King
came to realize that workers play-
ed the central role in the black
man's struggle before his death.

(Continued from Page 1)
would present a statement to the
new Parliament which holds its
first session on Monday, on the
security and political situation as
well as the negotiations that have
been going on.
U.S. officials said that they in-
terpreted the Cabinet communique
as meaning that the Israeli gov-
ernment wanted further clarifica-
tions before making a final deci-
sion. They did not rule out the
possibility thatbmore trips would
be necessary between Aswan and
Jerusalem before a conclusion was
reached.
A R O U N D MIDNIGHT local

time, Dayan and Eban joined the
working party trying to formulate
the proposals Kissinger would take
with him, and it was expected thatI
they would work through part rfj
the night drafting ideas for an
early morning session with Kis-
singer before he flies off to Aswan.
In Egypt President Anwar Sadat'
conferred yesterday with Libyan
Premier Abdel Salam Jalloud as
he awaited Kissinger's return from
Israel.
THERE WAS no official word
in Aswan on what Sadat discussed
with Jalloud, but it was generally
presumed the projected merger
between Libya and Tunisia was a

major topic.
While talks continued, three Is-
raeli soldiers were wounded in
Egyptian breaches of the cease-
fire on the Suez Canal front yes-
terday, the Israel army claimed.
A spokesman said there were no
casualties in a two-hour intermit-
tent artillery exchange on the Sy-
rian front and described Damas-
cus' claims of heavy Israeli casu-
alties as "fanciful."
MILITARY OBSERVERS said
they thought recent Syrian claims'
of heavy Israeli casualties in fir-
ing in contravention of the cease-
fire were m a d e for political
purposes.

JANUARY
SALE
20% to 50% 01i
on
MANY
SHOES and
BOOTS

822
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