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April 07, 1974 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, April 7, 19-74

THE ICHIAN AILYSunay, pri 7, 97i

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Profs to get grades

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Alleged 'Black Hand'
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OFFICE HOURS
CIRCULATION - 764-0558
COMPLAINTS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS
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DEADLINE 2 days in advance by 3 p.m.
Friday at 3 p.m. for Tuesday's paper

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(Continued from Page 1)
be cast at evaluation boxes in the
Fishbowl, the Undergraduate Li-+
brary, the Modern Language Build-
ing, Physics and Astronomy Build-
ing, and the Natural Science Audi-
torium.
LSA-SG will tabulate and publish+
the results, giving each professor
an average grade for each course,l
and a cumulative grade point av-9
erage.
Transcripts will be sent to the
professors' parents.
THE EVALUATION sheet offers
some "tips" on grading:
"Grade your professor on this
five-point scale. Remember, like
student grading, faculty evaluation
need not be done on any 'objective
basis.'
"Do not use any absolute scale-
professors should compete with one
another for their grades. Perhaps
a 'C' curve would be appropriate."
JONATHAN KLEIN, president of
LSA-SG, calls it a "taste of their
own medicine."
He said the idea was conceived
during the LSA-SG's work with the
Graduation Requirements Commis-
sion last year.
Klein had written a short memo
to the commission during one of
their more trying periods, propos-
ing a grading system for faculty,
including provisions for "proba-
tion" for those faculty members
who fall below a 2.0 average.
THE COMMISSION, according to
Klein, grumbled a bit, "looked at
it, and did not think too highly
of it."
THE ISSUE was resurrected in
December after the LSA govern-
ing faculty rejected a college gov-

ernanceproposal which would have
given equal representation to stu-
dents.
An angry LSA-SG m e m b e r,
Chuck Barquist, thought the group
might consider the faculty grading
system in earnest. And so they
did.
Ten thousand evaluation forms
have been distributed around cam-
pus for the 12,000 LSA studentsl
and, said Klein, "if we run low, we
can print more."
HE SAID he feels the project
will be more successful than the
usual end-of-term evaluations be-
cause this one, like the students'
evaluations, requires no lengthy

County Commissioner
terms jail firings illegal

commentaries-simply a choice of
an A, B, C, D, or E grade.
The evaluation sheet states the
philosophy of the grading system
in lofty terms:
"It is well known that professors
suffer from a lack of uni-dimen-
sional, semi-arbitrary evaluation,
that is, grading. This survey is an
attempt to remedy this deficiency
by providing them with the kind of
feedback on their performance that
they need."
But perhaps Klein expressed the.
true purpose and intent of the fac-
ulty g r a d i n g more succinctly:
"Knock 'em dead."

by Mexican
MEXICO CITY (P) - some 50
persons, including the mayor and
former police chief of a south-
ern Mexican city, have been
arrested in an investigation of a
gang believed responsible for be-
tween 200 and 300 killings, police
said last night.
The gang, which officials said
operated in and around the town
of Tapachula 550 miles southeast
of Mexico City, was known as
The Black Hand.
ABEL GOPAR, who took over
as the police chief in Tapachula
when the investigations began,
said in a telephone interview that
members of the gang murdered
neighboring landowners to get
their property and killed laborers
when they demanded to be paid.
Other police sources said the
gang also had been flying weap-
ons into neighboring Guatemala.
Tapachula, a city of 45,000 in-
habitants, is only a few miles
from the Guatemalan border.

police
Gopar said five brothers were
arrested last February in con-
nection with the murders, but a
sixth is still at large. He said
police found the bodies of three
victims and a large quantity of
arms and ammunition-including
submachine guns and grenades-
on the brothers' range.
Other victims were believed
thrown into the sea.
GOPAR SAID the only person
formally charged so far is the
mayor of Tapachula, Fernando
Acosta, who allegedly master-
minded the murder of a news-
paperman who crusaded against
the gang.
Others being held include Tap-
achula's former chief of police
and the head of the detective
squad. Gopar became police chief
on March 1 and said he had to
replace all 20 of his detectives
and even police secretaries be-
cause of their involvement with
the gang.

