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October 23, 1973 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-23

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Tuesday, October 23, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pni tm Tk roj

I

rage i nree

'

Cox

firing

halts

non-Wal

WASHINGTON (IP) - Presi-
dent Nixon's firing of Archibald
Cox blocked, at least temporar-
ily the search for White House
records that could prove vital
to non-Watergate investigations
including the ITT and milk-price
cases.
Dissolution of the special pro-
secutor's office also leaves an
uncertain future for probes into
a $100,000 contribution from bil-
lionaire Howard Hughes to Nix-
on's friend C. G. "Bebe" Re-
bozo, illegal corporate donations
to the President's re-election
campaign and alleged presiden-
tial involvement in the 1971 Ells-
berg burglary.
WHITE H 0 U S E spokesman
Ronald L. Zielger has promised
that the Justice Department will
carry out these investigations
"with thoroughness and vigor"
despite the sacking of Cox and
departure of the department's
two top officials.
Documents already disclosed
by the Senate Watergate commit-
tee and other sources point to
critical material apparently still
locked in the basement of the
Executive Office Building.
But the conditions Nixon set
when he agreed to release some
material from the Watergate
tape recordings could cut off ac-
cess to all White House Water-
gate and non-Watergate papers.
The court order he has refused
to comply with would have forc-
ed him to surrender documents
as well as the more celebrated
tapes.

ergate
tial conversations." In return
for the tape summary, he said,
"it would, be understood that
there would be no further at-
tempt by the special prosecutor
to subpoena still more tapes or
other presidential papers of a
similar nature."
Cox said one of his chief rea-
sons for rejecting the deal was
the ban on further document-
hunting. Some of the papers he is
known or believed to have wanted
are:
-ITT: In a memorandum from
Charles Colson to H. R. Halde-
man on March 30, 1972, Colson
listed a series of memos he said
could be damaging if they were
discovered.
One from John Ehrlichman to
John Mitchell on May 5, 1971,al-
luded to discussions with the
President as to the "agreed upon
ends" in the resolution of the In-
ternational Telephone & Tele-
graph Corp. antitrust case, Col-
son said. Another went diectly to
the President.
HE SAID this memo would
show that the Justice Depart-
ment knew ITT planned to give
money to the Republican National
Convention before the depart-
ment settled its antitrust case
against the giant conglomerate.
-MILK FUND: The milk pro-
ducers lobby sent Nixon a letter
on Dec. 16, 1971, discussing the
industry's problems with price
controls and mentioning it was
about to start contributing $2 mil-
lion to the President's re-election
campaign, according to investi-
gative sources.
Three months later, on March
23, 1971, Nixon met personally at
the White House with more than
a dozen dairy industry lobbyists.
Also present was the then-secre-
tary of agriculture, Clifford Har-
din. Two days after the meeting
Hardin reversed an earlier deci-
sion andannounced an increase
in federal milk price supports of

_._._ _
r r-

- -

27 cases
27 cents a hundredweight, esti-
mated to be worth as much as
$700 million in added income to
d'airymen.
A DAY before the White House
meeting, secret contributions be-
gan to flow into a flock of dum-
my campaign committees and
from there into the Nixon cam-
paign. A total of $422,500 was
eventually contributed by three
dairy co-operatives.
UilE MICHIGAN DAILY
Vol. LXXXIV, No. 41
Tuesday, October 23, 1973
is edited and managed by students atI
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
durin the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus'
area );.$650 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).
rf

NASSAU
MASS
MEET!ING

MARKLEY HALL:
Lounge 4
Tues., Oct. 23

ti 1

UNION: Assembly Hall
Wednesday, Oct. 24
7:00 P.M.
FREE FILM & FUN
BOTH NITES!!!
Call U.A.C. Travel for details

j'

-2

i MUSKET
Gypsy and an Original Musical
CENTRAL COMMITTEE
APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED
OCT. 23-OCT. 30
Peck up applications 2nd floor Union
in\ UAC office
$( FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL 763-1 107

0

I

Order

I

TICKETS NOW ON SALE !

.

Your
Subscription

A MAN WEARING a Nixon mas

I

White House yesterday, waving
President's impeachment.

