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January 16, 1974 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-16

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Wednesday, January 16, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Fags Five

Wednesday, January 16, 1974 [HE MICHIGAN DAILY

_. eJFiv

Anl artist e
By SARA RIMER stay at a tuberculosis sanitarium
George Karr likes faces. That in Colorado. After his release he
is one's initial impression upon was granted "a scholarship to
entering the Pyramid Gallery's study art at the University of
opening Sunday of 32 of Karr's Colorado. But, it took only one
recent watercolors, pastels, and semester to convince Karr that
drawings. Faces - thoughtful, th-( discipline of academic life
angry, fearful, mocking, serene, would riot be the way to develop
and happy all combine to demon- his own personal style.
strate the rick background and Karr's rise to his present
vast range of Karr's work. growing popularity and success
The 32-year-old artist was born was not a smooth, uneventful
in Munich, Germany during WW one. At one particularly low point
11 and came to the U. S. at the he was forced to invite people in-
age of 13. He first became inter- to his studio in order to give his
ested in art during a two year paintings away. He also had to

Xplores
master a difficult period of alco- ma
holism. Events changed, and fac
Karr is now a well-established Bu
artist living in Tampa, Florida. evi
Perhaps it is Karr's turbulent, ing
varied past that accounts for the of
many different faces the exhibi- qui
tion displays. Some of them, par- ma
ticularly in one pastel work en- hav
titled "The Philosopher," are blo
grotesque caricatures that glare def
fiercely at the observor. Here, pla
Karr employs garish, clashing exp
colors and bold, slashing lines to wit
produce a violent, highly expres- It
sive work. As one woman re- phi

the

rked, "He likes to destroy his
es a little bit."
ut, there is a curious balance
dent in the exhibition. Soften-
the somewhat brutal effect
"The Philosopher" is the
et, more gentle face of "Wo-
n." The harsh, jarring tones
ve been replaced by childlike
cks of bright, -happy pastels
ining a serene face contem-
ting life with a Madonna-like
pression of peace combined
h lingering suffering.
t appears that the raging
losopher had discovered some
rinsic faith in humanity after
ch pain and searching. "Wo-
n" seems to express the side
Karr that gallery owner and
ector Martin Nyrkkanen de-
ibes as "very reserved, gentle,
soft-spoken."
ontrasting the serious, brood-'
quality of "The Philosopher,"
"Woman" are "Clown 1"
"Clown 2'. Their delightful,

curving lines reveal a touch of
the whimsical. Looking at this
picture, one must agree with
Nyrkkanen's statement, "Karr
just enjoys people." And when
he's not enjoying them, he is ex-
ploring them ruthlessly, never
ceasing in his effort to compre-
hend their passions, hopes and
weaknesses.
Bob Martin, Tampa Times art
critic presently in Ann Arbor, is
a close friend of Karr's. In talk-
ing with him it is quickly appar-
ent that he has a deep respect
and faith in Karr as an artist and
human being. He describes the
artist's development from very
grotesque, nightmarish pictures
to lighter, freer works as: "Sud-
denly there was a transition into
something better. I think he's
going to develop even more now.
He's groping for something."
Martin cited the exhibition's
theme of "humanism, of people
kind of touching one another and

face.
groping for something together."
This idea is sensitively portray-
ed in "George and Harriet", con-
te, an intimate portrait of the
nude artist and his wife that
seems to depict the first tentative
discoveries of Adam and Eve.
Martin emphasizes that Karr is
not always sure of what's going
to happen when he begins a work.
He is not following a concise,
conceptualized formula for art.
Martin points to a work entitled
"Gerizim and Ebal" saying,
They're asking the question,
'What's going to happen out
there?"' It is a vital question
that Karr seems to be always
asking with his faces.
Karr's exhibition, which will
run until Feb. 2, is peopled with
living, suffering, passionate indi-
viduals. Whatever our response
to them, we must agree with one
observer's comment, "He likes
faces, this guy."

w:m~i. r/

COME ON DOWN.

