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January 08, 1974 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-08

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rOge Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, January 8, 1974

Page Two THE MICHiGAN UAILY

Hospital reform

(Continued from Page 1){
to implement the planning and
financing of new facilities, partic-i
ularly a new main hospital.
The present administrative struc-1
ture of the med center includes a
director, a board in control, and an
administrative staff. This body{
"primarily focused on problems'
relating to patient care and the1
interface among the Hospital, med
school, and nursing school."
THE REVIEW committee's pro-]
posals would abolish this present1
system and would create the po-
sition of Vice-President for Health
Affairs who would be assisted by a
council and the centralization of
the nursing, pharmacy, dentistry,
public health and medical schools
into the new school of Allied
Health Professions.
T h e committee recommended{
that the vice-president be charged
with long-term program and capi-
tal planning, development of ap-
propriate interdisciplinary and in-
terprofessional health education
AP Photo programs and representing the
University in health matters to
light sav-

external constituencies."
One member of the review com-
mittee, however, wrote a dissent-
ing report.
ROBERT DOERR, Associate
Dean of the Dental School believes
that "there is no evidence that the
establishment of a vice-president
for health affairs is the best solu-
tion" to med center problems.

urged
"I share their concern," con-
tinued Doerr. "Experience in
many other uniersities demon-
strates that medicine, in fact, does
dominate to the detriment of the
other he-lth schools - why run
that risk when the systems at
this University has been basically
successful?"

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Although Doerr agrees with most DOERR ALSO believed that the
of the committees observations, he centralization of the health sci-
believes that a vice-president for ences would lead to their isolation
health affairs "would detract from from the rest of the University.
the autonomy and could conceiv- This concern was also voiced by
ably lead to a weakening of the Nursing School Dean Carolyn
smaller h e a l t h professional Davis.
schools." "I'm highly skeptical of the
Doerr pointed out that four of committee's proposals because
the five deans of the health! they could cause the health sci-
schools were opposed to the com- ences to become isolated," she ex-
mittees proposals. plained.
DEAN JOHN GRONVALL of "I believe the creation of a new
the medical school, who is also the vice-presidency would promote un-
present director of the med cen- healthy division and competition
ter, was the only dean not opposed within the University. Modifica-
to the recommendations. tions of the present structure can
Doerr stated that the main con- solve some of the problems and
cern of the other deans was that preserve the strength of the indi-
medical - hospital problems would vidual health science schools," Do-
dominate the situation. err concluded.

Pre-dawn busing
School children in Peoria. Ill., await their school bus in the early morning darkness yesterday as one result of nationwide day

ings time, a measure hoped to conserve energy.
OPEN HOUSE at
HILLEL
We all have been busy doing our own thing, drink-
ing, sleeping, skiing, surfing, touring Israel.
JOIN US TONIGHT FOR SOME GOOD TALK AND
EATS WITH PEOPLE WHO HAVE RETURNED
FROM ISRAEL.
8:00 P.M.-1429 HILL ST.
*-- -
FACTS ON ABORTION
YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT:
! Abortions are legal in Michigan and easily available for early
pregnancies
" Early abortions need not cost more than $150, for total care
r Some clinics are better than others
t U of M counseling and medical staff have approved
KEEMER CLINIC.............1-961-9779'
SUMMIT MEDICAL CENTER ... 1-272-8450
WOMEN'S HEALTH SERVICE .. 1-272-2100
* All the above clinics perform free pregnancy testing and pro-
vide counseling services
r Late abortions (over 12 weeks from the last menstrual period)
must be performed in a hospital
For more information or pregnancy counseling, call the above
clinics or:
EAST CLINIC, Health Service Afternoons 3-5, Mon.-Frl.
207 Fletcher 763-1210
STUDENT SERVICES, Counseling Services 9-5, Mon.-Fri.
3rd Floor, Mich. Union 764-8437
ETHICS AND RELIGION 9-5, Mon.-Fri.
3rd Floor, Mich. Union 764-7442
MENTAL HEALTH CLINIC 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
2nd Floor, Health Service 764-8313
WOMEN'S CRISIS CENTER 2 p.m.-1 a.m.
306 N. Division (St. Andrews Church) 761-WISE

