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January 08, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-08

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Tuesday, January 8, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Tu'aJnar ,17 H MI'CH11muIAuNumulsiun1111uiuu11 DILY Page Three 1

Supreme Court will
hear case on legal
rights of the poor

CAPITAL ATTACKED
Cambodian forces clash

WASHINGTON () - The Su-
preme Court agreed yesterday to
decide whether indigent defen-
dants are entitled to a free law-
yer when they appeal state con-
victions to the highest state and
federal courts.
The justices agreed to review
a decision by the U. S. Circuit
Court at Richmond, Va., which
called on the states to provide
such counsel.
IN OTHER actions, the court:
-Agreed to review the de-
cision by a three judge federal
panel that gave journalists great-
er access to California prisons
for inmate interviews.
-Refused to hear a challenge
to Phase 4 price controls on re-
tail gasoline outlets.
NORTH CAROLINA appealed a
decision requiring that lawyers
be furnished to the Indigent de-
fendants for their appeals. Atty.
Gen. Robert Morgan asked the
justices to reverse the appeals
court.
The circuit judges had de-
clared that as long as the state
"allows other convicted felons
to seek access to the higher court
with help of retained counsel,
there is a marked absence of
fairness in denying an indigent
the assistance of counsel as he
seeks access to thersametcourt."
The appeals court noted that
the Supreme Court has upheld
the indigent's right to counsel
for initial appeals but has he-
served judgment on continuing
challenges.
"WHAT IS REQUISITE todayf
may not have been constitution- :
ally requisite 10 years ago or
even a few years ago. As our
legal resources grow, there is a
correlative growth in our ability
to implement basic notions of
fairness," wrote Judge Clement
Haynsworth, chief judge of the
circuit court.
State officials from California
brought the inmate - interview
issue to the justices. The three-
judge court overturned a state
regulation that permitted report-
ers interviews with randomly se-
lected inmates but did not allow
inmates to solicit interviews, nor
did it permit journalists to re-
quest access to specific inmates.
The lower court found that the
regulation denied prisoners their
constitutional right to free
speech.
THE STATE instituted the reg-
ulation after violence followed
notoriety given some inmates
through a more liberal inter-
view policy.
The specific case at issue arose
when a San Quentin inmate,
Booker Hillery, filed a complaint
after officials rejected an inter-
view with Earth Magazine. Oth-
THE MICHIGAN PA lVY
Volume LXXXV, Number 81
Tuesday, January 8, 1974 {
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Sunimer session publishe Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail 'other
states and foreign).

er prisoners and several jour-
nalists later joined the complaint.
The court, without comment,
refused to entertain an attack on
Phase 4 gasoline regulation. The
criticism branded the price con-
trols arbitrary and capricious.
STATION OPERATORS suing
for themselves and all other
covered by the regulations sought
access to federal court without
having to present an adminis-
trative appeal to the same of-
ficials who wrote the rules.
The temporary emergency
court of appeals set up to han-
dle price control litigation said
the operators should first ex-
haust administrative remedies,
The higher court refused to in-
terfere with that decision.
The litigation began last Au-
gust prior to the present petro-
leum shortage. An attorney for
the station operators said the
shortage in some cases has tight-
ened the economic squeeze on op-
erators despite higher prices at
the pump because less gasoline
is being sold at pre-shortage pro-
fit margins.

AP Photo

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (P)
--More than 3,000 government
reinforcements backed by ar-
mored vehicles sped to Phnom
Penh's northwest defense lines
yesterday to counter a big rebel
force slashing toward the capi-
tal, field reports said.
National police sources said
the insurgent thrust, north of
Pochentong Airport and five to
seven miles northwest of the city
itself, was a major effort to
pierce the capital's defense peri-
meter. But there was no imme-
diate sign it was an over-all as-
sault on the city.
FIELD REPORTS said insur-
gent attackers abducted an esti-
mated 4,000 villagers but that
many civilians remained in the
battle zone. The rebels were re-
ported holding civilian captives
near Tang Krasang pagoda five
miles from downtown Phnom
Penh.
Col. Phen Uon, commander of
the government's 28th Brigade,
told newsmen the Khmer Rouge
forces shot about 50 villagers. He
estimated another 200 of about
2,000 civilians trapped by the
fighting were killed in crossfire
and government artillery bar-
rages.
Field reports said hundreds of
refugee families were pouring
out of the battle area. Every
family told of missing or killed
relatives, they added.
THREE SPEARHEADS of a
total 75 armored personnel car-
riers attacked the rebel pocket
along atbroad seven-mile front
in open rice fields, the field re-
ports said.
Military sources claimed the
government armor and infantry
killed more than 100 Communist-
led Khmer Rouge rebels in four
counterthrusts that included mas-
sive cannonades by government
artillery.
Fleeing villages told reporters
they say "many, many dead