(Continued from Page 1)
project director without consent of
the County Commissioners.
She a d d e d that the decision
would be up to her subcommittee,
and that they would meet tomor-
row afternoon to consider whether
to accept Spickard's appointment.
Technically, she explained, an in-
terim project director has not yet
been approved.
Taylor said her subcommittee
would be particularly interested in
finding out why Spickard, rather
than a person with a closer work-
ing knowledge of the program, had
been chosen for the position.
"In Lansing they told us it would
be preferable to have someone ap-
pointed who has been working in
the project on a day-to-day basis,
someone as close to the action as
possible," she explained.

THE PROJECT Community and
Outreach resignation statement,
meanwhile, criticized Postill's in-
terference: "We denounce and pro-
test your actions," the letter said,
" and can no longer in good
conscience act as liaisonsrto supply
tutors and auxiliaries to the In-
mate Rehabilitation Program to
fuel your political manipulations."
The letter voiced "regret that
the inmates will be the ones to
suffer in the end" and said those
volunteers presently serving as
volunteers would remain until the
end of the jail classroom semester.
In conjunction with s i m i 1 a r
charges leveled last week by the
fired staff, Harris responded then
by saying, "time will demonstrate
that Postill is paying more than
lip service to the rehabilitative
ideal, and I think that time will
be the only answer to that charge."

'Picketers defy order

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JACOBSON'S OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY NIGHT
UNTIL 9:00 P.M.; SATURDAY UNTIL 5:30 P.M.
Miss J takes it from the top
in her cotton T-shirt. Black
backdrop for graffiti
handscreen drawings by
celebrated artist, Peter Max.
Crewneck, short sleeve ease
to pair with your pants
and skirts. Sizes S-M-L, $11

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STEVE'S LUNCH
GOOD FOOD AT LOW, LOW PRICES
We Specialize in Home Cooking
FAST & FRIENDLY SERVICE
BY MR. & MRS. LEE
STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 S. UNIVERSITY
tel. 769-2288

(Continued from Page 1) {
the state. The police, when they'
looked at it, said they would not
take any action unless there was
a specific enforcement clause,"
Bullard said.
In a similar case last fall, in-
volving A&P stores boycott, an or-
der limiting the number of VFW
picketers to two was rescinded. As
a result approximately 80 persons
who had been arrested for disobey-
ing it were released.
"I WOULD LIKE to introduce a
resolution that would ban non-
UFW grapes and Gallo wine from.
the city," Kozachenko said yester-
day.
Gallo wine has come under
strong fire recently for using
"scab"--non-union--grape s.
"I think it's very important that
students, who have incredible pow-
er, help as far as making the
Gallo boycott work," Kozachenko
continued. "It's asking very little
to ask people not to buy Gallo
wine."

past," she said. "We're going to
picket three days a week. Our
strength is really growing, and
with the nicer weather and the end
of school we expect more people
will have both the time and the
inclination to help out."
Wrigley's managers refused com-
ment on the boycott, but despite
the protest outside, a banner in
the store window proclaimed proud-
ly, "We sell one hundred per cent
union picked grapes."
UFW members claim that the
grapes are either picked by an in-
effective Teamsters-backed union,
or are foreign non-union grapes.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume txxxtv, Number 150
Sunday, April 7,'1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Micbhin. News phone
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Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
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Jacobsori
PLEASE PARK IN THE ADJOINING ENCLOSED
MAYNARD STREET AUTO RAMP.
JACOBSON'S WILL GLADLY VALIDATE YOUR
PARKING TICKET.

FALL '74
university

towers

APARTMENTS
South University at Forest Ave.
ON CAMPUS
walk to everything-no car or parking expenses necessary
."2 blocks from the Diag
. 8 month Lease
Nliilf, * "Air-Conditioned
. Fully Carpeted
* Piano and Recreation Room
1 Laundry Facilities
re . Study Room
f f . Heated Swimming Pool
/ " 24 Hour Maintenance
and Security
" Luxurious Lobby
. Weekly Housekeeping

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