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March 29, 1974 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-03-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAiLY

Friday, March 29, 1974

TH--H-A ALYF-ay ac 2,17

LSA denies tenure

"THE BANK DICK"
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HUTCHINS HALL 100
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I

(continued from Page 1)
phasis often meant being "well-
dressed and not publishing."
A new chairman. Russell Fraser,
so"eht -to emphasize scholarship in
an attempt to rejivenate a facilty
slinping in prestige among its col-
leagues across the nation. One
faculty member says the resilt of
this was a "frenzied effort toward
national visibility."
A shift in emphasis had occurred
and this newer policy was con-
timued under the guidance of John
Styan. An example of an action
Fraser took and Styan continued
to support was reducing a profes-
sor's course load to allow more
time for scholarly pursuits.
Also at play was a new uneasi-
ness felt by educational institutions
generally. The 1960's had been a
period of growth and of hiring, but
the 1970's has already seen con-
tractions and budgetary strains,
Saccording to Assistant to the Dean
CEdward Dougherty.
Improving a department cnder
these circumstances has been dif-
ficilt, says one senior English pro-
fessor.
TN SUCH TIMES, disagreements
over which departmental policies to
follow become more serious.
Before the tenure nrocedre got
too far this past fall the English
department asked LSA whether
economic factors were going to
play a role in possibly limiting the
number of candidates the collage
Ewould ultimately a p p r o v e for
t yire.
The denartment was informed
that such factors were not at work.
E n g I i s h Executive Committee
member and Associate Chairman
Jay Robinson took the answer at
"face value" and believes eco-
nomic factors did not enter into
recent tenure decisions. He ad-
mits though that while criteria
ihave remained the same, the
standards on those criteria have'
risen.
Prof. Robert Super, another Eng-
lish Executive Committee mem-
ber, who was a past member of
the LSA Executive Committee feels
that it was "baloney" to have
said that every capable tenure'
candidate would be promoted. "It's
part of the American cultural
myth that everyone can make it,"
he says.
"IT IS A competitive system,"
Super adds. "The college Execu-
tive Committee would never say,
they would only accept a certain
number of candidates" for tenure,
but that is the reality, he main-
tains.
Super claims that with that in
mind the department Executive
Committee named six candidates
as the "outside number" that the
college would accept.
The department Executive Com-
mittee nominated its six candidates.
to go on in the tenure process. At3
that point Styan, acting with the
"well-being of the staff" under
consideration, exercised his legal'

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nrerngnti-e to name two additional
r'fpssors, Cathcart and Reaske,
to the recommended list.
IN A LETTER to Styan dated
r Dec. 12 which circulated through-
out the department, Super angrily
rea-ted to the chairman's moe.
'"Thetprerogative you cinis
t one that has never been ;-sed by
a chairman of this department in
the 2 years of my ass )iatin
1with it,' 'he wrote. "It Teens to
me, like ANY single-handed action
of a chairman, an extraordinariy
dangerous move for a chairman to
lmake."
With that letter Super tempo-
rarily resigned from the depart-
ment Executive Committee. He
felt that adding two more nam s
just let the college make the de-
t oartment's decisions. "The m..re
neople we recommend, the more
we are 'waiving our power of
:hoice to the Executive Commitee
of the College," he wrote.
STYAN AND Robinson believe
that the six original candidates
were not affected by the move,
but one of the six deeply resented
the action, feeling that the addi-
tion of two more candidates by
the chairman implied that the
original recommendations w e r e
done sloppily.
Whether or not that was the
case, the department underwent a
serious split.,Styan was "very,
very surprised" by the reaction to
his move. Professors either sup-
ported or opposed Styan's action
on one of two grounds. First, on
whether he had the authority to'
add the additional candidates and
second, on the candidates them-
selves.
Neither of these two assistant
professors received tenure from
the college.
Another i s s u e of importance
plaguing the department is where
power should lie-with the chair-
man, the Executive Committee or
the general membership of the de-
partment. Styan's recent actions
highlighted this dispute. Still an-
other issue is the power of depart-
ment vis a vis LSA.
THE NET AFFECT has been, in
the words of one young professor,
"a missing sense of continuity and
concern in the department."
The Super-Styan dispute was
real even if department feelings
do not normally run that high.
Super had called for Styan's resig-
nation. The minutes of the general
meeitng of the department on Jan.
10 reveal that the discussion of
promotions was "long, complex,,
often personal and rancorous."
A subsequent petition, however,
signed by 75 per cent of depart-
ment members asked for "an at-
tempt by all our colleagues to put
aside personal feelings of hostility
and to move towards attitudes of
trust and respect."
PEACE MOVES toward Super
were made by the department
Executive Committee - the Com-
mittee Super had left.
By late F e b r u a r y, however,
Styan had announced his inten-tion
to leave the Unviersity and accept
a prestigious professorial chair at
the University of Pittsburgh.
LSA administrators, in the mean-
time acknowledge that the college
can be very choosy in awarding
tenure to prevent the accumula-
tion of academic dead wood. Also,
to save money, the college will not
necessarily allow- the posts of de-
parted faculty members to be
filled.
At issue is whether the college,
by raising its standards on the cri-
teria for granting tenure, is re-
placing its old system with a corn-
petive system.
This replacement is by no means
a stated policy, but the new sys-
tem would operate anyway as fac-
ulty members engaged in the ten-
ure granting process of LSA know
they can raise standards for tenure
with so many top-notch teachers