see

on the a'r-LIVE!
Bro vcasting from THE
SCENE at 341 So. Main
S t r e e t, downtown Ann
Arbor
5 See J.L. "Lighting" Hen-
dricks and Bill Champion, plus
s ~other favorites like: "Ludio on
the Radio."
Free Albums-Free Posters
Many Give-a-Ways Galore!
The BEST Music---
all night long

mages

inti
mu
ma
of
dir
scri
and
C
ing
and
and

WAIX Air Waves: The
Stones may play Las Vegas

Listen to the action on 650 AM in your dorm, and COME ON DOWN

341 S. MAIN ST. ANN ARBOR 769-5960

I

uac-daystar pre ent

By WABX
The Rolling Stones are looking
into the possibility of playing in
Las Vegas next year, at the new
M.G.M. hotel. According to the
Stone's promoter, Peter Rudge,
the Stones are getting tired of
concerts, and would like to try
something new. Rudge says the
details should be worked out in
another month or two.
Medical researchers in Munich,
Germany, have reported t h a t
avant garde classical music may
be more damaging to the physiol-
ogy than rock and roll. As re-
ported in the New Scientist ma-
gazine, "60 per cent of the mu-
sicians in three orchestras suffer
debiliating symptoms when they
have to play the works of Stock-
hausen, or Boluez." According to
the report, the rehearsals and
performances of such music af-
flicts the players with insomnia,

diarrhea, cardiac problems and
stomach ulcers.
John Lennon is already at work
on a new album. Lennon's latest
L.P. "Mind Games," has been
out only three weeks. The Roll-
ing Stones have already record-
ed their next album. The Stones
were recently reported to be re-
cording with Billy Preston and
others. Joe Cocker, who hasn't
put together a new album in ages,
is working on one now in Lon-
don. Cocker is recording there
with Henry McCulloch, Chris
Stewart, Jih Price and Jim Car-
stein, and is reported to have re-
corded some Randy Newman

tunes.
All four members of The Who
were arrested in Montreal after
completely destroying their hotel
suite. The group agreed to pay
the damages,
Regular or Styling
We Do What You Want
B-M BARBERS
& STYLISTS
MICHIGAN UNION
BARBER SHOP

_ .._ _ ._

LOUIS FALCO
DANCE COMPANY
"Most exciting to emerge dur-
ing the lost decade" NY TIMES
Totally Ncontemporary 0Energetic
Stylish
THE DETROIT
INSTITUTE OF ARTS
AUDITORIUM, FRI.,
JAN. 25, 8:30 P.M.
Founders Society Concert Series.
Edith J. Freeman, Chairm-n
Art Institute Ticket Office
(831-4678), (831-0360),
All Hudson's $6, $5, $4

GRADUATE STUDENTS

WELCOME!
GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR
WEDNESDAY
8-10 p.m.
West Conference
Room, 4th Floor
RACKHAM

Crisie , A s -ra- p-.
$5-$4-$3 ON SALE NOW
specil guest strr BROTHES BOYD W LIAMS
Sees & Crofts newest album '- " 'N C HID
avoilab'e rno,
JONI .ITH L
Hill Aud., Sat., Jan. 26, on sce new
DUKE ELLIGTO 9
Power Center, Wed., Jan. 30, on kale Jon. 15
ALL ABOVE CONCERTS on sale now at Michigan Union
11-5:30 pm. daily, Sat. 1-4 p.m. Sorry, No Personal Checks

Daily Photo by DAVID MARGOLICK
Arnott's marionettes bring
classical drama to life

1

* * ir

Marionettes, those creatures
usually associated with light en-
tertainment, take on a serious
role tonight when noted British
puppeteer Peter Arnott p u l11 s
their _ strings. Arnott's puppets
will perform the fiery works of
Aeschylus' "Oresteia," Euripides'
"Cyclops" and Marlowe's "Doc-
tor Faustus" in the R. C. Audi-
torium, E.Q. tonight through Sat.
night.
Classical drama is not easily
duplicated on stage by an ordin -
ary dramatic group. Arnott's
marionettes are ideal for bring-
ing this grand subject to lift.
Prof. Louis Orlin of the Resi-
dential College says that the
marionettes bring the classics to
areas like small towns t h a t
could never hope to see a Greek
play. "Hi- can take his marion-
ettes anywhere. They are a great
teaching instrument," Orlin ex-
plains.
Prof. Gerald F.CElse, directr
of the, Center for Coordination .if
Ancient and Modern Studies first
developed the idea of bringing
Dr. Arnott to the campus dur-
ing discussions with R i c h a r d
Meyer, director of theatre pro-
grams. The Residential College

