100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 27, 1974 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

[ HE''1Vti . C'-N GAN DAI L ,'

Wednesday, February 27, 1974

Il-jE MCHIGAN CAlL': Wednesday, February 27, 1974

:es rise in January

Liberal tops British

poll;

VASMINGTON (M) - The an-
al retail cost of a grocery mar-
basket of food jumped to a
ord $1,680 spurred by an in-
ased farm prices, for major
d items during the month of
auary, the U. S. Department
Agriculture reported yester-
fficials said the January in-
ase in food costs was up an
aual rate of 1.8 per cent and
uld cost consumers an addi-
nal $305 a year for food.
)EPARTMENT OF Agricul-
e economists predict that food

prices will continue to rise
through mid-year and perhaps
even longer unless a record har-
vest lowers overall prices.
For all of 1974, USDA econo-
mists predict grocery store price
increases of as much as 16 per
cent above last years level.
The market basket, which in-
cludes only U. S. farm-produced
food, is theoretically enough to
feed a household of 3.2 people
for an entire year.
THE PRICE increase was led
by increases in the cost of beef,

Join The Daily Staff

Phone

7.64-0558

which rose 6.4 per cent in Janu-
ary over the average all-cut cost
in December.
Other calculations showed that
farmers received $769 as their
share of the retail basket cost
in January, up $47 or 6.6 per
cent from the annual rate in De-
cember. Compared with a year
earlier, farmers in January got
29.1 per cent more or $173.
Middlemen, whose margins for
processing and selling food had
been expanding for months, had
a reduced share in January of
$911, a decline of $17 or $1.8 per
cent from December.
But the figures showed middle-
man spreads were up $132 or 17
per cent from January 1973.
The figures were compiled by
USDA technicians at the request
of reporters.
SKI UTAH
COLORADO
Spring Break 3/1-3/10
with A3-AYH
$224.O
INCLUDES
All lifts for 7 days
All food for whole trip
All accommodations
All transportation
X-country equipment
supplied,. sauna, swim
Cook outs and many extra.
MEET:
WED. 2/27-8 P.M.
UNION ASSY. HALL
INFO: BRAD, 449-2668

A m I IA TP TI II' fM wr Afi CAmr 1I

election begins tomorrow

ADI

VKAIJUVI lL J I UULIII J VY LLIIL

AP Photo
BRITISH LIBERAL PARTY leader Jeremy Thorpe appears on
closed circuit television yesterday to address his party's press
conference at party headquarters in London. With only one full
day to go before British voters choose a new Parliament, the
London Daily Mail reports that middle-of-the-road Thorpe topped
their personal preference poll with a vote of 33 per cent.

mu m rur, r i

GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR

i MONE"

LONDON () - Jeremy Thorpe,
the leader of Britain's middle-
of-the-road Liberal party, emer-
ged yesterday as the man most
popular among the e untry's
three candidates for prime mm-
ister.
Until last year the joke was
that his minority party had so
few legislators compared ti the
major electoral contenders -- the
Labor and Conservative narties-
that he could take all five to Par-
liament in one London taxi.
A STRING of special ele,;tion
victories pushed the number to
11, but his party still trails far
behind the Big Two. A stana-
off, however, could leave the
Liberals in a crucial swing posi-
tion, able to trade their support
for policies they favor.
The lean-faced 43 year-old
Thorpe has boosted his party's
.chances by being named the par-
ty leader who has most impres-
sed the nation in the bitter ca-n-
paign.
With only one full day to go
before Britons vote Thursday, the
Daily, Mail newspaper reported
that Thorpe topped a personal
popularity poll with 33 per cent.
That was a six-point leap since
the last poll five days ago.
PRIME MINISTER Edward
Heath, silver-haired leader of
the incumbent Conservatives,
tumbled into second place with
25 per cent, down from 27 per
cent. Labor leader Harold XVil-
son stayed at 20 per cent, and
ABORTION ALTERNATIVE
OFFERED BY
Problem Pregnancy Help
24 hr. phone: 769-7283
Office: Basement-400 S.. Division
(corner of William)
Hrs. Mon.-Thurs. 1-4:30 p.m.
Thurs. evening 6-9 p.m.
FREE PREGNANCY TESTING

WEDNESDAY
8-10 p.m.
West Conference
Room, 4th Floor
RACKHAM

22 per cent of Britons ques-
tioned would not commit them-
selves.
Thorpe, an ex-lawyer and tele-
vision personality given to sport-
ing velvet-collared rairi.oats,
brushed aside the polls. Personal-
ity cult polls, he snorted, a r e
"a lot of old rubbish. I think
politics are more serious than
that."
His surge in popularity came as
a national opinion poll gave the
Liberals 22 per cent of the vote
- up from 16.9 in one of its sur-
veys five days ago. The party
only took seven per cent in the
1970 parliamentary election.
THE CONSERVATIVE percent-
age tumbled from 43.4 five days
ago to 40.4 and Labor's from 37.8
to 35.5, the poll reported.
Thi Liberals have rapidly gain-
ed on the two giant parties since
the campaign kicked off nearly
three weeks ago. Their reported
breakthrough could signal the end
of the once-great party's half-

century in the doldrums and the-
oretically win them as many as
60 seats in the 635-member House
of Commons.
The Liberals, who claim to
bridge the gap between big
business and labor unions, seek
to create a boss-worker partner-,
ship in factories to end crippling
industrial turmoil, to decentral-
ize government with regional as-
sembliestand to improve the,.wel-
fare state.
ALL PARTIES launched final
drives to capture the moderate
vote, regarded as th ekey to vic-
tory in the feud-scarred 'cam-
paign.
Although the Conservatives still
held their lead in the polls, com-
mentators noted that yesterday's
survey was conducted before the
government announced the na-
tion's biggest-ever monthly trade
deficit of $880.9 million in Jan-
uary.

