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February 24, 1974 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-24

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, February 24, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAiLY Sunday, February 24, 1974

Whiz kids go baroque Bellacourt

Bond. set for kidnappers

Be careful withi fire:
There are babes
in the woods.

(Continued from Page 1) Z they were exposed to various art
history course. ! forms.
Valery Ward, a parent of one of Students qualify as a gifted child
the children, praised Ingram's if they score above 95 per cent on
"outstanding sensitivity to chil- a test administered by the Gifted'
dren. She noted his ability to mold; Students Foundation of Dallas,
their comments into the lesson. Tex. Eligibility is additionally es-
tablished by an IQ of at least 125.
THE CLASS roughly corresponds "Their needs are simply not be-
to the University's History of Art ing met in the area public
101 (prehistoric to 17th century schools," contends Carol Packard,
art). But unlike 101, there are no past president of the Ann Arbor As-
exams nor outside work. However, sociation for Gifted Children (AA-
on their child's completion, par- GC) which sponsors the course.

1

speaks at
Fishibowl

(Continued from Page 1)
Atlanta area since 1969, Williams,
said. He added that he was a Navy
veteran who received a medical
discharge after three years serv-
ice.
Williams appeared nervous dur-
ing the arraignment, glancing oc-
casionally at reporters and smiling
weakly.
The three suitcases of monev

time before the exact amount re-
covered could.be determined.
"It's heavy - three suitcases
full," said a police officer as he
helped carry out the money. "One
man couldn't- carry it."
Murphy, at a news conference in
his home just 19 hours after his
release, said, "I'm mystified as to
whether the motive was political or

re. w .srrs. .t

I

WASHTENAW COMMUNITY COLLEGE
PRESENTS
SHORT TERM MECHANIC TRAINING PROGRAM
SECOND QUARTER
Test Equipment 064
Meets Tuesdays, Starting February 26, 1974, Six (6) Weeks, 7:00-10:00 p.m.
A basic class in test equipment covering meters and gauges used today for diagnosing automotive
engine problems. Items included will be voltmeters, ampmeters, ohmmeters, vacuum and pressure
gauges. Class will assume a basic understanding of the automobile engine and accessories.
Basic Tune Up 043
Meets Wednesdays, Starting February 27, 1974, Six (6) Weeks, 7:00-10:00 p.m.
Class will be involved with proper -installation of plugs, points and condensers and necessary
adjustments that go along with installation of these parts. The automobile worked on in the
class will be pre-1969 and this class will be prerequisite to the Advanced Tune Up class to be
offered later. Class assumes a basic knowledge of the automobile engine.
Saturday's Mechanic For Men and Women 059
Meets Saturdays, Starting March 2, 1974, Six (6) Weeks, 9:00-12:00 a.m.
An introduction to the basic principles of operation and service of today's automobiles (NOT TO
INCLUDE TUNE UP). Students will be able to perform service operations on their own vehicles.
For example: lubrication, safety inspection, general vehicle upkeep.
Interested persons must call the Auto- LOCATION: Washtenaw Community
motive Service Center at 434-1555 College
and pre-register on the appropriate Automotive Service Center
class list. Class size will be limited to 5115 Carpenter Road
14. You must be pre-registered to be Ypsilanti, MI.
in the class. eO r. o cnunnr

ents evaluate the teacher and his
presentation.
Ingram criticized the Univer-
sity's history of art program.
Claiming the 'U' relies too heavily
on the textbook, he warns, "if
one reads, one gets bogged down
in abstractions, not real objects."
Most of the youngsters have a
rich cultural background compar-
ed to the average child. Having
traveled extensively in Europe,
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 121
Saturday, February 23, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 49106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the 'University year at 420 May.
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carriercam.
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local wait (other stater,
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area)- $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail ;other
states and foreign).
Attention
Advertisers
Let your voice
reach the students
of Michigan
ADD THE AIRWAVES OF
wri
l aE15

ACCORDING TO HER, the gift-
ed child deserves the opportunity
of receiving an education which
reaches the limits of their poten-
tial.
Knowland
(Continued from Page 1)
China coast and support the Chi-
nese Nationalists on Formosa.
IN 1958, his career in politics
ended abruptly when he quit the
Senate and was defeated in a try
for election as governor of Cali-
fornia.
Knowland lost to Democrat Ed-
mund Brown by more than a -nil-
lion votes. Only six years earlier
he had been reelected to his Sen-
ate seat by the biggest vote in
California history.
He became president and editor
of the Tribune in 1966 on the de3th
;of his father, Joseph Knowland.
California Gov. Ronald Regan
praised Knowland for his integr'ty1
and the Tribune's objective re-
porting.

