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February 26, 1974 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1974-02-26

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THE -MI-CHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

THE MICHIGAN DAILY 1'age Three

Hearst $4 million food

ransom
By AP and UPI
HILLSBOROUGH, Calif. - The
massive food giveaway program
aimed at obtaining the release
of kidnaped Patricia Hearst -is
being delayed for at least two
days because of supply prob-
lems, a spokesperson said yester-
day.
"Since high-quality food as out-
lined in the SLA demands cannot
be purchased by tomorrow," the
spokesperson said, "we will not
open on Tuesday."
Meantime, the Randolph Hearst
family continued its tense vigil
with no new word on the 20-
year-old girl's fate.
"THERE IS nothing for us to
do. It is frustrating, just wait-
ing," said family spokesman Jay
Bosworth, brother-in-law of Pa-
tricia Hearst who was taken
from her Berkeley apartment
three weeks ago.
Leaders of People in Need said
they were reorganizing the free
food distribution system because
of confusion, crowding and vio-
lence which marred the first dis-
tribution Friday at four centers.
The distribution was scheduled
to continue Tuesday, Thursday
and Saturday at a dozen loca-
tions.
'The response has been super,"
said PIN's acting director, Peg-

program
gy Maze. "People from all over
the country have been sending
bread, milk, frozen food, money
and love."
HEARST said the latest de-
mand was beyong his personal
means, but the Hearst Corp. of-
fered to provide the additional
money if his 20-year-old Univer-
sity of California daughter is re-
leased unharmed.
rCharles Bates, special agent in
charge of the FBI's San Francis-
co office, said the counteroffer
made Friday "throws the ball
back" to the kidnapers. But he
said no new word had been re-
ceived from the SLA. "There is
nothing new at all, no communi-
cation," he said.
"A great many mistakes were
made" in Friday's initial give-
away, said Ludlow Kramer, the
Washington secretary of state
who organized PIN at Hearst's
request.
DESPITE the problems, 14,000
people received free food, Kram-
er said. He added he hopes the
Hearst money plus donations
will lead to a program that will
feed 100,000 needy Californians
indefinitely.
Ms. Hearsts' voice was on three
tape recordings received from
the SLA, which described her as

delayed
a prisoner of war and threaten-
ed to kill her if any rescue at-
tempt is made.
The initial PIN funding includ-
ed $500,000 from Hearst person-
ally and $1.5 million from t h e
nonprofit Hearst Foundation.
HEARST is president and edi-
tor of the San Francisco Exam-
iner and chairman of the Hearst
Corp.
The SLA said that Hearst
should feed the needy as an act
of repentence because he is a
"corporate enemy of the peo-
ple" whose business dealings
have hurt innocent people.
An SLA message received on
Thursday threatened to cut off
communications unless Hearst
provided the additional $4 million
within 24 hours.
Bates was asked yesterday if
at some point he would consider
the SLAeto have cut communica-
tions. He said, "At some point,
yes. I just don't know w h e n
that point will be. I don't think
we are at the point as yet."

C TRAVEL
PRESENTS:
EUROPE SUMMER
FLIGHTS
0 all flights round-trip from Detroit to
Frankfurt, Germany
' May 1-May 23 .. $254.00*
May 22-June 20 . . $274.00*
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*prices expected to increase 6% due to
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NOTE: a long flight from mid-May to
Mid-August is currently being. negotiated
1nformat ion at UAC Travel
2nd floor Union-763-2147

AP Photo
Breakthrough for eye patients?
Dr. Eliot Bergson of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston helps a patient use a
recently developed electronic light amplifying device originally used by battlefield soldiers in
Vietnam. The instrument enhances vision in dimlight and many be beneficial to victims of a
blinding disease called Retinitis Pigmentosa. The light amplifier was developed for the military
by the International Telephone and Telegraph Corp. (ITT) for the Army Night Vision Laboratory
in Fort Belvoir, Va. The developers say a marketable device may be r e a d y in less than two
years. Dr. Steward Flaschen, technical director for ITT, said the device uses the principles of
television signal reception to boost faint light signals for the viewer to see on a specially coated
lens.
PANEL REQUESTS FUNDS:
President suppresses heart
research study, group sayvs

I

Financial Aid Applications
FOR
Spring-Summer Term
Applications are available at the Office of Financial
Aid (2011 S.A.B.). Students wishing to be consider-
ed for assistance or for full-time College Work-
Study Employment, should pick up these forms
now. The deadline date for submission of all com-
pleted application materials is March 1, 1974.