M PIN

BOWLING

March 2-10
WIN A FREE GAME
Michigan Union

Michigan Union
OPEN
REGULAR HOURS
DURING BREAK

11

--

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Wednesday, February 17 "Weak Neutral Currents," P-A Bldg.
Coflog. Rm., 4 pm.
Day Calendar Ext. Service, English: poetry reading,
Commission for Women: Regents' P. Levine, Aud. 3, MLB, 4:10 pm.
Rm., noon. Gerontology: M. McGuire, Waiing-
Computing Ctr.: D. Atkins, "Present ton D.C., "Housing the Elderly:'Can
& Future Roles of Microprocessors," Social Policy Support Viable ,Life
120 P-A Bldg., noon. Styles," 2064 Frieze Bldg., 7 pm. ,
Ctr. Russian, E. European Studies: V. Ethics, Religion, UAC: "Sunseed,"
Dunham, WSU, "The Twin Roots of documentary of eastern religious teach-
Meshchanstro," Commons Rm., Lane ers, Mendelssohn Theatre, 7, 9:30 pm.
Hail, noon.t Music School: M. Ramos, guitarist,
Anatomy: W. Castor, "Connective Rackham Aud., 8 pm.
Tissue Activation," 4808 Med. Set. II, Career Planning and Placement
1:10 pm. 3200 SAB, 764-7460
Ctr. Russian, E. European Studies: B. - Psychology majors interested in treat-
Bociurkiw, Carleton U, "Church.State ment of disturbed children, full time
Relations in Eastern Europe: A Com- counselor positions as well as .a com-
parative Analysis," E. Conf. Rm., Rack- bined program of graduate study and
ham, 4 pm. assistantships a reopen at U of Chi-
Psych Film Series: "Chanegs: P. C. cago. Write: Director of Orthogenic
Friend;" "Railroad Agent;" "Babbitt;" School, 1365 E. 60th St., Chicago 60637.
"They Want to Make work Human Engineering seniors interested in
Again," Aud. 3, MLB, 4 pm. health-care delivery, apply to MS pro-
Industrial & Op. Engineering: M. gram with paid internship at *; hos-
Fisher, U of Chicago, "A Dual Algo- - pital in clinical engr., at Case Western
rithm for the One-Machine Scheduling Reserve U., Cleveland 44106.
Problem," 229 W. Engin., 4 pm. . $2700 fellowships for 1-yr. MA in mu-
Statistics: A. Liebetrau, "Estimation sic at Eastern Wash. State College,
of the Second-Order Properties of a. Cheney, Wash. 99004. Deadline March 1.
Stationary Point Process," 1007 Angell For recruiter appointments call 764-
Hall, 4 pm. 7456; appointments will not be made
Physics: A. Pals, Rockefeller U. at any other number.

Ii, -'IN

DIMENSIONS OF RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE
LECTURE AND DISCUSSION SERIES
SOUTH AMERICAN "Shamanistic, Yogic, Gnostic, Socio Economics"
(quote by Gory Snyder, Earth Household)
FEBRUARY 26 and 27, 1974
Johnny Earles, Tues., 7:30, Angell, Aud. D
INCA MIND AND-COSMOLOGY
Michael Horner, Wed. 3:00, Angell, Aud. A
.SHAMANISM AND HALLUCINOGENS (Jivaro: People of the
Sacred Waterfalls)
Mick Taussig, Wed. 7:30, Angell, Aud. D
SHAMANISM, RELIGION AND THE SPIRITUALITY OF
RURAL CAPITALISM (in Northwestern South America)
Concluding panel discussion with the participants following Wed. lecture
MARCH 13, WEDNESDAY 3-5 p.m.., ANGELL, AUD. A.
AQUA RIAN AGE CONSCIOUSNESS THROUGH THE
CELESTIAL ARTS: THE SPIRITUAL SIGNIFICANCE OF 1974
by RAYMOND MERRIMAN
Sponsored by Office of Ethics and Religion, 3rd floor. Michigan Union 764-7442

Join the movement, baby.
People on campuses are finding that our little jars of
Gerber baby food make great snacks.
And when you think about it, why shouldn't an adult
like them?
Our little jars of pudding are every bit as good as the
canned snack puddings you're probably eating now.
And they cost less.
Lots of good pudding flavors, too. Chocolate cus-
tard, vanilla custard and cherry vanilla.
And we make other tasty little items. Blueberry
buckle, Dutch apple dessert, peach cobbler and rasp-
berry cobbler.

Little jars of fruit, too. Bananas with pineapple,
applesauce.
What's more, Gerber baby foods need no refrigera-
tion until they're opened. So you can keep them right on
your desk. (Or hide them in a dresser drawer, if you're
sensitive.)
And you know, Gerber baby foods come in conve-
nient-size jars-enough for one serving.
To give you a good start on our good little snacks,
we're offering you 10$ off your first jar of Gerber baby
food.

TICE'S REMODELING
To celebrate this occasion we offer the following mer-
chandise at unbelievable discounts:
ALL CASUAL SPORT COATS
SLACKS (100% POLYESTER)
(PERMANENT PRESS)
VALUES
TO $65
20%/4OFF $24 TO$6
SHIRT BRING IN THIS AD AND GET A
SPECIAL FLANNEL SHIRT
$1.88 each FOR
or ' 0
3f$0 $388
3 for
r SOM mi r ri co nt o u e u ome nti one - S A L E N S S T U

Look over our 150 varieties and give
them a try. And more power to you.

a couple of

STORE COUPON
H 101c off on
your first jar of
Gerber baby food.
Notice to retailer: Gerber will redeem
this coupon at 10ยข, plus 30 handling,

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan