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November 11, 1973 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-11-11

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, November 1

PageTwoTHE ICHGAN AIL

"I would like to be a
cow," Walt Whitman.
If you would like
to be one too,,
come and browse.
AT
DAVID'S BOOKS

Yoghurt sales soar

TO BE SIGNED IN DESERT

New rules

(Continued from Page 1) #
spooned their way through 500 mil-
lion half-pint containers of the
stuff, or some $125 million worth.
DAIRY INDUSTRY marketing
men talk with missionary z e a l
about using advertising to "edu-
cate" consumers about the pleas-
ant taste of yoghurt.
One reason they're so enthus-

209 S. State

663-8441

iastic is that yoghurt is a fairly
high profit item that helps to fat-
ten the skinny earnings of most
dairy operations. Sources say that
the profit, before advertising and
promotion, is about eight cents n
every 32 cent cup of yoghurt, com-
pared with a penny on a 35-cent
quart of milk.
And it is this high markup that
has contributed to the growth of a
new secondary yoghurt industry -
the manufacture of electric yog-
hurt-makers for home production.
BUT THE BIG commercial man-
ufacturers scoff at the possibility
that sales could be dented by a
do-it-yourself trend.

f T h e - 1 '
Paulist
Is modern
man
of today
working for
tomorrow
seeking answers
to the problems
that beset us
in cities and
suburbs
in parishes and
on campus
praying
sharing

counseling
celebrating
i The Paulists
modern priests
on the move
serving Christ
throughout
North America
For more information about the
Paulists, send for THE PAULIST
PAPERS-a new vocation kit of
posters, articles and
recordings.
Write to:
Father Donald C. Campbell,.
Room 103
PaIUlist
Fathers
415 West 59th St., New York, N.Y.10019

Meir OKs truce threatening

RENT CONTROL POLITICS
IN THE FREE MARKET

r

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2
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5

DO YOU GET
25% off of new books in stock?
20% to 10% off on all books
ordered?
Used books at Kamikazi prices?
Free out of print searches?
Only at DAVID'S, 209 S. State
663-8441

(Continued from Page 1)
wire across the shell-pocked road.
There are a few Egyptian mill-
tary police and troops there, two
or three UN oficers and a cl ister
of unshaven Israeli soldiers strol-
ling in the sand or perched behind
machine guns of their halftracks.
There are two dusty little tents
- Egyptian and Israeli -separ-
ated by a few yards of no-man's
land. Thehbackdrop of the historic
spot for halting the fourth .Arab-
Israeli war in 25 years is littered
with battle wreckage.
The Israeli military command
said yesterday that a Liberian oil
tanker hit a mine in the Gulf of
Suez, slightly damaging the ship,
and that Syriannforces directed ar-
tillery fire at an Israeli patrol and
that the Israelis returned small-
arms fire.

BUT A COMMAND spokespersor
in Tel Aviv, Col. Nahman Karni,
emphasized "the incidents were
not very catastrophic and they
have to be kept in perspective."
Meir described two of the most
essential Israel objecti'ns:
* "There should be i cease-tire3
on the sea, in the air and on the
ground," she said. "For it is im-
possible to have a cease-fire in
only one place and have shooting
in another.
* "Secondly, there is a strrng
basis for hope that not much time
will pass - I can say not many
days - when we will see our men
- prisoners - returning from
Egypt."

DentI image
'Continued from Page 1)
T O M W I ED E R, Democratic
chairman of the city's Second
Ward, gave a different perspective.
"The quotas were arbitrary any,
how. One of the problems with the
quotas were that only certain
groups were represented. What
about groups, say, like the white
bluie-collar workers?
"The affirmative action program
is, at best, a speculative venture.
It's so hard to pred ct-you don't
know what the activism will be,"
Wieder said.
Wieder added, "If the thing fails'
and is unrepresentative like pre-
vious ones, you may see mass dis-
sention and people walking away
from the party."

A lecture by:
EV EHRLICH
National Co-ordinator
of Union for Radical
Political Economists
MONDAY
November 12
7:30 P.M.
Multipurpose Room
UGLI
sponsored by: U.G.P.S.A.

