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January 10, 1974 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1974-01-10

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Thursday, January 10, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, January 10, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY
0

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Energy Briefs
GENEVA, Switzerland (,) - The world's major oil countries,
which have boosted prices 400 per cent in the last year, pledged
yesterday to hold the line until April 1. But they said industrial
nations would have to show they can control inflation and reduce
the profits of oil companies if the prices are not to rise still more.
The oil-producing nations meeting here said this was necessary
because as inflation rises in industrial countries, the price of
machinery and other products rises and the oil countries have
to hand out more of their profits for the same amount of im-
ported goods. Jamshid Amouzegar, the Iranian finance minister,
made these points at a news conference after a three-day meet-
ing of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. The
14 nation group produces more than half the world's oil..
SALEM, Ore. (1P) - Oregon officials have come up with a
sort of gasoline-by-number plan in an effort to assure all motor-
ists of a fair chance to get fuel, despite shortages. The plans,
which takes effect Monday on a voluntary basis, involves license
plates and the calendar. It limits motorists with even numbered
license plates to gasoline purchases on even-numbered calendar
days during the week. Motorists with odd-numbered plates get
to buy on odd-numbered days. Saturdays are an exception. To
avoid disrupting the recreation industry, the plan provides that
anyone can buy gas on Saturday. Sundays also are a sort of
exception because most of the stations have been closed anyway
as a conservation move. There are other special rules involving
emergency vehicles, salesmen, out of state drivers and people
with license plates that have letters instead of numbers. The
plan was worked out by representatives of Gov. Tom McCall and
the state's 2,700 service stations.
WASHINGTON () -- The Justice Department's antitrust
chief says he hasn't unearthed much evidence that oil companies
conspired to create the fuel shortage, but isn't ruling out the
possibility. Asst. Atty. Gen. Thomas Kauper said antitrust law-
yers have so far been unable to come up with anything tangible
to support the suspicion that the oil companies produced the crisis
to drive up their prices and profits. Kauper said he probably
won't disclose the findings of the department's collusion inquiry
unless it produces a lawsuit. "But I think the assumption will be
if we don't file suit, we didn't find any," he said in an inter-
view. "While I can understand the public's suspicion, there just
is not much hard evidence of collusion," he said. "I just don't
see that there's that kind of evidence, but I'll be damned if I'm
going to say it isn't there."
WASHINGTON (M) - The Federal Trade Commission was
urged yesterday to make big oil and utility companies prove
their claims in energy crisis advertising seeking to improve their
public image. Americans "are being hit by a multimillion dol-
lar propaganda blitz by the energy industry designed to dampen
rising public anger over fuel shortages and unconscionably high
prices and to deflect government action," said Rep. Benjamin
Rosenthal, (D-N.Y.). Rosenthal, Sens. Birch Bayh, (D-Ind.);
Thomas McIntyre, (D-N.H.); Frank Moss, (D-Utah); and Reps.
Les Aspin, (D-Wis.), and Andrew Young, (D-Ga.), joined in a
petition filed with the FTC by Harvey Shulman of a public in-
terest law group called the Media Access Project. Shulman told
reporters this is the start of a "counteroffensive undertaken on
the part of the American people to neutralize a daily propaganda
campaign with which the public is fed up."
EUGENE, Ore. (W) - Ted Birrer, director of the Western
Conference of Petroleum Retailers in Portland, wasn't in his of-
fice when a Eugene newspaper reporter telephoned. "He called
and said he'd be about an hour late," Birrer's secretary said.
"He's out trying to buy some gas."

President sets
oil meeting for

Youngblood resigns
from State Senate

,'February
SAN CLEMENTE (Reuter) - nation
President Nixon moved yester- Ann
day to unite Western industrial- dent's
ized nations in tackling the world ial Ar
oil crisis by inviting six West a thr
European nations, Japan and influen
Canada to top-level Washington States
talks Feb. 11. led th
The President, acting amid as a w
fears the world economy could Israel
be severely damaged by the Arab The
oil cutbacks and sharply in- San C
creased oil prices, also sent per- had b
sonal messages to the heads of Christ
state of oil-producing countries pean
suggesting a later joint confer- their
ence of producer and consume: Washr
-- - ___-_- Britai
Simon hopeful of Italy,
Mos
avoidingraing
ra.lo'li11g are b
WASHINGTON (Reuter) princi
Energy Czar William Simon said ington
yesterday he remains hopeful, out by
but not optimistic, that gasoline Acco
rationing can be avoided this oil-pro
spring. Presid
Simon, who already has drawn Algeri
up a standby gasoline rationing Aeia
program in case the energy sit- Nigeri
uation worsens, said the coun- Niger
try would not be "over the Nix
Ihump" of making a decision on Neexin
rationing until the autumn. meetin
SPEAKING ON CBS radio in can b
an interview, he commented that can b
working on the basic assumption at the
that the Arab oil embargo will Theo
continue, "I don't think I could by pr
see the day before the fall that tionsm
we would be per se over the tary o
hump on making this decision." who h.
He said he remained, "hope- ter of
fuIl and that is hopeful, not opti- Arab-I
mistic" that the government day or
could avoid rationing this spring. die Ea

