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October 23, 1973 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-23

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Tuesday, October 23, 1973

Page Five

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Judy Collins

grows with

her

By DIANE LEVICK
Arts Editor
Old "folkies" never die; they
just fade away -- with the excep-
tion of a few like Judy Collins
who grow with their music. ..
A child of the early 1960's folk
music revival, Collins has de-
veloped into the proverbial ren-
aissance woman, expanding her
repertoire to the fascinating
range she played Saturday night
at Hill Aud. and channeling her
talents into other fields as well.

and quite successfully at that.
"My own classical background,
that's where I go when I'm writ-
ing melodies," she explains.
Her many years of classical
piano lessons under a Madam
Brico, a student of Sibelius, often
show through in her soothing ac-
companiments as in "My Fath-
er."
"In terms of being influenced
by writers," Judy continues,
"I'm quite mad about Joni's
writing - Joni Mitchell - and

ARTS

p

Daily Photo by TOM GOTTLIEB

judy C olims

Bream

relaxes

ill
lute

By JAMES SCHIOP
Julian Bream walked stately
onto the stage of Hill Auditorium
and put the audience at ease.
He sooke softly about the lute,
the unknown instrument he has
built an international reputation
playing. The stout Englishman
placed his left foot on the shin-
ing black support in front of the
lone chair and began his con-
cert by chatting with the audi-
ence.
He explained the format of his
concert-the first half devoted to
17th centuries from England and
Italy. "The soft sounds of the
lute," Bream said, "inay express
the sweet melody of a ballad or
love lyric but- also use its har-
monic texture to accompany
court dancing."
Bream played fantasies, the

uitar

and

then popular dance music called
the galliard, and pavanes (slow
dances) by Molinaro, an Italian
organist and lutenist from Gehoa,
and by the English composer
Robert Johnson.
Joking with the audience, he
said that enough of the pieces
had already been in F major,
so he digressed from the printed
program to conclude his lute
pieces with a John Dowland
pavanetand fantasie in G major.
From the gentleness of Renai:;-
sance lute music, the artist
easily switched to the drama and
melancholia of his guitar.
Bream eased through two fiery
sonatas by Scarlatti and exposed
his Paganiniesque technique in
the dramatic and romantic Sor
second guitar sonata.
He concluded the program with
music composed especially for

himself nine years ago by a
close friend and fellow English
musician, Benjamin B r itt e n,
Bream captured and controlled
the audience with the eerie, ma-
cabre, and sometimes s a d
Nocturnal.
The awesomeness of the famed
artist dissipated as he appeared
at a reception sponsored by the
Medieval and Renaissance Col-
legium following the concert.
As guests sipped medieval mull
wine (red wine, port, brandy,
and spices, heated) Bream jok-
ed about the sour expression of
a portrait adorning the walls of
the Cook Room.
Asked by some to explain the
history of lute music, Bream ex-
plained how much of the lure
music of the Renaissance is stiI
undiscovered but that some iu-
sicologists are engaged in fine
research projects.
Bream couldn't stay long at
the reception: he had to catch a
plane to his next engagement
where he would relax others with
his music and personality.
Hove a flair for
artistic writing?
If you are interest-
ed in revieo n
or writing feature
stories a b o u t the
drama. dance, film.
arts: Contact Arts
E~ditor, c/n The
MichiganDiy