entering the job market.
So while Rhodes may be correct
in denying that financial consider-
ations affect tenure decisions in
individual cases, the new buyer's
market atmosphere does permeate6
the decision-making process.
The real victims of this process
then are the supposedly qualified
teachers who do not receive tenure
because of hard times' here and
because of the tight job market
in their field.
44

,16

From

LS&A

Scholarship

Recipients of

LSA

LSA SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT!

Endowment Fund

1973.

Awards,

1973-74

1. ALDRICH FUND
SCHOLARSHIPS:
Lissandrello, Patricis M.f
Stoller, Walter A.
2. HERBERT E. BOYNTON
SCHOLARSHIPS:
Bauman, Richard K.
Norris, Maryel A.
Post, Cheryl I.
Wing, Nicole T.
Wright, Valerie G.
3. DR. & MRS. O. B. CAMPBELL
SCHOLARSHIP:
Roberts, Glen T.
4. CLASS OF 1926 MEMORIAL
SCHOLARSH IP:
Smith, Michael R.
5. MARTHA ROBINSON
HAWKINS SCHOLARSHIP:
Lou, Jacqueline J.
6. JAMES B., CHARLES J. &
MARGARET E. HUNT
SCHOLARSHIP
Murphy, Janet M.
7. SIMOM MANDLEBAUM
SCHOLARSHIP:
Roney, Mitchell J.
8. FANNY RANSOM-MARSH
SCHOLARSHIP:
Alpert, Barbara
9. FRANCES HINKLEY MOORED
SCHOLARSHIP:
VZL....J rvw A

Abel, Susan A.
Abrahamsen, Maria B.
Alexander, Francine J.
Ackenhusen, John
Aretakis, Harry J.
Aronowitz, Robert A.
Banks, Cheryl J.
Bell, Michael B.
Bennett, Debra K.
Bialek, Barry B.
Blugerman, Daniel H.
Blumenthal, Michael S.
Bonnevaux, M. Beatriz
Borowec, Lawrence W.
Brabandt, E. Charles
Brackett, Linda
Budzenski, Carol A.
Buckins, Dolores
Burr,, Adrienne
Butler, Gloria L.
Carlson, JoAnn M.
Carr, Susan M.
Chang, Margaret
Damken, Peter W.
Dang, Chuc V.
Dang, Chi V.-
DeParry, Astrid
Delahanty, Sandra
Derum, Linda A.
DeVine, Clifford J.
Drewniak, Diane E.
Donowitz, Arlene J.
Douglas, Richard H.
Drewniak, Diane E.
Dreyer, Margaret M.
Dykstra, Audrey H.
Eamon, Mary K.,