11

ns.
ouncement of the Presi-
initiative came as a spec-
rab envoy put into top gear
ee-month drive to try tD,
,nce opinion in the United
s, whose pro-Israel policy
he Arabs to use their oil
weapon in their fight against
and its supporters.
Western White House in
Clemente, where N i x o n
een staying since ju:'t after
mas, said the West Euro-
countries invited to send
foreign ministers to the
rington conference were
n, France, West Germany,
the Netherlands and Nor-
st of the eight countries
elieved to have agreed in
ple to attend the Wash-
meeting after feelers put
y the Nixon Administration.
ording to the White House,
oducer states to whom the
dent has put his joiat con-
ce proposal are Aba Dhabi,
a, Ecuador,aGabon, Indon-
Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya,
a, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and
,uela.
on hopes the Washington
ng can come up with a coin-
policy and that this then
e put to the producer states
proposed joint zonference,
oficials said.
idea of joint ac:ion on (,i1
oducer and consumer na-
was first raised by Secre-
of State Henry Kissinger,
imself has been at the cen-
efforts to get i durable
sraeli peace and is off e-
n his third trip to the mid-
st since the October war.

LANSING (UPI) - State Sen.
Charles N. Youngblood Jr., con-
victed Oct. 17 of conspiring to
bribe a state official, resigned
from office yesterday rather than
face a renewed attempt by Re-
publicans to expel him.
The Detroit Democrats agreed
to resign under pressure from his
fellow caucus members after Re-
publicans rejected a proposed
Democratic compromise to per-
mit Youngblood to submi: to
"voluntary suspension" as op-
posed to outright expulsion.
THE REPUBLICANS had said
they would propose a new motion
to expel Youngblood if he did not
resign.

Youngblood, 41, a senator for
12 years, was near tears as he
announced his decision, saying
he regretted that Republicans
would not permit him to "meet
you half way."
After announcing his resigna-
tion, Youngblood left the Senate
floor and his colleagues resum-
ed business as usual, proceeding
to the next item on the Senate
agenda,
Youngolood had resisted earlier
pleas for his resignation - in-
cluding one from top officers of
his own party, saying such an
action would constitute admis-
sion of guilt while his criminal
case is still in the appeals pro-
cess.

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FRIDAY NIGHT, JAN. 11-9:00 PM.
BURSLEY HALL ENTERPRISES presents
THE MARX BROTHERS in
HORSE FEATHERS and
MONKEY BUSINESS
Bursley West Cafeteria
Admission $1.00

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MINI-COURSE 310
CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN ETHICS
Crisis within traditional Christian ethics: historical background;
the relationship of faith and ethics; place of the Bible and tra-
dition. Contemporary debate: consequence versus norm; impor-
tance of both and role assigned to each by contemporary ethi-
cians.
Structure of an ethical system: use of authority; metaphysics,
situation, consequences.
Agape: love ethics of modern man.
Selected problems: death and dying; genetics engineering.
FIRST SESSION-JANUARY 16,
4:00 TO 6:00 P.M., RM. 1402 MASON HALL
1 credit pass-fail winter term. Sponsor: James Flanagan
Drop-Add or more information: Program on Studies in Religion
1053 LS&A BUILDING-764-4475

11

PROJECT COMMUNITY
Child Care and Development Program
* For students wanting to do volunteer work in
child care centers and homes 6 or more hrs./wk.
" Course credit available in psychology, education
and A&D.
* Come into office or to Thurs. meeting to sign up.
ORIENTATION & PLACEMENT
JAN. 1-8 P.M.
FACULTY CLUB LOUNGE, 1st floor Union
Coordinator: SKIP TAUBE M-F, 2-5 p.m.
2204 MICHIGAN UNION-763-3548

I

FACTS ON ABORTION
YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT:
* Abortions are legal in Michigan and easily available for early
pregnancies
* Early abortions need not cost more than $150, for total care
- Some clinics are better than others
0 U of M counseling and medical staff have approved
KEEMER CLINIC ..... ..... 1-961-9779
SUMMIT MEDICAL CENTER ... 1-272-8450
WOMEN'S.HEALTH SERVICE .. 1-272-2100
* All the above clinics perform free pregnancy testing and pro-
vide counseling services

" Late abortions (over 12 weeks from the last menstrual period)
must be performed in a hospital

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