SILENT COMEDY CLASSICS
COMEDY SHORTS (at 6:30
A program of early comedy shorts-by Chaplin, Keaton, Lloyd,, and Langdon.
THE GOLD RUSH (at 8:30 and 10:15)
Chaplin's first, and, many think (including himself), finest feature comedy. The
tramp looks for his fortune in the rough human nature of the Yukon country.
ARCHITECTURE
cinema guild $1 each show AUDITORIUM

Editor's Note: This article was
compiled by the Chronicle of
Higher Education.
Frustrated scientists are press-
ing the Nixon Administration to
release a long-suppressed report
that recommends a substantial
increase in funds to support heart
research and education at each
of the nation's medical schools,
according to The Chronicle of
Higher Education.
The report, which was prepar-
ed by a special President's Ad-
visory Panel on Heart Disease in
1972, has been bottled up ever
since, apparently because of its
liberal spending recommenda-
tions run counter to the Admin-
istration's desire to keep federal
spending in check.
A COPY of the report was ob-
tained recently by The Chronicle,
a higher education weekly news-
paper. The report contains doz-
ens of recommendations for a co-
ordinated attack on heart dis-
ease through research, educa-
tion, communication and delivery
of health services.
Two of its major recommenda-
tions call for the federal govern-
ment to spend $10 million a year
to support a "cardiovascular re-
search professorship" in every
medical school in the country,
and another $10 million a year to
support 50 additional "profes-
sorial groups," each consisting of
several competent cardiovascular
investigators. The report also re-
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 123
Tuesday,'February 26, 1974
is edited and managed by students at,
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0582. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during' the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other stater
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area): $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio), $7.00 non-local mail other
states and foreign)..1
g1

commends support for teaching
and training at medical schools,
The Chronicle says.
A prime goal of the recom-
mendations is to introduce stable
funding to a bio-medical research
scene that has been troubled by
uncertainty in recent years as
federal programs were stopped
and started. The proposed grants
for research professorships
would be for ten years; the
grants for research groups, for
seven years.
THE REPORT was prepared
for President Nixon by a panel
of 20 experts headed by John
Millis, chancellor emeritus of
Case Western Reserve Univer-
sity.
The panel was appointed with
considerable flourish on April
4, 1972, and was asked "to deter-
mine why heart disease, is so
prevalent and so menacing and
what can be done about it."
It held its first meeting on
May 18, launched a crash effort
to meet an early Presidential
deadline, and submitted its final
report to the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare
(HEW) on Sept. 1, 1972. Six weeks
later the report was forwarded
to President Nixon.
It never emerged from t h e
White House.
NO OFFICIAL explanation has
ever been offered as to why the
report was not released. But
one HEW source told The Chron-
M PIN BOWLING
March 2-10
WIN A FREE GAME
Michigan Union

icle: "We weren't prepared to
accept the recommendations.
They threw in everything but the
kitchen sink. If you cost it out,
it would have eaten up the entire
budget to mount the enormous
program they recommended."
Whatever the reason, the sup-
pression has angered many scien-
tists who believe the recommend-
ations should be made public and
allowed to stand or fall on their
own merit.
One member of the Millis pan-
el - Julius Comroe, director of
the University of California's
Cardiovascular Research Insti-
tute in San Francisco wrote a let-
ter to Science Magazine, pub-
lished in the Jan. 18 issue,
complaining that Congress has
been deprived of a report that
might be useful in developing
federal health research budgets.

L

11!

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DAYSTAR CONCERTS
FUTURE WORLDS

MUSKET
SOPH SHOW

1I

COLLEGE JUNIOR
PROGRAM FOR GIRLS
Attend the college of your
choice. Receive over $500
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year. Apply during your
junior year.
Serve as an Army Officer
(only 2 years).
For details contact:
Lt. Carla L.B. Procopio
WAC Selection Officer
U.S. Army Recruiting-
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428 Clinton St.
Detroit, Michigan 48226
CALL: 964-3619 or 964-3748

I

Chief Financial Officer
Coordinating Vice President
Public Relations Vice President
and next year's
producer of Soph Show
Petitions may be picked up in the U.A.C. Offices,
2nd floor, Michigan Union,
and must be returned by Monday, March 11.
For further information, drop by the office or call 763-1 107

I

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1112 South University

.b d - The Chronicle of Higher Education
. unpyUb-.ls R.epr 1717 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W.
I --r. y -.t I Washington, D.C. 20036
Uedj13iwetht on2,teS n'O'I Please send me The Chronicle for one year (42 issues). Bill me
«ntof hettawn' ulI~epu 106free to diutpe 'A" to be ou
i t.-blater at theregularrateof $21.
intosaphoo witbml the ww t fthe t- fofthe
...tdmday[jI I prefer to see the next 12 issues at the introductory rate of $7.50.
oe::fufpBill me later.
.ahrdmcTs u eian hr*1

Sunday, 1-ebruary 2 I

1111

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