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April 04, 1974 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-04-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, April 4, 1974

NOON LUNCHEON-Fri., Apr. 5]Speakers link coal dust with
SOUP AND SANDWICH-40cbal g sene
(speaker to be announced)bs

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By SARA RIMER
United M i n e Workers (UMW)
President Arnold Miller yesterday
cabled his praise of Dr. Donald
Rasmussen and M. H. Ross for
their efforts to dramatize the link
between coal dust and black lung
disease at a conference here.
Miller, who was unable to attend
yesterday's public health confer-"
ence entitled "Appalachian Coal'
Miners: An Endangered Species?"
due to "urgent union business,"
telegrammed, "Like hundreds of
thousands of other miners, I have
black lung, and thanks to educa-
tion I received from Dr.. Rasmus-1
sen and his colleagues, no one can
ever tell me that my troubles come
from cigarette smoking or some
other disease not connected with
my occupation."
Rasmussen, chief of the Pulmu-

nary Section of the Appalachian
Regional H o s p i t a l in Beckley,
W.Va., is well known for his work
with black lung, a miners' disease.
Ross is the administrator of the
UMW health clinic in Fairmont,
W.Va. Both spoke at yesterday's'
conference.
MILLER'S CABLE emphasized,
"It is vitally important that stu-
dents of public health hear what
Dr. Rasmussen and Ross have to
say, particularly now when other
physicians are attempting to mini-
mize the significance of this di-
sease.".
Public health students organized
the conference, to counter claims
made here last December by Dr.
Keith Morgan that cigarette smok-
ing ranked as a more important
factor than coal dust in causing

MINI-COURSE
Mathematical Theories of Plant Development
University Course 413
Subjects that will be discussed include mathematical description of
root and leaf growth, models of branching. structure and the mathe-
matics of phyllotaxis, diffusion-reaction mechanisms of morphogenesis,
etc.
The course will be taught by an* eminent visiting biologist,: Dr.
Aristid Lindenmayer, Professor of Theoretical Biology at the University
of Utrecht, Holland.
CLASS SCHEDULE:
LECTURES: April 9, 12, 16, 19 from 12 noon-2:00 p.m. in Room 1139
Nat. Set.
DISCUSSION: April 4, 11, 18 from 12 noon-Z.:00 p m. in Room;2023
Nat. Set.
Registration in 2039 Nat. Sc.

lung diseases in miners. During
that lecture, Morgan was critical
of the safeguards granted miners
by the 1969 Coal Mine Health and
Safety Act.
ROSS PEPPERED his attack on
Morgan's claims with personal ex-
periences and miners' quotes.
"If you care to talk about coal
miners, Dr. Morgan, you better
know your people," .Ross said.
"I'm talking about human beings
who dig for their living under-
ground, to provide air conditioning
and heating for Americans."
Citing Morgan's role as the di-
rector of the Appalachian Labora-
tory for Occupational Respiratory
Disease, Ross blasted Morgan's. re-
marks as an "insensitive attack on
coal miners' benefits."
ROSS CONTINUED, "For years,
most doctors were assuring miners
that coal dust was among the least
harmful dust while miners were
hardly unaware of shortness of
breath, black, spittle, and miners'
asthma."
Ross read a letter from a Ken-
tucky miner that said, "Our days
are lived in darkness. Our lungs
are the color of mashed oak ber-
ries. We breathe black spit."
Ross stated, "In the last ten
years recognition of black lung
has been increasing. The "in"
thing now is to hold meetings on
it."
THE CONFERENCE concluded
with a round of questions and ans-
wers, during which one audience
member rose and gave an elo-
quent five-minute defense of Mor-
gan's statements and actions.
The room grew quiet as Dr. Rod-
ney Bentz described Morgan as
"a humanitarian . . . who has de-
voted his lifetime to serving hu-
manity as a researcher and a
physician." Bentz, who appeared
to be most critical of Ross, praised
Rasmussen's work in the same
terms he used for Morgan's.
The audience remained silent as
Bentz stopped speaking. The ses-
sion then dispersed.
The University's 5,000th degree
in library science was awarded in
May 1973. The first library science
degree was conferred in June 1927.