Red Khmers" being carried to
the rear in oxcarts or on two-man
slings.
UNITED STATES sources es-
timated that 3,000 rebels in a
quick maneuver over the last
two days have pushed into the
capital's northwest defense zone.
The insurgents had penetrated
to within a mile of Pochentong
Airport. But government armor-
ed units attacking across a broad
front pushed them back, captur-
ing almost 600 weapons, field re-
ports said. The government re-
inforcement was uncharacteris-

FIFTHl FIJNiL
210 S. FIFTH AVE.
ANN ARBOR
761-9700

eim's did it too)
Robert (Bobby) Baker arrives at U.S. District Court yesterday
where his lawyers proposed an as yet undisclosed settlement in
return for the dropping of federal action to recover $100,000 from
him. The government is attempting to get back money it claims
Baker took for influence-peddling while secretary to the Senate's
Democratic majority.

tically rapid and the movement
may have caught the insurgents
off balance.
Field reports said the insur-
gents late Saturday and Sunday
nights simultaneously attacked
63 villages in a bulge stretching
southwest of northeast.
THE FIGHTING runs along a
bowl-shaped line from seven
miles northwest of Phnom Penh
to seven miles west of the capi-
tal.

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OUTLOOK OPTIMISTIC:
Geneva peace talks resume;
Suez front termed unstable'

A'TIMOTHY BOOM~.S " LNDSAY WAGNER." JOHN HC LJSEMAN .flHE PAPR AE.
ST PICTURE o &.edROE.T C. THOMPSON - RODRICK PAUL m,.. t,JAMES BRIDGES
.rst,va F,3' m , ro b JAMES BIDGES aJOHN JAY OSBORN, JR. w yJH WILLIAMS
SHOWTiMES
evenings /
6:00-8:00-10:00

GENEVA 03) - Egyptian and
Israeli officers had a new round
of troop withdrawal talks yes-
terday marked by a midsession
break for consultations with
home.
Press reports preceding the
discussions had said the Israelis
were prepared to enter into de-
tailed talks on proposals for a
pullback 18 miles from the Suez
Canal based on Defense Minis-
ter Moshe Dayan's talks in
Washington last week.
BUT ISRAELI officials in Tel
Aviv discounted those reports,
saying the Israeli envoys had no
new instructions and were still
unprepared to go into detail.
Neither delegation in Geneva
broke the strict secrecy that has
marked the two weeks of off and
on negotiations.
United Nations sources said
the four broke up about midway
through their five hours of talks
for consultations with their re-
spective governments.
Israeli officials stressed that
the Geneva talks were still in the
preliminary stage pending reac-
tion from Cairo on the Israeli
troop disengagementtproposals
agreed on by Dyan and Secre-
tary of State Henry Kissinger
during the Israeli leader's stay
in Washington.
THE GOVERNMENT radio
said the Geneva talks were in
any case mostly a sideshow.
"The real drama is being play-
ed out in Washington, Moscow,
Cairo and Jerusalem," it added.
Israeli commentators agreed
that the government of Premier
Golda Meir - who was confined
to bed with the flu - is offer-
ing a sizable Suez withdrawal.
But they said Israel also was
demanding that Egypt thin out its
forces east of the canal and re-
open the waterway to traffic.

ISRAELI FOREIGN Minister
Abba Eban said in an interview
with the New York Post that for
the first time the Meir govern-
ment will have to make "con-
crete, arithmetical decisions
about borders" with Egypt, Sy-
ria and Jordan.
These basic decisions will
have to come as soon as Israel
reaches agreement with Egypt on
withdrawal along the tense Suez
front, he added.
Meanwhile, in Cairo yesterday
the United Nations Emergency
Force reported it had negotiat-
ed an Egyptian withdrawal from
a 220-yard advance near Ada-
biya on the western shore of the
Gulf of Suez.
U. N. SPOKESMAN Rudolf

Stajduhar said the Egyptians
had made the advance Saturday
night, and withdrew later in the
evening after the local Egyptian
commander was contacted by a
U.N. commander.
In a report to New York, the
U. N. force described the Egyp-
tian and Israeli positions as "un-
stable."
Similar efforts by the U. N.
force to get Egyptian units on
the east bank of the Suez Canal
near Qantara to pull back after
an advance Jan. 1 were unsuc-
cessful.
STAJDUHAR SAID there were
17 violations of the cease-fire on
Saturday - eight by Egypt, two
by Israel, two unidentified and
the rest exchanges of fire.

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