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March 14, 1974 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-03-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, March 14, 1974

THE- MICHIGAN- --DAILY --Thursday,- -March -14, -19-74

TTX,. I . r Ir"r

i

mes reporter Hunter speaks

(Continued from Page 1)
"The biggest blow that he felt
was the loss of his own seat in
Grand Rapids. He felt a sense of
disbelief that night," Hunter said.
Hunter feels that Ford expects
to be inhabiting the White House
soon. She cited Ford's contacts
with Congress as helping him to
sense Nixon's f a11in g standing
throughout the nation. "He's pretty
good at feeling the political pulse,"
she added.
Hunter characterized the Vice
President as "not terribly original

but a hard worker." In an earlier
interview she termed Ford's in-
telligence as "sort of average."
ACCORDING to Hunter, Ford is
"very e a r n e s t and seemingly
honest." "He gets along very well
with the press," she added.
Hunter was born in West Vir-
ginia but grew up in North Caro-
lina where she attended Elon Col-
lege. After her 1942 graduation she
joined the Raleigh News and Ob-
server. Since all the men were
being drafted, the paper had an all
women city desk.

i

Case dropped against
Ebriebman, ' plumbers'

She covered a wide variety of
stories including the North Caro-
lina state legislature. In 1949 she
moved to the now defunct Houston
Press.
She then became the Winston-Sa-
lem Journal's women's editor "only
to get back to North Carolina," be-
fore becoming a political reporter
again.
.Describing her start with the
Times 13 years ago she said, "I
was hired as the bureau female.
I covered H.E.W. and thalidomide
babies by day and Jackie Kennedy
by night." By the time of the John-
son administration, however, she
was reporting on Congress.
She, admitted, "There has been
prejudice at the Times, there's no
doubt about it." But she added,
"I'm not a gung-ho women's liber-
ationist probably because I never
did feel prejudice against me.';
A Women's Caucus was formed
recently at the Times to help bring
women's salaries into line with
those of their male counterparts
and to demand the promotion of
additional women to positions of
greater responsibility in the Times
hierarchy.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

Arab minist
end U.S. oil
(Continued from Page 1)
Office, said that drawing on in-
ventories to spur economic growth
would be a first priority once the
embargo is lifted.
But that judgment, when the
time comes, must consider the
rest of what the Arabs do.
Unless Arab production were in-
creased to pre-embargo levels and
perhaps higher, petroleum supplies
in the United States would remain
tight and allow no flexibility for
economic growth. That might well
require continued fuel-conservation
efforts.
Last October, the United States
imported about 35 per cent of its
oil, and roughly 12 per cent of the
total supply came from the Middle
East.
Federal energy officials said both
of those fractions must increase
rapidly if U.S. oil consumption in-
creases, because the Middle East
is the only place large increases
in oil imports can be obtained.
FEDERAL OFFICIALS m u s t
also weigh the possibility that
Arab-Israeli warfare could, sooner
or later, break out anew and touch
off another embargo. I
They already acknowledge it
would be wise to restrain the
growth of oil demand to prevent

ers said to NEW WORLD MEDIA INTERNATIONAL SERIES
PRESENTS:
embargo CNMANVIBAI
U.S. dependence on Arab oil from
getting much larger before the i
United States can develop new
energy resources of its own.I*
Even if the Arabs provide all the,
oil the United States wants, the * Y.r
international oil price would re-
main a problem. The more foreign Am b
oil the United States imports, the=-Y*
greater the problem would become *GLA.UBER
as payments for that oil drain dol- G
lars from the domestic economy. *R N
Last September, the typical post- ROC A
ed price of Arab oil was $3.01 per
barrel; now it is $11.65.
The prices are not likely to re- * East Quad Auditorium tonite Small Donation
turn to their old levels. So yester- .** ****
day's leaked word of an early endFQ
to the embargo offers hope for Friday OB EAST QBAn Auditorium
some easing of U.S. energy prob- PUERTO RICO Culebra: The *
lems, but not yet the promise ofRC l*
a complete or permanent solution * 8 P.M.-FREE Pais Colonizado
to them. F F i * K i F F F i X K Kiy ayy

(Continued from Page 1)
Rodino defended his committee
against White House charges that
it is conducting a "fishing expedi-
tion" and stated he was ready to
issue subpoenas if necessary to ob-
tain the requested evidence.
President Nixon and his attorney
James St. Clair have contended
that the committee's impeachment
probe should be limited to Water-
gate and the related cover-up.
The committee is seeking evi-
dence involving a wide range of
alleged presidential misconduct in-
cluding Nixon's questionable in-
come tax returns, the secret bomb-
ings of Cambodia, and the ITT and

Milk Fund scandals.
Rodino was supported in his hard
line against the President by the
committee's r a n k i n g minority
member, Rep. Edward Hutchinson
(R-Mich.). Hutchinson has been
noted for his especially conciliatory
attitude toward the White House in
the past.
Yesterday, however, appearing
at a joint press conference with
Rodino, Hutchinson defended the
broad scope of the committee in-
vestigation claiming that "the re-
quests made to date are very rea-
sonable." He said the White House
"should be t o t a 11 y cooperative
with us."

r

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