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February 16, 1974 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-16

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I r-1t IVIR.A-1IUAIN UAIL'I' Saturday, February 16, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, February 16, 1974

iur I Budget top issue in primaries

ten yo
belt.

Local car sales not
hurt by fuel crisis

fou never had
a trip like this
before..*

City Council primary elections
will be held in the Third and Fifth
Wards Monday, with the city's
budget problems emerging as the
top campaign issue.
In the Fifth Ward, Paul Brown,
a senior editor for University Pub-
lications, squares off against Sheila
Robertson, a city employe,
BOTH CANDIDATES believe the
city's financial condition is the
major problem facing council in
the upcoming year, but differ sig-
nificantly over the rent control and
marijuana ballot questions.

Robertson supports both propo-
sals, which would establish a limit
on landlord profits and reinstate
the city's $5 fine for use and sale
of marijuana.
Brown opposes the measures be-
cause he believes they should not
become part of the City Charter
as is now proposed.
The 32-year-old Robertson would
also like the city to put more em-
phasis on rape prevention. She
wants the police to allocate addi-
tional funds for a rape prevention
squad and to hire significantly
more female officers.
Although he terms the present
local money crisis "a very real
concern that must be faced,"
Brown urges increased allocations
for parks and recreation.
ROBERTSON ALSO backs an
expanded day care system. "Per-
haps we have not gotten such a
program because men have been
consistently elected to council,"
she says.
The Democrat who wins the nom-
ination faces a stiff, uphill battle
during the general election in the
strongly Republican Fifth Ward..

In the Third Ward-the GOP's
most powerful area-only one can-
didate is actively seeking that
party's nomination. Roger Bertoia,
who works at the Washtenaw Com-
munity College, should easily win!
the nomination.
B e r t o i a, who unsuccessfully
sought the Republican nomination
a year ago, should also be an easy
victor in the general election. C
The entire slate of council can-
didates is:'
First Ward:.
Democrat-Collen McGree; Hu-
man Rights Party-Beth Brunton;
Republican-Joyce Hannaum.
Second Ward:
Democrat-Mary Richman; HRPE
-Kathy Kozachenko; Republican-
no candidate.
Third Ward:
Democrat-Joseph Burke; HRP-
H a r r y Kevorkian; Republigan-
Roger Bertoia, Frederick Herr-1
mann.
Fourth Ward:
Democrat - James Kenworthy;
HRP--Margo Nichols; Republican
-William Colburn.
Fifth Ward:3
Democrat - Paul Brown, Sheila
Robertson; HRP-Jesse Hall; Re-I
publican-Louis Belcher.'

ct ue x rayo x OLORBYDOJUXE O 1 GP
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
8 and 10 p.m
COZENS CAFETERIA
Couzens Film Coop

-GET
ATTENTION

By BARBARA CORNELL
The current surge of small car
sales pitches and gas mileage
mania might suggest that the
energy crisis is profoundly ef-
fecting car sales. Yet city car
dealers seem to feel that the fuel
shortage's effect on local buying
is slight.
Tony Marino, general manager
.of the local Chrysler dealer, as-
serted that as many people are
buying big cars now as before
the energy crisis.
"The people who are used to
that big car ride will continue
to buy big cars," he says, al-
though he notes that the energy
crisis has had a somewhat
stimulating effect" on small car
sales.
A SPOKESMAN for Campus
American Motors says it is hard
for him to judge whether small
car sales have picked up, since
his dealership has just expand-
ed. However, he cites a trend
toward intermediate-sized cars.
"I think the ones that are en-
ergy conscious don't move to the
small cars' because they have
families or want the comfort,"
he said. "The intermediate size
car is halfway between the big
size car and the small one."
Try
Daily
Class'ifieds

AP Photo
Exorcise who?
President Nixon gets a decidedly cool reception while dedicating
a Miami hospital Thursday. Although thousands cheered in the
foreground, the back of the crowd made it perfectly clear where
they thought the President should go.