DAILY OFFICIAL BU L LETIN
Tuesday, January 8 to new faculty & faculty who needi

'

standards defended

DAY CALENDAR
Ctr. for Continuing Educ. of Women:
Lunchtime conversations, W omen's
Studies, Conf. Rms. 4, 5, League, noon.
Engineering: Bi-weekly meeting of
College Standing Comm., Dean's Office,
3 pm.
Modern Dance Class: Trotter House,
7 pm.
Music School: J. Dawson, saxaphone
'doctoral, SM Recital Hall, 8 pm.
Residential College Astronomical
5Film Festival: "The Violent Universe,"
E. Quad Aud., 9 pm.
GENERAL NOTICES
During Winter Aerm Mich. Memorial-
Phoenix Proj. will make grants to sup-
port research in peaceful uses of nu-
clear energy; requests for $3,000 or less
considered appropriate; priority given

help opening new area of research; re-
turn applications for grants to Phoe-
nix Pro. by Feb. 1; obtain applics. at
PML, N. Campus or call 764-6213,
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB, 763-4117
Interviews: Register by phone or in
person. Lakeside Farm Camp, MI,
Coed., will interview Jan. 15, 10 to 5.
Openings: specialists in waterfront, rid-'
ing, handcrafts, nature, gen. coun-
selors.
Camp Wise, Social Work Camp, OH.,
will interview Jan. 15, 9 to 5. Openings:
gen. counselors, specialists in all fields,
unit supervisors.
Camp Sea Gull. MI. Coed, will inter-
view Jan. 16, 9 to 5. Openings: water-
front, cabin counselors, specialists in
arts, crafts, riding, archery, tennis,
1gymnastics.
4Camp Tamarack MI Coed, will inter-
view Jan. 18, 9 to 5 & Jan. 25, 9 to 5.
Openings: gen. counselors, specialists in
every field, admin. openings, service

(Continued from Page 1) sions office is taking a more per- that general gradepoints were go-
-A rise in the cost of attending sonal course with applicants, send- ing up, and that students who
the University for out of state stu- ing follow-up letters and encour- might have flirted with probation
dents to the point where it is no aging more campus visits. He also in the past were now able to get a
longer competitive with other elite said that communication with couple of good grades and lift
institutions, cutting the number of state high schools was being their gradepoints to the point where
"superior out of state students" stepped up, so that high school they could evade trouble, while
attending the University, counselors would have a better those with chronic problems were
-A general decline in SAT scores idea of what a student needed for staying where they were. In other
nationally in the last ten years. The admission. words, some marginal students
average c o m b i n e d score has The University is also participat- were pulling away from the 2.0
dronped from 980 to 925 during ing in regional college fairs where area while others remained there.
that period, and prospective applicants can come The ones who are pulling away
-A decline in the number of and talk with representatives of are the ones who would have been
applicants due to the end of the the University. The University re- reinstated in the past. Now, fewer
postwar baby boom, and the fact cently took part in one held in of those asked not to return were
that fewer students desire to go Chicago, and plans are underway returning, and those who accounted
to college. for attending Philadelphia and for the higher reinstatement rate
The general economic and social Boston fairs. were no longer subject to academic
trends which have decreased the Associate Dean Charles Morris' disciplinary action.
relitive imnortance of a liberal report examined the number and Morris also disclosed that the
arts education in the last few nature of academic actions taken number of students who petition
years. in the last twelve years by the the Academic Action board has
Community colleges have grown University. risen dramatically in 'the last sev-
to the point where Sjorgren said Statistics over a twelve year' eral years, and that more students
that one half of all students start- period showed that fewer students were making use of incompletes
ing college in Michigan were start- were being placed on probation, than in the past. He said that this
ing at community colleges, par- and fewer were being asked not to accounted for the higher volume
ticularly in the northern part of continue than in the past. At the of traffic that that office dealt
the state. same time, of those asked not to with.
Sjorgren said that his office was continue, fewer were being rein-
taking steus to deal with the small- stated.
er pool of applicants. The admis- Morris explained this by saying
COuncii gives initial of assault

t
t
t
i
t

ORTH'OGONALITY
340 Maynard St.
GIGANTIC
SALE
on almost
everything
COME IN
AND SEE.