under the direction of Prof. Or-
lin joined the project. Meyers
hopes that more joint ventures
among various university depart-
ments will result from their in-
novative idea.
Arnott, currently drama pro-
fessor at Tufts University orig-
ino)t ed The Marionette Theatre
of Peter Arnott in 1948. He tour-
ed works from a Greek and Ro-
m -m repertory to schools and
uiversities throughout England
until his departure for the U.S.
in 1958.
His many performances in m i-
jor U.S. universities including

Harvard, Michigan, Wellesley
and Amherst, and in Canada have
brought wide critical acclaim.
Critics cite the rapt attention of
his audience in response to Inis
skill.
Dr. Arnott opens his unique
set of performances with "Age-
memnon," the first section of
the trilogy "Oresteia." T h e
next two parts, "Libation Bear-
ers" and "Eumenides" will be
performed Thursday night. Euri-
pedes' "Cyclops" will be Fri-
day's show, and Marlowe's "Doc-
tor Faustus" will complete the
series Sat. evening.

NEW WORLD CINEMA SHOWCASE
Fellini's
Wed. & Thurs.
Jan. 16 & 17
7 & 9 p.m.
NATURAL SCIENCE AUD.-Central U of M campus

"T TTTTTTi
y
k
J
r r
i
a
a
a
a
a
k*** it t k

.4
.4c

603 E. Liberty
DIAL 665-6290

.......

Next Week--Mon.-Bunuel's BELLE DE JOUR
Tue. and Wed.-Costa Gavras' STATE OF SIEGE
Thur.--Dalton Trumbo's JOHNNY GOT HIS GUN

Jan. 28 & 29-George Roy Hill's BUTCH
CASSIDY and the SUNDANCE KID
Jon. 30 & 31-Truffout's SHOOT THE
PIANO PLAYER

-~**.t***************************************** **********************

-4 OPEN DAILY
* 12:45
* SHOWS AT1,
3, 5, 7, & 9
ENDS
THURS.:
"Jima
Hendrix"
at 1,3,
5, 7, & 9
, START;
THUR2SD
DIAL 668-6416
4-

TONIGHT!
MARIONETTE THEATRE OF PETER ARNOTTY
Aeschylus' ORESTEIA (part one)
AGAMEMNON
Residential College Auditorium-8:00 P.M.
East Quad
$1.50 general admission. Tickets available PTP Ticket Office
10 a m.-1 p.m., 2 p.m.-5 p.m. & at door. Further information
e call 764-0450.
Po><-s--y-><-> -o->o-y <-><-0--

This

Is what

they stuffed buildingos with
in ancient EgYy~t.
. ".' + R eN 4
w #d,"' s t
*.4 '.$~>.a
. s>.. .-
aK y/ .. . q y ' < o4" aT a" .:?s
.Ar 1' vN" y. g °'.'S ~ o : A ,, S~g d " j F .

/ mi

1214 South
University
ENDS
WED,!
"Sleuth"
PLUS
"Discrete
Charm of
the
Bourgeoisie"
open 1 p.m.
OPEN DAILY
12:45
SHOWS AT 1,
3, 5, 7 & 9 P.M,

I

You Should

Seef

tIe (100od s tff.

Quarried stone was scarce in ancient Egypt.
When new buildings were erected, facings
from old ones were torn off and used as fill
for walls.
That's why art from this unique period
exists today, 3000 vears later.
The art was inspired by Akhenaten, the
rebel Pharaoh who commanded the worship
of only one aod 14 centuries before Christ.
The stylized portrayals of the past aive way

Come see these objects in the exhibition
The New York Times calls . . . "a blockbuster
in every sense of the world. The objects are
first rate, the choice is extraordinary for its
range and representation . . . from eminent
museums and private collections around the
world."
Come to The. Detroit Institute of Arts.
9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday through
Sunday. Tuesday eveninas until 9 p.m.

DIAL 665-6290

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