(Continued from Page 1)
incident.
PAMP, THE FIRST speaker,
gave an unscheduled talk on rac-
ism experienced by native Ameri-
cans, centering on Wounded Knee
but making it clear that "Michigan
is just as racist as South Dakota,
but it's a little more subtle about
it."
Speaking of the less urban coun-
try in northern Michigan, he said,
"If you go up there, you will find
that you are a 'nigger."'
Pamp cited cases of racism in:
Michigan. He said school children
were being badly treated and were
forced to leave their own homes
to live in boarding schools in Mor-
mon homes.
ALL THREE speakers empha-
sized the enormous amount of faith
and closeness the Indian people
felt towards one another in their
struggle, and their intent to over-
come their obstacles or die in the
attempt.
And although the rally got off to
a late start due to the late arrival
of Bellacourt, few of the partici-
pants left during the hour of
waiting.
The meeting concluded with the
sound of the drums and the voices
of the speakers raised in the tra-
ditional victory song of the In-

were recovered at the Williams' economic.
home when the two were arrested "But if this is a political move-
but the FBI would describe it only ment, my feeling is that it is the
as a "voluminous amount of U.S. most doomed political movement
currency in tens, twenties, fifties in history. It has no real strength
and hundreds." or thought or intelligence behind
THE FBI SAID it would be some it."
Grand jury indcts
(Continued from Page 1) ly $70,000. The special prosecutor
builty and two who were convicted has a staff of some 40 lawyers,
after trial. busy on the myriad probes.
Already three of the burglars President Nixon's Jan. 30 State
are ready to be paroled and three of the Union statement that "one
others are free pending appeals. year of Watergate is enough" and
Once the January 1973 trial was that it was time to bring the in-
past, the jury began working on vestigation to an end brought into
post-trial disclosures by James the open a hardening of White
McCord, Dean and Magruder. House attitudes toward giving Ja-
Its indictment won't be returned worski material for his work.
until after a jury is picked and JAWORSKI complained to the
sequestered in the Mitchell-Maur- Senate that "it is now clear that
ice Stans, trial in a federal court evidence I deem material to our
in New York. Prosecutors feared investigations will not be forth-
the New York jury could be in- coming."
fluenced should there fe further As of late last week, the indi-
indictments against the two men. cations were that he would not
THROUGH the end of January, wait for the additional evidence
grand jury fees amounted to near- before bringing charges.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I

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dian people.

--R V-T
ANN ARBOR CIVIC TH EATRE

I

AUDITIONS
FOR

Music School: Univ. Symphony Band,
0. Cavender, conductor, Hill Aud.. 3
pm.
j . Monday, February 25.
ICommission for Women: Secretaries,
sub-committee, Wolverine Rem., Union,
noon.
SACUA Meeting: 4078 Admin. Bldg.,
2 pm.
Germanic Langs., Lits., Ctr. Coord.
Ancient, Modern Studies: H. Gadamer,
Heidelberg U, Germany, 'mPro'etheus
in the Greek and German View," Lec.
Hall 2, MLB, 4 pm.
Slavic Langs., Lits.: M. Lesiow, Univ.
of Lublin, vis. Prof. Harvard U. "The

Influences of Polish on the East
Slavic Languages. 16-18th Centuries,"
E. Conf. Rm., Rackham Bldg., 4 pm.
Physics: J. Rosner, U of Minn., "The
Search for Charmed 'Fartcles," P-A
SBldg. Colloq. Rm., 4 pm.
Physics:J3. Luxon, "The New Michi-
gan g-Factor Experiment," 2038' Ran-
dall Lab, 4 pm.
Ctr. Study Higher Educ.: N. Bir.
baum, Amherst Call., "A Critique of
the Carnegie Commission on Higher
Ecucation," Assembly Hall, Rackham,
8 pm.
Music School: Duets program, E.
Mosher, L. Guinn, Rackham Aud., 8
pm.

Our MAY Musical

11

the

TUESDAY, Feb. 26 at 4:00 p.m.
Room 200, LANE HALL
Prof. Yehoshafat Harkabi
OF THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY
former head of Army intelligence and strategic research
for the Defense Ministry of Israel
TOPIC: Historic Roots of the.Aab-1s-,
rael Conflict and the Prospects for the,
Future.
Sponsored by
the Center for Near Eastern Studies

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MrMrr
..:.......

n Color"

Monday, February 25 through Friday
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED
Sponsored by the Anthroposophical S
ciation and The Rudolph Steiner Ins
Great Lakes Area.

nball:
5p.m. ,
7-9 p.m.
Y, March 1
tudent Asso-
titute of the

FIRST ANNUAL UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
INVITATIONAL FESTIVAL OF
EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE
FEBRUARY 22-24, 1974
EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCTIONS BY
EIGHT COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY COMPANIES
GUEST CRITICS: Robert W. Corrigan, Martin Esslin, Andre
Gregory, Richard Schnechner
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24:
10:00 a.m.-OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY: "Lucifer" (Arena Theatre)
1:00 p.m.-OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY iRepeat performance)
3:00 p.m.-ANTIOCH COLLEGE: "Show Me a Good Loser And I'll
Show You a Loser" (Trueblood Theatre)
7:00 p.m.-GRIFTELL COLLEGE: "But This Is Not 'War" (Arena
Theatre)
8:30 p.m.-GRINNELL COLLEGE (Repeat performance)
10:00 p.m.-Public Discussion/Critique with guest critics
There's Morel Four to six non-university companies will perform
concurrently in the FRINGE FESTIVAL. From many parts' of the
country, these groups will perform at several campus locations.
TICKETS on sale at Trueblood Box Office beginning Fri., Feb. 22
BOX OFFICE HOURS: Saturday and Sunday 9-8:30 p.m.
ADMISSION: .50 PER PERFORMANCE
INFORMATION: 764-0450
210 S. FIFTH AVE.
ANN ARBOR
761-9700
Youve been BLACULA-RIED and
SUPERFLYED-but now yodre gonna be
glorified and filled-with-pride...
when you see
BLaCK HilD
AwV "-t'-,

CRISLER ARENA, U of M Campus

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