I

staafff..
I-

I1

PROJ ECT

OUTREACH

Psychology 201-2 credit hours
What? MASS MEETING
When? TONIGHT, Jan. 8
Time? 7:30 P.M.
Where? HILL AUDITORIUM

PROFESSIONAL
THEATRE
PROGRAM
Presents
VIVIAN
BLAINE
in
S.r
- I
a new comedy by
GEORGE FURTH
Saturday and Sunday
JANUARY 12-13
3:00 and 8:00
POWER CENTER
Advance Sales:
Mendelssohn Lobbby
764-0450
Power Center box office open
January 12-13 at 1:00 P.M.
763-3333

approval 1
reform ora
(Continued from Page 1) }
cluding removal from candidacy,j
or office if the election has already'
taken place, being ineligible forl
any city-wide office for the next
five years, and a $100 fine.
Although the idea of an election
control ordinance was generally
well received by the council mem-
bers, approval for the ordinance
came not without some previous
MEDITATION
arica and
tibetan
methods
Psychologist studying effects
of meditation offers training
in return for participaoon in
researchl.
SEEKING NEXPERIENCED AND
EXPERIENCED WOMEN
CAiL Tom Greenfild: 764-8437
Leave name and number

o election

(Continued from Page 1)
0 was Gill himself, who was per-
in a n C L intto read his account of the
SGC Administrative Vice Presi-
politicking by the sharply divided dent David Fowler and former Ex-
council. ecutive Vice President Sandy
Green supported Gill's contention
CAROL JONES (D-Second Ward) that Schaper, who is no longer a
cited what was commonly agreed student at the University, was sim-
by Democrats and Human Rights ply "walked down the hall" and
Party council members to be a expelled from SGC's chambers aft-
serious omission in the ordinance. er admittely leaving an SGC mim-
It did not contain any upper limit eograph machine in messy condi-
on the total amount that can be tion.
spent in an election campaign. The SGC president, who has been
DeGrieck explained the reason- a frequent target of charges rang-
ing behind the objection. He main-j ing from election fraud to em-
tained that the amount spent on bezzlement in recent months, was
publicity for an election campaign still glowing with jubilation last
can seriously effect the outcome night over his successful day in
of the election, and that, "the only court.
way to prevent an election from "I WAS BRILLIANT," laughed
being bought and keep it fair is Gill. "I made the prosecutor look
to have an upper limit on spending. like a fool. What it all boiled down
Any election control . law that to was the definition of assault and
doesn't have such a provisi n is a battery, and what happened be-
sham." tween Schaper and me plainly
doesn't fit that definition. That's
F+, why the jury came out so fast."
1+!Gill said his own attorney, Ger-
ald Smith of New York, could not
appear last week due to a case
of laryngitis and advised Gill to
HOUSE OF IMPORTS handle his own defense.
SHEEPSKIN COATS Gill, who once spent eight months
'/3 FF n te LAGES ofa two-year sentence in jail for
SOFF on the LARGEST driving a stolen vehi"t° across in-
SELECTION of the warm- terstate lines, has since been fully
est coants in Ann Arbor! paroled. A conviction on the as-
M XI: sault charge would have brought
MAX.:him a maximum penalty of 90
Reg. $185 ; days in jail or a $100 fine.
NOW $115 SCHAPER, whom Gill fired
*w$from his Council duties last May,
Swaked swiftly from the courtroom
% CAfollowing Thursday's trial and has
Re . $149 95 since been unavailable for com-
Rg $ment.
NOW $95 Thompson also would not com-
ment on Gill's acquittal.
JACKFTL

charges

"Experimental learning" in
institutional settings

28

Adult Activity Center
Child Care Action Center

Corntree Cooperative
Daycare Center
Drop-In Center for
Retarded Adults
Inkster Frazier
Elementary School
King School Tutorial
Maxey Boys Training
School
Mott-University
Childrens Hospital

'4..

T-Groups
Washtenaw County
Juvenile Court
Wayne County Clinic
for Child Study
Wayne County Child
Development Center
Yorkwoods
Ypsilanti State Hospital
Political Perspectives
on Prisons
Community Center
Proiect
Community Arts
Workshop
Senior Citizens Project
Educational Management Center
Peace Neighborhood Center
/'1'i _.... ... rs2w- w.:et.

Reg. $124.95
NOW $85
SAVE $$$
KEEP WARM!
Open 6 Days a Week
769-8555
320 E. LIBERTY, ANN ARBOR

HOPE YOU HAD
A NICE HOLIDAY
UM BARBERS
and STYLISTS
MICHIGAN UNION

Northville State Hospital

Plymouth Center for
Human Development
Pro Fect Transition
a . .- . .. -L

The Paulists
are trying
to meet the
challenge
of today's world
in city streets
and suburban homes
nn the campursn

in their own way
to achieve their mission:
to help Christ
communicate
the ideas
from His mind
to the minds
of all men
For more information about the
Paulists, America's first religious
community, send for the PAULIST

MINI-COURSE 310
CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN ETHICS
Crisis within traditional Christian ethics: historical background;
the relationship of faith and ethics; place of the Bible and tra-
dition. Contemporary debate: consequence versus norm; impor-

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