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February 15, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



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Cin em
Connection and Kung
Fu
Chinese Students Club; Schorling
Aud., Ed. School
Fri., 7, 9
In many ways, kung fu flicks
are like pornography: they are
low-budgeted, they lack a notice-
able plot, the camera work is of
Super 8 quality, the actors have
all the talent of candied yams,
and, most of all, they do nothing
but show experts performing a
type of physical activity to ex-
cess for the entire duration of
the film.
In this sense, Bruce Lee is the
kung fu movie's answer to Linda
Lovelace. Both are famous for
their physical prowess; however,
quite unlike Lovelace, Lee's tal-
ent consists of being able to de-
molish hundreds of other people
with only his hands and feet in
the course of two hours.
If this is your idea of enter-
tainment, then you're in luck: the
Chinese Students Club is shov-
ing The Chinese Connection, di-
rected by and starring the late
Bruce Lee, as well as the pilot
for David Carridine's TV series
Kung Fu.
Fists of Fury
UAC-Mediatrics; Nat. Sci. Aud.
Fri., Sat., 7, 9:30
Also showing this weekend is
Fists of Fury, another Bruce
Lee film.
-JAMES HYNES
* * *
The Garden of the
Finzi-Continis
Cinema II; Aud. A
Fri., Sat., 7, 9
Garden is a fine Vittoria de
Sica film about the beginning of
Mussolini's persecution of the
Jews in 1938. The film revolves
around an aristocratic, Jewish
family, the Finzi-Continis, and
their refusal to accept what is
going on in the world outside
their garden. One of theymem-
bers of the family (played by
Dominique Sanda) rejects her
poor Jewish lover (Helmut Ber-
ger) for a wealthy Gentile, only
to still find herself in the same
predicament as the rest of he:
family by the end of the film.
Garden is a good but rather
depressing study about the splin-
tering of a society under t h e
strain of racism; it won the best
foreign film Academy Award in
1970.
-JAMES HYNES

weekend...

Bonnie and Clyde
Assassination of Trosky
Sometimes a Great
Notion
Friends of Newsreel;MLB 3 &4
Fri.: Nation and Trotsky,
'7:30, 9:30
Sat.: Notion and
Bonnie, 7:30, 9:30
With Bonnie and Clyde, Arthur
Penn (Little Big Man, Alice's Re-
staurant) succeeded John Ford
as the Great American Director.
Exploring a distinctively Ameri-
can theme - violence - in a
distinctively American style, he
presents the story of C I y d e
Barrow and Bonnie Parker, the
famous Dust Bowl outlaws of the
1930s.
Faye Dunaway and Warren
Beatty play Bonnie and Clyde as
lovable bank robbers, carefree
killers who don't mean any harm.
The excelcnt cast also includes
Michael J. Pollard and Gene
Haokman. The film is definite-
ly one of the best American mov-
ies of the 1960s.
Assassination of Trotsky is ai
flawed film by a fine. director,
Joseph Dosey (A Doll's House).
The film wavers between drama
and ideology and, as a result,
lacks unity. Still, even Losey's
mistakes are well worth see-
ing. The film stars Richard Bur-
ton as the exiled Trotsky and
Alain Delon as his assassin.
Both films appear as double
features with Sometimes a Great
Notion, a good adaptation of the
Ken Kesey novel, starring Paul
Newman and Henry Fonda. Fon-
da gives one of the best per-_
formances of his career.
-JAMES HYNES
Serpico
Exorcist
Briarwood
Unfortunately, most topical
movies of late have had the nasty
habit of becoming too pompons
and, on the whole, rather unbe-
lievable. Serpico, however, is a
fine example of how a film can
wrestle with a controversial suno-
joct and come out on top.
Al Pacino exquisitely portravs
Serpico, a Greenwich Village in-
tellectual who decides to become
a New York City police officer.
Disgusted by rampant corrup-
tion among patrolmen, he com-
plains to his superiors, but each
time receives the same blunt an-