Daily Photo by TOM GOTTLIEB
UNITED MINE WORKERS clinic administrator M. H. Ross (left) and black lung expert Dr. Donad
Rasmussen field questions during a conference yesterday at the school of Public Health Auditorium.
WASSON RESIGNS:
Postill f IreSthree a t,,jail

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sessssss s

1

(Continued from Page 1)
adding, "In terms of Paul being a
tool with black inmates, that's to-
tally true. I looked for a black man
who could work in a jail whose in-
mates are mostly black."
Postill immediately appointed
his Undersheriff James Spickard
as acting director of the rehabili-
tation program, a job which Was-
son held in addition to Jail Ad-
ministrator.
HE ALSO hired as acting Jail
Administrator Frank Donley, a
former Inmate-Service worker and
an ex-convict with a long arrest
record.
Donley's record includes four ar-
rests for breaking and entering,
one for armed robbery, and convic-
tions for armed robbery and for3
failing to register for the draft. He
was released from from prison in
1962. His only arrest since then
was in August, 1967 when he re-
ceived a misdemeanor conviction
for public intoxication following an
automobile accident.
IN HIS statement, Postill said
that (yesterday's) actions will not

WHAT'S A
STEAK SC4?

I

I

"FOOLISH AND FIENDISH"
EMU PLAYERS SERIES
S PROUD TO PRESENT
Harold Piuter's COMEDY OF MENACE

VOTE
IN RACKHAM STUDENT GOVERNMENT ELECTIONS
TO BE ELECTED: President, Vice. President, 15 Representatives
ELIGIBLE TO VOTE:, Every student enrolled in Rackharn
DATES: March 25-29lnd April 1-5, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
LOCATION OF POLLS:

THE
BIRTHDAY:
PA RTY
Mar.29, 30,31 Apr.3, 4,516
QUIRK AUDITORIUM

Mon., Mar. 25-Rackham Building
Tues., Mar. 26-Grad Library
Wed., Mar. 27-Fishbowl
Thurs., Mar. 28-Engin. Arch
Fri., Mar. 29-Education School
Mon., Apr. 1-Rackham Building

Tues., Apr. 2-Grad Library
Wed., Apr. 3-Fishbowl
Thurs., Apri. 4-Kresge Library
Lobby
Fri., Apr. 5--Rackham Building

effect the basic policies at the jail had been planning to leave the
or within the department. We will program for personal reasons with-
continue our program of making in the next month. But Reno said
the jail as humane as we can. We she had planned to stay through
will continue . . . our efforts to the summer until Postill made a
bring the best possible corrections decision to move ahead immedi-
program into the jail. . ately with plans -to implement a
The Inmate Rehabilitation Pro- Residential Center.
gram was originally conceived by THE CENTER was long in the
Molly Reno while she was still an planning, and was viewed as a
undergraduate at the University. natural outgrowth of the jail re-
After an attempt to implement it habilitation programs in a less in-
on a small scale was cut short by stitutionally confining setting.
then-Sheriff Douglas Harvey, she "We objected to its iiediate
received a federal fund late in implementation,"'says Renl. "We
1971, and with Sheriff Postill's ap- felt it was too soon, and. Postill
proval, the program went 'into was seeking public relations at the
effect in January of 1972. expense of an effective .program.
With input from Wasson and the For instance, we were behind in
two other ex-convicts on the origi- our counseling b e c a u s e Frank
nal staff, the program design was .(Donley) had just taken 'two weeks
closely in line with the 1972 Michi- off without telling anyone.
' gan Commission on Corrections' According .to Wasson, Undersher-
suggestions for a model institution. iff Spickard had been a spurce of
WORKING IN cooperation with tension since late January when
local judges, convicted local felons Postill gave him an office next to
local judgescdtonctelalfelons Wasson's in the jail. Postill said
were sentenced to one year terms he sent Spickard down here be-
in the jail and the program, rather cue etSikr onhr e
than th ec epo some of the white deputies
sentnce tyicaly lngty piso had said they woudn't, work for
Although there were fewer par- ;ad because I'm black, Wasson
ticipants in recent months, as many sTHE CLIMACTIC incdent ead-
as 30 of the jail's 130 or so inmatesi yesterday's even1s appar-
have taken part at once in thentoyesters ron n ore
program. It included classes which entlycenters around. norder
coul lea toa hih scool Spickard gave last weekend. He
coud lad o ahig scoolde-had a deputy call' Manildi Ito tell
gree, day-to-day counseling by in-her tht there wouldbe a required
mate-workers, work and study-re- meeting of the rehabilitation staff
lease programs and, after release, the following Monday.
follow-up programs of job place- The fired members of the staff,
ment and family counseling. in turn, claim that they had al-
In addition, Wasson moved to ready made other appointments
humanize the atmosphere of the and that on short notice they were
jail by instituting medical serv- unable to break them and there-
ices, upgrading the food, repaint- fore did not show up.
ing the jail, eliminating arbitrary IT IS ON that basis, according to
discipline, replacing most of the Postill, that they were fired.
original deputies with trained cor-'"Molly Reno had been directly in-
rections personnel and providing subordinate to the sheriff. She re-
each cell with a television. fused to have a staff meeting with
ALTHOUGH BOTH sides say (Spickard) where he would have
tensions have long been building, 'presented vacation data to all em-
the drama of yesterday's actions ployes."
apparently came as a surprise, According to Postill, he wanted
particularly to Postill. According to retain Larry Hunter, but w"ien
to Hunter, who Postill asked ito. Hunter refused yesterday morming
stay on, the sheriff asked him as to talk to the undersheriff,' Postill
late as 10:00 a.m. yesterday: fired him. Manildi was then also
"What's going on? I don't under- fired for "violation of rules end
stand what's happened all of a regulations" centering around an
sudden." alleged failure to turn in time
Both Reno and Manildi say they slips and vacation and sick days.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Thursday, April 4 . gular Momentum," P-A Bldg. Colloq.
Day Calendar Rm., 4pm.
Maternal, Child Hth. Film: "A Boy W. W. Cook Lectures on American
Named Terry Egan," HV3042 SPH I, Institutions: N. Glazer, "The White
noon. Ethnic' Reaction: Iliusion or Reality?"
Future worlds: A. Meyer, "The Con- Aud. 3, MLB, 4:15 pm.
structure of the Political Revolution," American Heritage Night: New |ng-
Nat. Sci. Aud., 3 pm. land menu, League Cafeteria, 5 pm.
MHRI: D. Braginsky, Fairfield U, Women's Studies Films: "Miss 'Good-
!"Politics of Psycho Diagnosis," 1057 all & the Wild Chimpanzees," "Doro-
Mental Hith. Res. Inst., 3:45 pm. thea Lange," Lec. Rm. 1, MLB, 7:30 pm.
Ctr. Early Childhood Development, Law School Student Senate: "The
Education: H. Watts, U of Wisconsin, Rights of the Accused," 120 Hutchins
"Negative Tax Experiment: Implica- Hall, 7:30 pm.
tions for Families," Schloring Aud., Ctr. Study of Higher Education: A.
SEB, 4 pm. Chickering, Empire State Col., "Em-
Physics: E. Marshalak, U of Notre pire State After Two Years: The Open
Dame, "Nuclear Rotation at High An- & Non-Traditional Univ. in Practice,"
_____----- .----- Assembly Hail, Rackham, 8 pm.
Ctr. Continuing Education of Wo-
men: "A Conversation with Couples:
Working It Out 'Together when -,the
Woman Returns to School or Work,"
W Conf. Rm., Rackham Bldg., 8 pm.
School of Music: S. Baptista trum-
pet, Cady Mus. Rm. Stearns Bldg., 8
pm.
School of Music: ; Arts Chorale, J.
Featuring works Oge' cnutoHllAd 8 pm.

