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March 14, 1974 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-03-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY irtursdayNlarcfl vt, w'ii't

OR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I rursday, March 14, 19 !4 -1

El

mediatrics presents

"AN OFFERING

YOU CAN'T

REFUSE"

THE CENTER FOR RUSSIAN AND EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES
is sponsoring mini-course 420
NON-RUSSIAN NATIONALITIES OF THE U.S.S.R.
First in a Series of Lectures
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20
Vernon Aspaturian, Research Professor of Political Science and Di-
rector of the Slavic and Area Studies Center, Pennsylvania State Uni-
versity. "Soviet Nationalities and Nationality Policy: Implications for
the Nature and Future of the U.S.S.R."
4:00 P.M.-LECTURE ROOM 1, MODERN LANGUAGE BUILDING
See March 15 Michigan Daily for a complete schedule of lectures.
Undergraduates who wish to earn (1) credit pass/fail should plan to
attend three discussion meetings as well as lectures. Add slips should
be obtained from the counseling office and be brought to the Center
for Russian and East European Studies, 220 Lane Hall. If you have
any questions please call the Center, 764-0351.
SPECIAL RING DAYS
MARCH 14, 15
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Order Your College Ring During These Days
and Have Your Signature Etched in GOLD
-FREE
RING DAY SPECIAL
Company representative"will assist you Delivery guaranteed
before end of spring term.
Follett's Book Store
322 SOUTH STATE STREET

TITLE UP FOR GRABS
NCAA regionals

begin

By RAY O'HARA
While the unanticipated presence
of Michigan in 'the Mid-East Re-
gional threatens disaster for that
tourney's other participants this
week, the NCAA has been quietly
pursuing the grim task of selecting
final-round contestants in three
other unheralded regional tourna-
men.
Facing the Mid-East Regional
1 survivor in the semi-final round of
the' NCAA, tournament in Greens-
boro, N.C., on March 23 will be
the winner of the Mid-Western Re-
gional. Four contenders - Creigh-
ton, Oral Roberts, Kansas and
Louisville-will vie for the honor
this weekend on the Oral Roberts
campus in Tulsa. Kansas meets
Creighton and Oral Roberts hosts
Louisville.
Many observers feel that the
' Mid-West is the weakest of the
four regional play-off s since
none of the participating teams
are highly ranked nationally. Not
so, contends Louisville coach
Denny Crum, who explains that,
"Most of the publicity is center-
ed on the East and West coasts,
so naturally those teams get

Thur.-Sat., March 14-16 at 7:00 and 9:30 p.m.
MATINEE - Sun., March 17 at 2:30 p.m.
Natural Science Auditorium

more recognition and the polls
rate them higher."
Mid-West watchers expect a run-
ning match to develop between
Louisville and Oral Roberts, two
short-but-quick squads. The Kan-
sas-Creighton clash, pitting two:
higher-rated teams against one an-
other, should be more placid. Win-
ners of these preliminaries will;
collide on Saturday afternoon.
Providence College has the du-
bious distinction of being the first
team to challenge North Carolina
State in the Wolfpack's den in
Raleigh, N.C.
Despite the presence on his team1
of All-Americans Marvin Barnes
and ° Kevin Stacom, Providence
coach Dave Gavitt admits that his
Friars will have to play "near-
perfect basketball" to skin the
Wolf pack.
High-powered N.C. State, led
by two-timerAll-American fr-
ward David Thompson, will be
supported from tip-off to buzzer
by thousands of screaming Caro-
lina partisans who are itching itr
a rematch with UCLA, the cnly
team to defeat the Wolfpack this
season.
In the other Eastern regional
b r a c k e t, surprising Pittsburgh
takes on even more surprising
Furman in a game which only a
foolish few anticipated. Furman,
RAY BRADBURY'S
ILLUSTRATED
MAN,
From the Master of sci-fi
Friday and Saturday
Shows at Band 10 p.m.
ADMISSION ONLY 75c
Couzens Cafeteria
A Couzens Film Co-op
Presentation

.ot off :i amazing string of up-
sets. will give the ball to Clyde
M s, wh led FIrman's come-
fron-ehind shocker over highly
reg rdel South Carolina.
Pitt roach Buzz Ridl will look
to Bill "Moony" Knight to c)ntri-
bute heavily to the Panthers' at-
tempt to win their 25th game and
a ticket to the Eastern finals on
Saturday.
Out West, per en n ia1 kill-joy
UCLA will probably be up to its
old tricks in Tucson this weekend
with Dayton first on the Bruin
menu. UCLA mentor John Wooden
is a ny th i ng but overconfident,
though.
"Any team that makes it to
the regionals has a chance to
beat any other team," the canny
Purdue graduate claims. Wooden
added, "Dayton is capable of
beating anyone, including us."
Notre Dame found out what hap-
pens to teams who underestimate
Dayton when the Flyers knocked
off the Irish by 17 points recently.
Nevertheless, Wooden had a word
for the wise: "I think we're in
better condition now than at any
time since Walton got hurt (Jan
7). He is completely recovered
now."
New Mexico and San Francisco
collide in the other Western Re-
gional game. The sharp-shooting
New Mexico Lobos found them-
selves on top of the WAC with a
21-6 record after the regular sea-
son and expect trouble against an-
other Cinderella team. The Dons
won 11 of their last 12 outings, af-
ter starting the season with a gray
7-7 skein.
If Michigan makes it. past the
regionals, do any of these teams
have a chance of stopping the
Wolverine juggernaut? Realistical-
ly, yes, but it's interesting to note
that even John Wooden refuses to
predict victory for his Bruins,
should they clash with the Maize
and Blue.

ONLY $100

original works of graphic art-etchings, lithographs,-
by leading 20th century artists:
Pablo Picasso Johnny Friedlaender Marc Chagall
Salvador Dali, Alexander Calder Joan Miro
Georges Rouault Victor Vasarely and others.
First Show of New Year! All New Art!
THIS SUNDAY, MARCH 17th at 3:00 P.M.
MARRIOTT INN
U.S. 23 AT PLYMOUTH RD.

Exhibition: 1:00-3:00,
Presented by the MERIDIAN GALLERY

Moderate Prices
Free Admission

The University of Michigan
CENTER FOR SOUTH & SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES
ANNOUNCES

A SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST
MINI - COURSE

ASIAN

THE EVOLUTION OF A MYTH.
The Ramayana in SouthernAsia
(Division No. 495, Course No. 418) *
MARCH 19- APRIL 4
The purpose of this course will be to explore what
happens as a classic story travels from region to re-
gion and from medium to medium. How do symbolic
forms evolve? How does a story keep its relevance
thrugh history? How does medium shape content?
Scholars from several fields-art, music, literature,
philosophy, linguistics, and history-have been ask-
ed to dicuss the great Sanskrit clasic, the Rama-
yana, giving special attention to these questions.

Each class
Thursdays,

will run from 3:00-5:30, Tuesdays and
at 306 Burton Memorial Tower.

- PARTICIPATING FACULTY -
ALTON L. BECKER - Linguistics
MADHAV DESHPANDE - Linguistics
LUIS GOMEZ - Buddhist Studies
SATENDRA KHANNA - English
CHANDRA AGRAWAL - Humanities
WALTER SPINK - Art History
NAZIR JAIRAZBHOY - Indian Music,
Univ. of Windsor
WILLIAM GEDNEY - Linguistics
HIRAM WOODWARD- History of Art

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