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September 08, 1973 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-08

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f

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

)aturdoy, September 8, 19/3

I1

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BOWLING LEAGUES
NOW FORMING

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Wholesa-
(Continued from Page 1)
BUT AFL-CIO President George;
Meany said the latest figures were
"'beyond belief" and'demonstrateda
that President Nixon's "economic
game plan, freeze and phases are
an absolute failure."
Castigating Nixon for his veto of
the $2.20 hourly minimum wagel
bill, Meany asked, "How in the

name of simple decency can the,
President deny the worst paid
workers in America an increase int
their minimum wage when they
have to pay these prices when theyj
reach the retail level?"
Last month's boom in wholesale
prices was clearly triggered by
the President's order lifting the
price freeze on all foods July 18,:

except for the non-farm ceilings,
on beef prices,
THE 23 PER CENT gain in raw
farm products in August was more'
than triple the record for any
previous monthly advance.
Between Aug. 14, when the fig-;
ures were compiled, and Sept. 6,
foresaw no similar decline, fori

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CALVIN MALEFYT
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prices advance to

record level Speakers

j

Local
(Continued from Page 1)
will go up by 12c or more
next few months, chicken
also rise and fish prices w
crease as much as 15c to 2
pound each month.
"We are not going to se
great spirals upward,'" s
Great Scott spokesperson, "1
are not going to see last
prices either."
"The price freezes hav
rupted the normal flow o

OUTLOOK BLEAK
foodprces climl
ducts," explains the Wrigley man- the burden on beef," he adds.
in the ager, "but I don't know how bad D. Lengel, manager of the lo-
prices the inflation would have been with- cal A&P store, reports a rising
vill in- out them. Profits have been de- number of meat thieves, who con-
Dc per clining during the freezes and centrate mainly on steak and add
causing heavy costs to national to his costs of business.
e any chains."
says a CITING ANOTHER .local trend,
but we "WE ARE paying substantially Lengel notes 'a sharp increase in
year's
higher prices to our wholesalers, the sale of tuna, noodles, canned
e dis- but can not raise our prices as re- stews and spaghetti-all considered
f pro- tailers. The food chains are taking meat substitutes.
-- - ----fo can- Having varied in cost by as much1

Agriculture Secretary Earl Butz example, in automobile prices. ! h a s1 "u ,"
said, wholesale farm prices had! THIS MIGHT explain why the
dropped by 11 per cent, signaling! Cost of Living Council ordered a
an eventual decline at the super- 10 to 30 per cent reduction in the
market. price increases of new models of rotes)
The figures, Butz said, illustrate passenger and commercial vehicles
his contention that "when farm made by the nation's four biggest
prices go' up they usually come car companies. (Continued from Page 1)
dlown later, but when other prices
dow lathe butwhen the p." The ordered reductions brought have our tuition increase," declar-
down the average price increase ed Gill. He encouraged students to
for the cars and truck of Ford sign SGC petitions pledging refusal
1from 106 to 74 dollars, of General to pay the first of three tuition
Motors from 102 to 73 dollars, of installments, due Sept. 28.
Chrysler from 70 to 51 dollars and WHILE A HANDFUL of police-
of American Motors from 61 to 55 men and University security offi-
dollars.cers looked on, the rally remained
hg h e r Do Paarlberg, director of eco- peaceful and up-tempo but was
nomics for the Agriculture Depart- marked by a curious incident.
quality or quantity of the food ser- ment, said post-freeze jumps in A middle-aged woman burst
vice." retail beef prices might not be as through the doors of the Grad
Orr offers one hopeful note. "We great as some have feared. Library and rushed toward an un-
have information as of today, the official "Yippie" speaker who was
beef market is opening up. oday,That "THIS HAS got to be conjec- in the midst of blasting "Adolph
beefh mareisty opning upshat "tural," Paarlberg said. "But we've Nixswine's" foreign policy. He re-
is, the availability, not cost." had some indication already of linquished the bullhorn and the
consumer resistance to high meat woman shouted in an emotional
ASKED IF the University's food prices and with this mood in the voice, "You young people, you
service would stoop to buying market and a larger supply com- should talk about Amalrik and Sak-
horsemeat, Orr says he has given ing in, we might not get all that harov, what the Soviet Union is
strict orders that beef not of U.S. much of an increase in prices." doing to them."
choice quality can not be used, The worst of the supply pinch hit But several members of the audi-
with the exceptions of stew meat consumers after July 18 when the ence shouted her down and she
and rib roast. The latter are within slowdown in movement of cattle fled back into the library.
the standards of U. S. Good Grade. to market led beef packers in ANDREI AMALRIK and Andrei
One A&P sales manager sum- many areas to close, leaving some Sakharov are two of the many
med up the whole food price pic- retail stores without some cuts at Soviet intellectuals who have been
ture with the comment, "I have no times. the victims of harassment and po-
good news to offer the consumer." Beef production plunged as much litical pressure from the Soviet
as 20 per cent below levels of a government in recent years. The
year earlier and many food chains woman spoke with a thick Eastern
began buying live cattle direct European accent and disappeared
from feed lots and processing them before reporters were able to inter-
I' under "custom slaughter" deals. view her.

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as 40c in the past eight months,
eggs have leveled off in sales. One
sales manager reports this is due
to customer resentment of having
to pay as much as a dollar a doz-
en. Egg availability and produc-
tion are also down, he reports, so
he predicts the drop in price will
be short-lived.
Milk, which has gone up as much
as 2 c a gallon each week in re-,
recent months will probably go up
7c more because, according to the
A&P spokesperson, "the farmers
need it to break even."
STUDENTS LIVING in the dorms
are also feeling that they aren't
getting enough food for their dol-
lar - and with the recent short-
ages, some have complained that
the University is simply too re-
strictive with their funds.
John Feldkamp's right - hand
man, Claude Orr, comments that
it is'simply a matter of availabili-
ty, not cost. Yet the shortage of
beef, fruit, and some vegetables
will not, he emphasizes, "under
any circumstances, reduce the

.