THE SPWKESMAN also notes
that those people who buy
smaller cars are buying just as
many options, if not more, than
they used to. "They (the public)
want to come down to this ener-
gv thing, but they don't want to
give up the comfort," he says.
Used car salesmen don't agree
on whether the energy crisis has
been detrimental or not.
The local American Motors
spokesman says they are having
some trouble in getting rid of
their big cars. "Our business is
good but we're still suffering the
same problems with people want-
ing smaller cars and trading in
their bigger ones."
Yet a Lincoln Continental used
car dealer disagrees. Although
he admits new car sales tend to-
ward smaller cars, he comments
"We're still selling the larger
ones with no problem."
FOREIGN CARS are in as
great demand as ever. William
Walz, a foreign car salesman,
says that since "the volume is
up, the availability is down." He
says the effect of the energy
crisis on foreign cars was in the
delivery rather than the sales:
"It takes oil to get the cars
here.'
Clem Awad of Curt Tdroug
Cadillac is virtually oblivious to
the energy crisis. "Maybe for a
week or two our business fell a
little on used cars, but now our
sales are better than ever," he
r e m a r k s confidently. The
American people never short
themselves of anything. They
want the best and the best is
what we sell."

med iactrics presents
FISTS OF FURY
starring BRUCE LEE
"High-powered martial arts action never stops"
FRI. & SAT. $100 7 and 9:30
NATURAL SCIENCE AUDITORIUM,
NEXT WEEK: SECOND ANNUAL NEW YORK EROTIC ARTS FESTIVAL

Have you applied to live in one of
the ICC Co-ops next Fall?
Are you considering living in one?
Then be sure to come to the
Mass Meeting
SUNDAY, FEB. 17, 1974-1:00 p.m.
MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM
Learn about student-owned housing on campus. The
Central Campus Co-ops will hold open houses for
all those interested in visiting them after the Mass
Meeting.
12 Houses on Central Campus
9 Houses on North Campus
INTER-COOPERATIVE COUNCIL

a

1l

THIS
$2.50

WEEKEND
8:30

FRI.-SAT.
Jean
Corrignan

s .
Third World People'sSldarity Conference
Program of Events
Thursday, Feb. 21-Power Center,
7:30-Introduction, opening of conference
8:00-Pat Sumi, chairperson, Third World Womens Ailiance
9:00-Chicano Theatre, Teatro de los Estudiants
9:40-Ramsey Muniz, co-founder Raza Unida Party, presently gubernatorial
candidate in Texas
10:40-Conclusion
11:00-Questions
Friday, Feb. 22-Hill Auditorium
7:30-Introduction
8:00-Clyde Bellacourt, co-founder American Indian Movement (AIM),
active Native American leader
850-Slide Show
9:'10-ts-Angela Davis
10:00-Workshops
"Stereotypes and Images." "An Awareness among minorities"
Speakers include:
-Aturo Ranjel, graduate student in social work and Political Science
-Phil Haves, graduate student in Asian American Studies
-Moore Pomp, Native American Advocate
Little groups will be formulated in order to have deep discussions
10:00-Workshop
"An Insight into the Minority Communities"
Speakers include:
-Pat Sumi, Third Word Womens Alliance
-Wagner Wheeler, Native American Student Association
-Olga Villa, Midwest Council of La Roza and other informed persons
10:00-Workshop
"International Issues"
-Beatrice Berry, Black Africa
-Southeast Asia, a member of Indochina Peace Campaign
Fri. Workshops: Michigan League
1:0-MSS Saturday, Feb. 23
100-MASSRALLY on the Diag to support sisters and brothers at the
Wounded Knee trials
Speakers include:
-Eddie Bentin, Native American leader, Minnesota
-Clyde Bellocourt
200-Workshop
"Campus Politics: Misrepresentation and Repression"
Speakers include:
-Ted Liu, co-direc.tor of Minority Affairs Commission,
Student Govt. Council
-Lee Gill, former president of Student Govt. Council
-Lydia Ortiz, active member of Chicano at Michigan,
co-director of Minority Affairs Commission, SGC
-Marcia Fishman, council person for Student Govt. Council
3:00-Workshop
"The Racist Nature of Our Education"
Speakers include:
-Arturo. Marroquin, Professor of Psychology at U of M
-Les Owens, director of Afro-American Studies
-Bill Wei, Doctoral Candidate for Chinese Studies, member of Eastwind
-Kevin Hart, Native American Student Association
4:00-Workshop
"Minority Programs: The Need and the Absence"
Speakers include:
-Wagner Wheeler, Native American Student Association
-Richard Garland, the Black Advocate
-Homero de Ia Crus
5:00-Workshop
"National Issues"

I

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Room 3N, Michigan Union
662-4414

W/ Gilles Losier
virtuoso fiddle
music
142111 ill TT

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mmmommmomw

last TONIGHT
KEN KESEY'S

shows

Sometimes a Great Notion
Paul Newman Lee Remick Henry Fond1a
-AND-

Faye Dunaway Warren Beatty

I 1

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