Gone are the days when Judy
sang "If You've Never Made
Love To the Landlady's Daugh-
ter Then You Cannot Have An-
other Piece of Pie." And more
rarely does she record or per-
form the traditional Anglo-Amer-
ican ballads which drew her,
along with Joan Baez, into the
folk field.
Judy found in the ballads "the
content of human experience,
which was so full and so much
more sophisticated" than the pop
music she was hearing in the
lat~e 1950's.
"The kind of thing we're go-
ing bark to now is a sort of camp
rpvival of the 50's," she says
backstage between sets. "It's
pretty emnty and for the most
part banal. It's fashionable now
to plunge back into the past and
die it up as something snecial.
It was pretty much junk that
way on the ra-io in those days."
Turning to folk. the "music with
meaning," Judy picked up on gui-
tar, though even to this day, she
never attempts any fancy tech-
niques. She learned her first
songs fromsuch friends as Dick
Barker and Marty Hoffman,
whose suicide smurred one of
Judv's comoositions.
Making the bid for a profes-
sional singing career, Judy be-
gan hobnobbing with the up-and-
coming songwriters of the early
and mid-60's. It was sleeping in
Bob Dylan's Woodstock attic, for
instance, that she first heard
"Mr. Tambourine Man."
It wasn't long before Judy tried
her own hand at songwriting -
TV highlights
9 7 M o v i e: "The President's
Plane is Missing". Suspense
flick with Peter Graves, Ray-
mond Massey, and Rip Torn.
9 Harvest Festival. S p e c i a l
with Della Reese, Burl Ives,
and Oral Roberts.
56 Til the Butcher Cuts Him
Down. New Orleans jazz re-
called by singer-trumpeter
Kid "Punch" Miller.
9 56 Lightnin' Hopkins. Thirty
minutes of improvised music
and reminisces.
9:30 56 Freddie King. Blues guitar-
ist plays his hits.
10 9 Up Canada! Debut of inves-
tigative reporting program.
10:30 9 Some Honorable Members.
Canadlian House of commons
discussed.
11:30 2 Movie: Rod serling's "Sad-
die the Wind." Above-aver-
age western.
4 Johnny Carson. Guests: Kirk
Douglas, Joan Rivers

Leonard (Cohen) moves me
greatly. I find him very much of
a catalyst." She adds, however,
that the sources of her inspira-
tion are "an accumulation of
about everything I've heard and
seen and done."
And she's done quite a lot.
Her political involvement dates
back at least as far as 1964,
when she sang freedom songs in
Mississippi black voter regis-
tration drives.
That same summer she lost
custody of her son Clark after a
divorce from her high school
sweetheart, and she got her first
taste of consciousness-raising.
She writes in her Songbook:
"I was told that one of the
strongest objections they had to
giving me custody, besides the
fact that I lived in another state,
was my being in psychotherapy
. . . Rockland Coumty court in
Connecticut then, was also the
enemy of my growth as a wo-
man. They felt I did not deserve
to grow and to have my son at
the same time."
"I don't actively belong to any
particular k i n d of women's
group," Judy says now, "but I
h a v e consciousness - raising
friends - women with whom I
talk, work, and think."
They haven't changed her
thoughts on marriage, though.
"I've always felt the same to-
ward marriage," , Judy main-
tains, "My mother had a rotten
one . . . I had a rotten one. I
really question the motives be-
hind marriage - not to say that
I might not decide at some point
50 Movie: "Three on a Match."
Bette Davis stars in story of
tangled destinies of three
school pals.
12 9 Movie: "T 1h e Lieutenant
Wore Skirts." Amusing 1956
marital mix-up.
1:15 2 Movie: "They Were So
Young." Models arrive in Rio
and are trapped in sordid
racket.

music
that that was what I wanted,
but it has been through a lot of
thinking something I've chosen
not to do again."
Meanwhile, with an article
for Ms. magazine under her belt,
Judy is completing a film "about
a woman who is a conductor still
living" (Madam Brico?) Unwill-
ing to sacrifice its quality to
commercialism, Judy thinks the
film may make the rounds of col-
lege campuses, U. S. educational
television, and perhaps European
television.
A strongrclear voice landed
Judy work in drama some time
ago. Having played opposite
Stacy Keach in a N.Y.C. pro-
duction of Ibsen's Peer Gynt,
Judy reports, "It was one of the
most peaceful and contented
times of my life. I got to know
some beautiful people and learn-
ed a little about the theater."
May be that is why she ren-
ders Jacques Brel and Bertold
Brecht songs so powerfully in
concert, her huge eyes staring
right through the audience. No
wonder Stephen Stills entitled his
song to her "Suite Judy Blue
Eves."
She has been a musical suc-
cess be-ause she delivers her
songs not only as personal state-
ments - a kind of self-therapy,
but also for her audience's use;
she finds self-reassurance in
"Secret Gardens of the Heart,"
but she knows her listeners can
make use of the same senti-
ments.
It's not hokey when she says,
"Music and poetry can produce
a catharsis that involves every-
body. I try to make my audi-
ence feel their common human-
ity."
They certainly did Saturday
night as they joined together to
welcome Judy back for two en-
cores.
I76197~
It -- - -3
NOW SHOWING!
August 1972
THE OLYMPICS
8 directors capture
what the naked eye
cannot see

