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December 01, 1973 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-12-01

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Page Two

I HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, December 1, 1973

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-A

OQAND OPENING
The Vita e Green
of Ann Mb
North CampTuOSTowces
an all adult community
Known for our fine management we announce our most
elegant effort ... the room at the top is only surpassed
by the view from the top.
" outdoor swimming pool closed circuit TV security
" lake " patio or balcony
" tennis courts " across from U of M North
" saunas Campus
" exercise rooms " elegant living in an elegant
" lounge setting
One and two bedrooms from $200
Visit our model 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Or phone for an
appointment 662-6670.
129 Plymouth Road
SAnn Arbor
M

S..
POTTERS GUILD
. CH RISTMAS SA LE :
..
I: DECEMBER 2
9 A.M.-3 P.M.
201 Hill St.
Ann Arbor:.
.: . .. .. . 1 . a . . * -
THE BALD SOPRANO?
by EUGENE IONESCO
Nov. 29, 30 & Dec. 1 & 2
li p.m.
at the

POLITICAL CONCESSIONS MADE
Japan s economic vulnerabiity
exposed as Arabs reduce oil

TOKYO (Reuter) - Japan has
demonstrated lately its extreme
vulnerability to economic black-
mail.
The postwar Japanese econom-
ic miracle, from war devasta-
tion in 1945 to the world's third
largest economic power today, '
has been built largely on ready
access to cheap overseas raw '
materials.
TURN THE tap off for any
major basic commodity - as the
Arabs have done with oil - and
the repercussions for Japan are
far-reaching.
When Arab producers decided
to use their oil as a political
weapon in the battle against
Israel, Japan's weakness w a s
quickly exposed.
The first effect was to destroy
the image of the all-powerful yen.
It has been devalued in foreign
exchange market dealings in a
switch to the much-abused Amer-
ican dollar.

JAPAN'S EXTERNAL reserves
have been stripped of billions
of dollars partly as a result, and
this decline is expected to con-
tinue into next year.
The balance of payments pic-
ture has been getting gloomier
each month and is likely to get
worse as cuts in industrial pro-
duction bite into the exports on
which Japan depends for econ-
omic survival.
There has been an escalatio-i
of the country's chronic inflation
and signs of public panic in
stampedes to hoard basic neces-
sities of life.
ZERO ECONOMIC growth -
when the nation is accustomed
to something around 10 per cent
a year and considers five per
cent a recession - is predicted
for the next few months at least.
Politically, Prime Minister Ka-
kuei Tanaka has had to abar-
don his ambitious, costly plans
for rebuilding Japan, and inter-

nationally, the Japanese h a v e
demonstrated that, when threat-
ened with a cutoff of vital raw
materials, they are willing to
sacrifice basic tenets of their
foreign policy.
With the economy threatening
to collapse like a house of cards
under the Arab oil threats, the
Tokyo government has been forc-
ed to abandon its traditional
fence-straddling posture in world
affairs and take sides in a con-
flict thousands of miles away.
OIL PROVIDES 77 per cent of
Japan's energy needs, over 99
per cent of it having 4o be im-
ported. The government has or-
dered a crash program to seek
alternative energy sources, but
it will be years before the na-
tions dependence on oil can be
significantly lessened.
Arab producers supply 42 per
cent of Japanese oil imports and
these have largely been subject
to restrictions because this coun-

try was not considered sufficient-
ly pro-Arab. In addition, most of
the oil is handled by major
Western oil companies who in
many cases are applying even
severer oil restrictions than the
Arabs.
As a result, Japan faced a
long, hard winter of dwindling
supplies and fast shrinking re-
serves.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 71
Saturday, December 1, 1973
Is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio) ; $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail iotber
states and foreign).

,i

SOME OF ANN ARBOR'SI
FINEST SHOPS
WILL BE OPEN THIS
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2
and EVERY SUNDAY Until CHRISTMAS...
OPEN NOON 'TI L 6 P.M.
IT'S ALL HAPPENING ON
I
STREETS
' Shoesbyf Sans Soud i
522 E. William 161-9891
IN THE MAYNARD HOUSE'
"THE" Women's Shoe Store in the area
BEAUTIFUL
Imported and Domestic Quality Leather
Shoes and Boots
CONTINUOUS SALE THROUGH CHRISTMAS

1 si
TICKET!
GALL

lon Gallery
; Floor, Michigan Union

1111

{ '
ji
i
_I '
-

S ON SALE AT
LERY HOURS:

GALLERY-$1.00
10-5 Tues.-Sat.

k
!
z

C/,w'cA W'i'41p en'ice4

university players
presents the second
showcase production
1973-1974
at the ARENA THEATRE in the Frieze Building
and
miss
rea rdon
drinks
a
little
by PAUL ZINDEL
Nov. 29 to Dec. 1
TICKETS: Thursday $1.00; Friday Fs Saturday
$1.50 at Trueblood Box Office.
Box Office open Nov. 26-Dec. 1, 12 Noon fill 5 p. m.
PERFORMANCES AT 8:00 P.M.

CAMPUS CHAPEL THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1236 Washtenaw Ave. 1917 Washtenaw

(1 Block South of Bus Stop)
Worship Services at 10:00 a.m.-
"On Confessing Your Faith."
6:00 p.m. - "Pondering." Holy
Communion.
A Ministry of the Christian Re-.
formed Church.
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOAL
CHURCH, 306 S. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and
Sermon.
12:00 noon - Canterbury House
Eucharist.1
7:00 p.m. - Holy Eucharist in
chapel.