II

I

I

th ann arbor film cooperative
is sorry to announce the
CANCELLATION of CABARET
originally listed in our published schedule for this
Wednesday and Thursday, November 14 & 15
IT WILL BE REPLACED BY

I

_ _
a

I

- SKI BANFF

I

II

NEW WORLD FILM CO-OP presents * *

*

I-

i
I
l
r
i
1

MARCH 3-9

LAWRENCE OLIVIER and PETER O'TOOLE in

SLEUTH

(CANADIAN ROCKIES)

Total Cost $250.00

(at 7:00 &9:30 p.m.)

From the director of FIVE DAY
LOVER and THAT MAN FROM
RIO.
Love the Marx Bros., but TIRED
of the Marx Bros.? If so, then
we invite you to witness the most
daring, dashing and swashbuck-
ling comedy since A DAY AT
THE RACES.
JEAN PAUL
BELMONDO
AND
CLAUDIA
CARDINALE
in Phillip de Broca's
CARTOUCHE!N
TUESDAY
NOVEMBER 14

RENATO SALVATORI
AND'
MARLON BRANDO
in Gillo Pontecorvo's
BURN
One of the rare cinematic achieve-
ments of the decade, Pontecorvo
achieves a depth of feeling for the
spirit of his characters that is
rarely achievedby, other film-
makers. Burn was suppressed by
United Artists in this country, and
abroad, forcing Pontecorvo to
change the title from "Quemada"
to "Burn" which would presum-
ably de-popularize the film by
conjuring up visions of inflama-
tory rhetoric and ghetto insurrec-
tions. UA also made Gillo change
the occupier from Spain to Portu-
gal so as not to jeopardize the
market for UA films in Spain.
SEE IT! Brando's favorite
performance.
Wed. & Thurs.
NOVEMBER 15

FELLINI'S

AUDITORIUM "A", ANGELL HALL-$1.00

C
L
0
W
N
S

U
U

TRANSPORTATION: Charter Flight from Windsor,
and bus transfers.
LODGING: 6 nights at the Voyager Inn, 2/room.
SKIING: 5 days lift tickets for Sunshine Village,
Mt. Norquoy and Whitehorn - Temple Ski
areas. Optional glacier skiing available.
APRES SKI: Pools, saunas, night club.
ONLY 17 SPACES LEFTOF 50 TOTAL
OFDEPOSITS: 668-7225, 663-7178 or U-M SKI CLUB

I

1200 protest in.
state capital to
impeach Nixon
(Continued from Page 1)
entertained with anti-Nixon skits
and songs, as a carnival atmos-
phere reigned.
There were numerous signs, in-
cluding one which declared, 'in-
peach Gerald Ford."
"I'm just thinking ahead," said
its carrier, Sean Doyle, a Lan-
sing Community College student
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Sunday, November 11
DAY CALENDAR
Musical Society: The Little Angela,
Power, 8 pm.
Music School: Faculty Chamber Con-
cert, Rackham Aud., 4 pm. (WUOM live
broadcast, 91.7 FM)
Monday, November 12
Science, Technology Future Societies,
Seminar: M. Ross, "Social Implications
of Physical Energy," E. Cons. am., 4th.
fl1. Rackham, noon.
Physics: R. Glauber, Harvard U, P-A
Bldg. Colloq. Rm., 4 pm.

I

Q

"A THEATRICAL MIRACLE!"
-Life Magjazine

~+

THURSDAY
NOVEMBER 16

I

7:30 and 9:30
Modern Languages Aud. 3

7:30 and 9:45
Modern Languages Aud. 3

7;30 and 9:45
Modern Languages Aud. 4
May be seen with BURN, 50c off

PRESENTED BY
Office of Student Life
EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

Nib

Wi

itaso

&e oung.

BOWEN PIELDHOVSE
November 14, 1973
8:30 P.M.
Tickets available at McKenny Union Ticket Booth, Annr
Music Mart, Huckleberry Party Store.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, No. 58
Sunday, November 11, 1973
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-'
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
Arbor area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail htr
states and foreign).

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