AP Photo NIXON DIRECTED Cox "to
k and striped pajamas stands with a group of protesters outside the make no further attempts by ju-
his sign at passing cars and encouraging them to honk for the dicial process to obtain tapes,
notes or memoranda of presiden-

Today

iHE NEW PHOENIX"
REPERTORY W COaMNY
T. EdwardHombietonMichaelMonteI.Monoging Directors-HroldPrince.StephenPorter;ArticDirectors

WORLD FAMOUS MUSICIAN:

Cellis
SAN JUAN (Reuter) - Cellist
Pablo Casals, hailed as one of
this century's greatest musicians,
died yesterday after a brief ill-
ness. He was 96.
His 36-year-old wife, Martita,
was at his side when he diedl
at 2:05 p.m.
THE WORLD-renowned musi,:
ian had been in th'e hospital since
his heart attack last Tuesday and
spent the week in a "highly crit-
ical" condition, rallied during
the weekend and finally succumb-
ed today of lung and heart corn-
plications.
Ms. Casals said the body would
be taken to their home anJ only
members of Casals' family and
close personal friends would be
permitted to enter the house dur-
ing the mourning period.
Casals, whose full name w a s
Pau -(he- preferred this Catalan
version of Pablo) Carlos Salva-
dor DeFillb De Casals, was born
in the Catalan village of Ven-
drell on Dec. 29, 1876, the second
of 11 children of the local or-
ganist, Carlos Casals.
HE LEARNED at a very early
age to play the piano, violin,
organ, and to compose. He heard
a cello for the first time when he
was 11 and declared at once that
this was the instrument he wish-
ed to play.
Soon ofter that his mother Pilar

Pablo

Casals dies

took him to Barcelona and enter-
ed him at the Municipal School
of Music where he was to study
for five years, supporting him-
self by playing in a cafe.
He studied in Madrid and Brus-
sels then went to Paris where
he played cello in music halls
to eke out a precarious living,
supporting his mother and two
small brothers who accompanied
him on his travels.
HE RETURNED to Barcelona,
teaching and playing at the Bar-
celona opera. Casals gave con-
certs, made his Paris debut as a
soloist with the Charles Lamour-
eux Orchestra in 1899, andesoon
found, himself in demand in Eur-
ope and America.
When the Spanish Civil War
broke out Casals put his talent at
the service of the Republicans
and after the victory of the
Franco regime he went into self-
imposed exile, first in France,
and later in Puerto Rico, h i s
mothers home.
In December, 1966, when Cas-
als celebrated his 90th birthday,
distinguished musicians and oth-
ers visited him in San Juan.
They were surprised at the vig-
our of a man who had learned
to play the piano at four years
of age, the violin at seven! and
the organ at nine.
CASALS, who almost to his
death began each day by play-
ing two Bach preludes and

fugues on the piano before taking
a stroll on the beach, used to
say that from his earliest years
music was "as natural as breath-
ing."
Along with a lifelong love of
music Casals had conducted a
personal world peace crusade
since 1962.
"I am a man first, an artist
second," he said in a book about

I

I

I

r

EMU Maj"or Events Committee

with WWWW

presents

AMERICA

i

November 9

Bowen Fieldhouse

Tickets: $3; $4, $5-reserved

AVAILABLE AT: Ann Arbor Music Mart,
Huckleberry Pa rt y Store, J.L. Hudson's.
McKenny Union.

r

NO

ALFRED HITCHCOCK
BLACKMAIL
HITCHCOCK has the knack of putting ordi-
nary people into complex situations and then
letting them make their own way out of the
maze. This 1929 film, his first talkie, is no
exception
SHORT: ZAGREB BITS II
WED.: OUR DAILY BREAD
ARCHITECTURE AUD.
CINEMA GUILD Tonight at 7
and 9:05 Adm. $1

ISRAEL
needs you

0

Samuel Beckett's
* evening, an a for
half-tramp, half-cl
* who has, they bel
at the rendezvous
Godot's gratitude
* whether they have
* v

- - - w w ___ .-.____ . - - - - - --'___. _ ..m..__ __._.__.

xx. c c. c.Y

NEW WORLD FILM COOP presents
AMUEL BECKETT'S
TING FOR GODOT

-

'T

second work filmed from the stage play. One
nely country road near a tree, two elderly men,
lown, are waiting for someone of the name Godot
leve, given them to understand that their patience
will be rewarded. The two are not sure what form
will take, anymore than they know for certain
e come to the right place on the appointed day.

'TT
'
.'
"k
9'

BENEFIT CONCERT
This Ann Arbor community is invited to attend a
benefit concert. All proceeds are earmarked for
non - military essential services for the state of
Israel.
LOUIS NAGEL, pianist
B.S., M.S., Ph.D. The Juilliard School
member, piano faculty, University of Michigan School of Music .
JULIE NAGEL, assisting artist
B.S., M.S. The Juilliard School
Michigan League Ballroom
October 24, 1973-8:00 P.m.
NAMEI
ADDRESS -___ _
TICKETS TOTAL .
I at $2.25 (buys 2 sterilized dressings)I

:1

-' '"

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