For information, call 763-0109, weekday afternoons
FK~ '___________---__

8:00 P.M.

$2.00

Dial 487-1221 for reservations
BOX OFFICE OPEN: 11:45-4:30
NOON-8:30 (performance dates)

U

;I

POETRY READING
SHARON LEITER
author of
Lady and the Bailiff of Time
JOAN JANIAK,

'

LAST

3

DAYS

u

I

KATHY
and MAR
UNION

KOZACHEN KO
Y LEATHERMAN
April 5
.00 p.m.
GALLERY
ch. Union-Tues.-Sot. 10-5

at i st floor Mi

r

NO GIMMICKS-Just Good Old Fashioned Bargains Because of
the thousands of items which we carry-it would be impossible
to mark down each item-all regular price merchandise will
be discounted 20% at the Registers. Special priced items or
items with a Larger discount will be tagged. This sale is
ULRICH'S way of thanking our Regular customers and intro-
ducing ourselves to the many new people who might not of
heard of us-HAVE FUN-

F BOOKSTORE
549 EAST UNIVERSITY
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

IL

i

-F

300,000

INVENTORY

SALE

by Jose Limon,
Doris Humphrey,
Elizabeth Bergmann,
Vera Embreee,
and students

People! Music! Food!
BACH CLUB
presents
Judith KEMPH, flute
Kenneth VOLKERS, piano
Christopher KANTER, flute
Jill WEISS, flute
WITH PIECES BY s
HINDEMITH, DEBUSSY, >
MOZART, JEHAN ALAIN,
MR. HILL, TELEMANN,
BOISMORTI ER

INVOLVING EVERY ARTICLE IN OUR STORE ON BOTH FLOORS EXCEPT TEXTBOOKS AND CALCULATORS

d

SAVE 20 to

50'

GREAT SALE
n Avc

UNIVERSITY DANCERS
.a DfsAI D fLUMTED

* ON EVERY DOLLAR YOU SPEND 1

I

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