Erwin A. Gaede, Minister
Church School and Services at
10:30 a.m. - Sermon topic: "The
Sustaining Community.''
Adult Forum-9:30 a.m. Discus-
sion topic: "What Has Changed
in the Sheriff's Dept?" Speaker:
Fred Postill, Sheriff.
* * *
CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division
665-0606
Holy Eucharist at Noon in St.
Andrew's Church.
Tuesday, Sept. 11th - Holy Eu-
charist at 4:45 p.m. in St. Andrew's
Church.j

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH (ALC, LCA) CHURCH and WESLEY FOUNDA-
801 S. Forest at Hill TION-State at Huron and Wash.
Donald G. Zill, Pastor Sermon by Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Sunday Morning: -"On Having the Right Enemies."
Study Class-9:15 a.m. 8:30-9:00 a.m.-Communion Serv-
Worship Service-10:30 a.m. ice.
Sunday Supper-6:15 p.m. 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. - Worship
Program-7:00 p.m. Services.
9:00-12:30 p.m.-Nursery Care.
* * * 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. - Church
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN School (thru Grade 5).
CHAPEL (Lutheran Church- 9:30-10:30 a.m.-Church School
Missouri Synod) (Grades 6, 7, and 8).
1511 Washtenaw Ave. .10:30-11:00 a.m. - Coffee-Conver-
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor sation-Fellowship.
Sunday Morning Services at 9:15 Broadcast on WNRS (1290) AM
and at 10:30. and WNRZ (103) FM from 11:00-
Sunday Morning Bible Study at 12:00.
9:15.
Wednesday Evening Worship at FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
10:00. 1432 Washtenaw Ave.
* * * Ministers: Robert E. Sanders, John
BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH R. Waser, Brewster H. Gere, Jr.
OF CHRIST T Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149 ISundays.
Minister: Dr. T. L. Trost, Jr. Verdi Requiem, 3:00. Supper
Associate Ministers: Dennis R.4 (75c) follows.r
dFGebhart. Bible Study Luncheon 12:00 noon
9 a.m.-Morning Prayer. Wednesdays.
10 a.m. - Worship Service and Holy Communion 5:15-5:50 Wed-
Church School. nesdays.
All college students and young
* * * adults are cordially invited. to all
BETHEL A.M.E. CHURCH activities of the church.
John A. Woods, Pastor* * *
900 Plum St. UNIVERSITY REFORMED
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104 CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Church Phone-NO 3-3800 Calvin Mal p, Alan RieoMin.

A

LIYE ENTERTAINMENT ON SUNDAY
Dick Jennings
FOLK SINGER
A moving experience in sound and light
341 S. MAIN ANN ARBOR
Thursday -"Friday -Saturday
NOVEMBER 29-30, DECEMBER 1
EDDIE

EUROPEAN CLOTHING FOR MEN,
OPEN: 11-7 Mon.-Fri.
10-6 Saturday
Noon-5 Sunday
-402 MAYNARD-769-851 1-
IN THE MAYNARD HOUSE
ORTHOGONALITY

t
I
'I
M
M

BOGART

Services:
Sunday School-9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship-10:30 a.m.

%a- Vn aVIU eIyE9 A la, an iUC C , n551
isters
Services at 10:30 a.m.
5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.

HARRIS

COMING
Dec. 6-7-8

Jimmy Reed

340 MAYNARD

ANN ARBOR

r

0 Polish Leather Goods andCanvas Bags
0 Handcrafted Wooden Bowls
* Exotic Potted Plants
9 Norwegian Viking Boots
0 Marimekko Fabrics
Centcore Bookshopsj
FINEST SELECTION OF
I UNUSUAL BOOKS
"IN THE MIDWEST
336 Maynard 1229 South University
IBIVOUAC r
ARMY-NAVY SURPLUS
m 518 E. William 761-6207

TONIGHT and SUNDAY
BOGART and INGRID BERGMAN
CASABLANCA
PETER LORRE, SYDNEY GREENSTREET
Wartime Casablanca is teeming with refugees from fascist ag-
gression. They all go to Rick's Cafe Americaine. In a desperate
kind of way, everything is cool, until she walks in, Dooley Wilson
starts playing "As Time Goes By" on the piano. "Here's looking
at you, kid." 7:30 AND 9:30 AUDITORIUM 3
-AND-
To Have and Have Not
BOGART and BACALL
Screenplay by William Faulkner, produced and directed by Ho-
ward Hawks. Bogart is running a small cabin cruiser out of
Martinique shortly after the fall of France to the Nazis, but
refuses to get involved, until he meets Bacall: "Just whistle; you
know how to whistle, don't you Harry? Just purse your lips and
blow."7:30 AND 9:30 AUDITORIUM 4
Modern Languages Auditoriums
U S ~,_ nrrncen_ .f?,malo on,

01

2333 E. STADIUM BLVD.
below the Frontier Restaurant
(near Washfenaw) Ann Arbor
AMPLE FREE PARKING .
Call 663-9165 for informafion

A1 Musical .Oasis"

C-

D

KRIS KRISTOFFERSON
IN CONCERT
Sat., Dec. 1-8 p.m.
Saginaw Civic Center

TICKETS $4.00, 5.00, 6.00

r

NOVEMBER 24-DECEMBER 8
THE MINERAL KING m
209 S. STATE ANN ARBOR
Phone-769-5188

A4

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