swer - an order to keep hi3
damn mouth shut.
Easily Sidney Lumet's b e s t
movie, Serpico also happens "o
be Dino' De Laurentis's first film
since moving his operations from
Rome to New York. It's defin-
itely a must-see flick, and re-
ceives Cinema Weekend's num-
ber one nod for this week.
-DAVID BLOMQUISTj
Well, kiddies, guess what's the
latest subject in the never-end-
ing series of Hollywood exploita-
tion movies? None other than the
Christian church! That's right,
friends, Warner Brothers h a s
journeyed past the limits of real-
ity - and good taste - to bring
you The Exorcist.
Here we have the story of a
Satanically possessed girl in a
movie that should be ecological-
ly repossessed. This two-hour
"blasphemy" does nothing but
add a whole new dimension to
the word "puke."
So, friends, if you happen to
be in the mood to get it all out
of your system - at once - or
have a strange fixation for the
color red, Exorcist is your mov-
ie. And finally, remember that
the worst may be yet to come:
rumor has it that the subject
for Warner's next exploitation
flick (God forbid) is apple pie!
-STEVE STAHOS
Five on the Black Hand
Side
Fifth Forum
After two years of producing
almost nothing but trash for the
black film market, Hollywood
may have finally come up with a
winner in Black Hand Side.
In only 12 weeks, the film
has already rolled up an impre-
sive list of boosters, including
Congressional black caucus la-
er Charles B. Rangle, who wrote
a favorable review and had it
printed in the Congressional Re-
cord.
The flick only cost United t'r-
tists $650,000 to make, and has
no name stars in the cast. Yet
its relatively non-violent natijre
appears to be sselling well.
-DAVID BLOMQU 1ST
Also .. .
Woody Allen's Sleeper is stil
with us at the Michigan; Deliver-
ance and Last of Shiela retL'n
for another run at the Campus;
and Don't Look Now continues
for another week at the State.

t

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S- medi-atri -presents
ISTS OF FURY
starring BRUCE LEE
"High-powered martial arts action never stops"
F R I.& SAT. $100 7and 9:30
NATURAL SCIENCE AUDITORIUM
NEXT WEEK: SECOND ANNUAL NEW YORK EROTIC ARTS FESTIVAL

John Houseman

Houseman cites
theater'~s rise

By DAN BORUS
John Houseman, whose color-
ful career spans more than four
decades in television, films, and
the stage and whose stately eye-
brows testify to that career,
came to Trueblood Theater yes-
terday and delivered a "State of
the Theater" address.
Here in conjunction with the
City Center Acting Company's
productions of Beggar's Opera
and Measure for Measure, House-
man offered not a theory, of
theater or a recital of his per-
sonal experiences.
Instead he advanced the pro-
position that if the theater is to.
survive, the miracle of com-
unication between life human
beings, both on the stage and in
the audience, must continue to be.
a viable one.
"Of course, I believe it will,"
he added.
The sprightly Houseman, dress-
ed in the same conservative at-
tire he fashioned in the role of
the law professor in The Paper
Chase, reminded an audience of
200 or so drama students that the
medium is one with a limited
,circulation.
"In the course of one night,
more people will watch a single
television show than will watch
all the plays in the course of one
year.
"Yet, the impact of great
theater is certainly as important,
if not more important culturally
than other media.
"Orson's (Welles) Mercury
Theater production of Julius
Caesar (Welles dressed the con-
soirators in the uniforms of
Hitler's SS troops) probably
touched more people in a deep,
significant way than my movie
production of the same work.
Though we used Shakespeare's
words, we never operated under
the assumption that we were
producing that play. It was an
entirely different thing," House-
man said.
Yet despite the limitedness of
circulation, this vital form of
entertainment is undergoing an
upsurge in appeal, the noted
director and producer maintain-

ed. Though theater was hard hit
by the Depression, the rise of
competing media, the maturation
of tastes which commercial
theater (read Broadway) has not
really read, there has been a
marked rise in regional repe-
toires in the last decade.
Houseman attributed this phe-
nomenon to a growth in the in-
terest of liberal arts colleges in
the performing arts in general
and in theater in particular.
Thomgh liberal arts colleges have
produced theater majors, it
hasn't been until recently that
jbs could be found. Today
Houseman estimates that there
are a "good four dozen regional
renetoire theaters."
"Sich growth has produced a
danger," Houseman w a r n e d,
"what is being done is the safe,
the well known. Having been
formed with classical theater as
a basis, these groups are hesi-
tant to commission new works."
Regional theater, like all good
theater and all organic art forms,
Horseman maintained, needs new
work to continue functioning. Al-
ready resistance on the Part of
trustees has begun to harden and
this may Prove to be a crisis
point for the art.
"New York theater is not the
place for inspiration," Houseman
aruled. "Tt is on the skids.
"Theater will exolode when the
language reaches a boiling point.
When Orson and I worked in
the Federal Theater during the,
Depression, it was a tremendous-
ly exciting period. At first there
was agit-prop, worker's play's
and strike pieces. But this con-
ditioned a demand for more and
different theater. Julius Caesar
comes directly from that experi-
ence.
"The language is probably at a
boiling point again and more
works should be in the offing," he
said.
"Eventually," Houseman con-
cluded in response to a question
from an obvious drama major,
"the bubble will burst. But at
present my company has enough
booking requests for a season of'
eighty weeks."