Elahi, Elham
Ellsworth, Gail P.
Epps, Marvin
Erskine, Beverly A.
Fabrizio, Paulette
Fejes, Fred A.
Fischer, Brian E.
Fleissner, Richard G.
Frederick, Harold M.
Gaughan, Joseph P.
Geddes, Janice R.
Goldstein, Robert F.
Gonik, Barnard
Gordon, Randolph I.
Griffin, Mary K.
Grondin, James P.
Haar, Paul S.
Hanlon, Russell J.
Haque, Khondaker E.
Hefner, Robert W.
Heilig, Gary L.
Hendrick, Pamela R.
Hillier, Mary A.
Hollander, Phyllis
Hyman, Jeremy S.
Irrer, Kathryn M.
Isenberg, Jacqueline K.
Jamison, Linda D.
Jensen, Theresa A.
Johnson, David C.
Jones, Genevieve B.
Jordan, Aleta
Kaminski, Rosalien
Kantor, David
Karpen, Judith T.
Karmauski, Karen K.
Kauzlarich, Kenneth N.

--74
Kerr, Barbara J.
Keskitalo, Carol L.
Klein, Mitchell A.
Knoblock, Carolyn J.
Konwinski, Julian
Kowalski, Cecelia R.
Kozachenko, Kathleen A.
Kravitz, Susan L.
Kriechman, Avron M.
Lancaster, Martha E.,
Lange, Margaret A.
Lazaroff, Paul H.
Lefko, Cindy G.
Lennox, Patricia A.,
Lewandowski, Robert G.
Liebman, Jed A.
Lipson, Gary D.
Lunardi, Ivaldo A.
Lyles, Linda L.

COmittee:
Medical
Technologists
Awards,
gers, Philip E.A
ers, Tracey W. 1973-74
an, Allen D.
, Deborah R.
kowski, Maryann Brickel, Beverly
age, Tamara Howes, Patricia
ck, Donald G. lngebrigtsen, Nan
ack, Mark 1.
wart. Cathv J Keskitalo, Carol

Rod(
Rog(
Rose
Ross
Rut&
Save
Schi
Schl
Schv

i
;,
.
it
!f
i'
i' i
43
j i III
,f
",

Madry, Alan R.
Manning, Susan J.
Malone, Thomas M.
Mauch, Dennis E.
Maurer, Gertrud E.
McKee, Ralph R.
Micallef, Janet R.
Michalski, Colette M.
Miller, Laura A.
Nealon, William
Nissen, Elizabeth A.
Norman, Donald Anthony
O'Connell, Dianne B.
Ovshinsky, Pamela S.
Pancioli, Patricia A.
Parzuchowski, Mark E.
Praeger, Jane S.
Reder, Anthony T.

w~i Y~.r , I r .
Scovie, Janet L.
Seigel, Judy A.
Seiler, Lawrie K.
Senko, Joseph R.
Shattow, Michael
Shelton, Betty R.
Shigetani, Leslie M.
Sieferd, Craig B.
Singer, Thea L.
Spolar, Stephen B.
Steele, Shelley J.
Stern, Darlene E.
Stern, Martin S.
Stober, Janet J.
Szelestey, Susanna K.
Toltziz, Philip H.
Toms, Mary S.
Traynor, Mary E.
Voiles, Teresa M.
Walkowski, Alice A.
Walton, Carolyn
Warren, Gloria J.
Werner, Jeffrey A.
Westin, David L.
Whan, Barbara J.
Wilkinson, Thomas G.
Woodhouse, John J.
Zwanger, Lynn B.

Lamb, Lynn
Lim, Katherine
Miller, Michael
Nolan, Ann
Williams, Diane

f

;
!f
I4
r
k
I f
l
t±f

THIS
8:30

FRI.-SAT
BESSIE JONES
& the
Georgia Sea
Island Singers

WEEKEND
$2.50

:1

_l

III ;

III

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