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you
see
news
happen
call
76MDAILY

HRP seeks. changes
in city marijuana law

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(Continued from Page 1)J
marijuana fine, which set a $5
penalty for use and sale of the
drug, during a stormy meeting last
July. The fine was originally en-
acted by a Democratic - HRP co-
alition on the previous council.
THE PETITION campaign seeks
to reinstate that law as a charter
amendment, - with one m a j o r
change. If approved the amend-
ment would still allow the fine to
be paid in the same manner as a
parking ticket, but city police could
not turn persons arrested for using
marijuana over to county authori-
ties for prosecution under state
statutes, as was done in the past.
"HRP sees this addition as the
first, small step towards commun-
ity contrgl of the police depart-
ment and its policies," comments
Schoichet.

Once the required signatures are
collected the state attorney gen-
eral's office must approve the ac-
tual wording of the charter amend-
ments as they will appear on the
ballot. The governor must also give
rubber - stamp consent to the
amendment, but HRP anticipates
no opposition to the measures.
"A COURT COULD conceivably
declare the marijuana amendment
unconstitutional but that possibil-
ity is so remote as to be dis-
counted entirely," Shoichet says.
Shoichet expresses confidence
that the marijuana charter amend-
ment will easily be approved by
the voters. "If people who smoke
dope come out and vote, we will
win with that constituency alone,
but many non-smokers believe it's
a gross injustice to make arrests
for marijuana use," he explains.

CC/v w Oc/Pk4J/4k ~enoice4

COME ON IN OUT OF OF THE COLD
Aror Frest Is
A short walk to campus, a warm sauna,
good people, concerned management.
A community.
* electronic security
9 individual or joint leases
* and more
Have a cup of coffee with us at 721 S.
FOREST and we'Il fill you in on the rest.

CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division
665-0606
Holy Eucharist at Noon in St,
Andrew's Church.
Tuesday, Sept. 11th - Holy Eu.
charist at 4:45 p.m. in St. Andrew's
Church.
* 4* *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC, LCA)
801 S. Forest (Corner of Hill St.)
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
Worship- Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

ISRAELI
DANCING
with
Zipporah Irope
Sunday, Sept. 9
12:30 p.m.
Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill Street

CAMPUS CHAPEL ? UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
1236 Washtenaw Ave. CHAPEL (Lutheran Church-
Student Chapel of the Reformed Missouri Synod)
Tradition. 1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Services at 10 a.m. and 6 p.m., Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
- Sunday. Sunday Morning Services at 9:15
* * * and at 10:30.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday Morning Bible Study at
1432 Washtenaw Ave. 9:15.
Ministers: Robert E. Sanders, John Wednesday Evening Worship at
R. Waser, Brewster H. Gere, Jr. 10:00.
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Sundays. ! ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOAL
Holy Communion 5:15-5:45 Wed- CHURCH, 306 S. Division
nesdays.1 8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
Bible Study, 12:00 noon Tues- 10:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and
days. Sermon.
Special event Sunday, Sept. 9- 12:00 noon - Canterbury House
4:00 p.m., includes supper. Open- Eucharist.
ing Event for students and other 7:00 p.m. - Holy Eucharist in
young adults. chapel.
ii he. 99
1974 "ichi anensian"
ON SALE NOW
at Student Pub. Business Office
420 Maynard

BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
Minister: Dr. T. L. Trost, Jr.
Associate Ministers: Dennis R.
Brophy and Howard F. Gebhart.
9 a.m.-Morning Prayer.
10 a.m. - Worship Service and
Church School.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Services-10:00 a.m.
l FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH and WESLEY FOUNDA-
TION-State at Huron and Wash.
Worship Service-10:00 a.m.
Nursery Care-9:45-11:15 a.m.
Church School-10:00 a.m. (thru
Grade 5).
Broadcast on WNRS (1290) AM
and WNRZ (103) FM from 11:00 to
noon.
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING RESULTS

(Continued from Page 1)
plaints of alleged administration
deception, wiretapping, lack of
SWhite House cooperation in con-
sulting Congress on foreign pol-
icy, the Middle East, relations
with the Soviet Union and hostilities
in Indochina.
Seeking to calm fears he might
continue to refuse testimony behind
the White House shield of execu-
tive privilege, Kissinger said:
"In my new capacity I s h a 11
be prepared to testify formally on
all my activities. I will not claim
executive privilege in ' either ca-
pacity of secretary of state or{
White House assistant except for
the one area customarily invoked

by Cabinet officers; that is direct
communications with the Presi-
dent on actual deliberations of the
National Security Council."
KISSINGER impassively defend-
ed past telephone surveillance of
some members of his National Se-
curity Council staff, saying- then
FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover and
Attorney General John Mitchell
had suggested wiretaps as the most
effective way of suppressing news
leaks.
Similarly, he sought to blunt
charges by committee members
that the administration had given
Congress false information on the
secret 1969-70 bombing of Cam-
bodia.
"It was a very peculiar situa-
tion," he said. "In the unbeliev-
able circumstance that it might
arise again, we must find a way
to inform the congressional com-
mittees."

Kissinger defends
'wiretaps on aides

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668-7622 665-0606 Z4-P
WORSHIP SERVICE: Sunday, 10:30 a.m. HOLY EUCHARIST at Noon
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