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS presents
A SHOWCASE PRODUCTION
THE MARRIAGE OF MR. MISSISSIPPI
by FRIEDRICH DURRENMATT
Thursday-Saturday, Oct. 25-27
Arena Theatre, Frieze Bldg.-8:OO PM.
TICKETS: $1.00 THURS.; $1.50 FRI. AND SAT.
ON SALE AT TRUEBLOOD BOX OFFICE
OCT. 23-27--12 NOON-5 P.M

Program Information 665-6290
603 E. LIBERTY
IT'S KAREN
BLACK, ROBERT
DUVALL, & JOE DON
BAKER VS.

Open 12:45
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9
NOT SHOWN WED., OCT, 24
DUE TO SPECIAL SILENT MOVIE
ORGAN CONCERT.

r.

Ooen 6:45 Shows ot 7 & 9

"A HILARIOUS MOVIE
proving that sex is funnier than
anything else"--Smith, Cosmopol-
itan
RATED R
p.m-Sat. & Sun. 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.

r

I

VISIONS
OF EIGHT
PLUS!
Endless Summer
VISIONS at 9:00
SUMMER at 7:15

Eastern Michigan University
HOMECOMING WEEKEND
EMU and WWWW Present
ARLO GUTHUIE
OCT. 27-8:00 P.M.
BOWEN FIELDHOUSE
TICKETS: $2.50, $3.50, $4.50
AVAILABLE AT: Ann Arbor Music Mart, JL. Hudson's,
Huckleberry Party Store, McKenny Union
CHICAGO
SOLD OUT

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY and WWWW
Present
Edgar Winter
SPECIAL GUEST: FOCUS
Oct. 30-8:00 P.M.e
Bowen Fieldhouse
$5 Advance
$5.50 at the Door
TICKETS ON SALE AT:
Ann Arbor Music Mart, J.L. Hudson's,
Huckleberry Party Store, McKenny Union

.------------------.--------

Il

Daily Photo by KEN FINK
Julian Bream

NEW WORLD FILM COOP presents *

HALLOWEEN MADNESS * *

wcbn
R9.5 k;:
ns eMorning show
9 Rock.
12 Progressive
3 Folk, Rock Progressive
6 News 'Sports
6:30 This Week in Sports
:30 Jazz "'Blues
11 Progressive

LEGAL ABORTIONS
$135
National Abortion Center
19009 W. 7 Mile Rd.
Detroit 255-3985
clinics in
Midwestern cities
Licensed Qualified Physicians

Douglas Fairbanks, Sr.
as "COKE" ENNYDAY
in

James Joyce's

b'

I

I

OPEN DAILY AT 12:45
SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
HELD OVER-3rd HIT WEEK
DON'T MiSS IT!
Rated G
~5C ~ ~ ?

FINNEGAN'S WAKE
Voted top trip film of the vear by Burbank art critics--F.W. has
left audiences dumbfounded wherever it has played. Recommended
for advanced Joyce or Vonnegut freaks or anyone seriously inter-
ested in exploring the 4th dimension of linguistic pluralities. (May
be too intense for young children).

"INTERNATIONAL.
HOUSE"
feoaiures fabulous Cab Calloway

-ALSO-
Ile.. .. t . -.a

I

(' '

pa Ap

f - < I_

II

I

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