EVERY MONDAY NIGHT IS GUEST NIGHT! t
You and a Guest admitted for .nly $2.25
(Two admitted for the price of one)
{I_ EXCLUSIVELY AT THESE BUTTERFIELD THEATRES-
MICHIGAN, STATE, CAMPUS, WAYSIDEOc

Quartt appoaches greatness,

TODAY DELIVERANCE AT 7:15 ONLY & LAST OF SHEILA
AT 9 P.M. ONLY. SAT. & SUN.: SHELIA AT 1:15, 5 & 9;
DELIVERANCE AT 3:15 & 7:10

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Theatre : Phone468-6416

THE
NEXT
MOVE IS
MURDER

p
l
U

J4
4

By JEFF SELBST
The Stanley Quartet, in a per-
formance at Rackham Auditor-
ium Wednesday night, mustered
an almost excellent rendition of
a well-balanced program.
The Quartet consits of Percy
Kalt, violin; Jerome Jelinek,
cello: Benning Dexter, piano;
and its senior member, Robert
Courte, viola. It was founded in
1948 by Prof. Emeritus Gilbert
Ross, and Courte joined t h e
group in 1951. Until 1972 the
Quartet had been an all-string
ensemble, but Benning Dexter
joined the group at that time,
replacing the other violin.
The group played Beethoven's
Quartet in E-Flat Major, Op. 16,
Brahms' Quartet in G Minor, Op.

25, and Dohnanyi's Serenade for
String Trio, Op. 10.
The Beethoven piece, origin-
ally written for F r e n c.h horn,
oboe, clarinet, bassoon, a n d
flute, was re-scored for strings
by the composer himself. The
first movement was pleasant,
graceful, in a classical vein.
But the second movement was a
lush bit of romanticism that fea-
tured the piano and the viola in
short solos. The third movement
was very obviously that. In it,
the first two movements are
wrapped up neatly.
The Dohnanyi can be described
variously, depending on which
movement one hears, as eerie,
desperate, lively, driven, erratic,'
or if the piece is taken as a
whole, brilliant.

The Brahms contained, all in
the same opus, an excitingly cli-
mactic first movement, I )ts of
Austrian whipped cream, acid a
gypsy rondo (alla Zingarese) feil-
lowed by a Presto that .ifted she
heart, even if not the crowd to
feet.
The only bad point in the con-
cert was the occasional :our ntte
from the cello and the viola, a?-
though some of that can undoubt-
edly be attributed to tie diffi-
culty of playing woodwind mu-
sic on a string instrument.
Special plaudits must also go
out to the page-turner for the
pianist. Although his name was
not revealed in the program, he
did an admirable job and dis-
played excellent concert manners.

4TOlE
Starring(In Alphabetical Order)
RICHARD BENJAMIN-"DYAN CANNON JAMES COBURN
JOAN HACKETT' JAMES MASON -IAN McSHANE RAQUEL WELCH e

A JOHN BOORMANILM
Starrng JON VOIGHT -TBURT REYNOLDS

I

m

--, .
z. ..:

4th
LAUG
WEEK

p

"A REAL RIP-SNORTER!
...SLEEPER OF
"TERRIFIC" THE CENTURY."
HABLE -Conby, N.Y. Times -VAN WINKLE,
"AK atepe eOnondaga
S"Allen's Masterpiece"Dormitory News
-Newsdo"
WOODY ALLEN
TAKES Atv
NOSTALGIC LOOK
AT THE
FUTURE.
OPEN 12:45
SHOWS AT
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
I OOdy' D a
and
PG '
603 E. LIBERTY * DIAL 665-6290

WABX Presents Thursday, Feb. 21, 7:30 p.m.
SHA NA NA
At MASONIC TEMPLE
TICKETS are $6.50, 5.50, 4.50
Available at Masonic Box Office
and the door the night of the show
FRIDAY, FEB. 22-7:30 P.M.
SHA NA NA
with
BADFINGER
cit the

i

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