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October 17, 1973 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1973-10-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, October 17, 1971

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

10% OFF

Kissinger, Tho win
Nobel peace prize
(Continued from Page 1) However, Tho was so shaped by
HE INDICATED to reporter his background of guerrilla fight-
Oriana Fallaci that pacifists "will ing, imprisonment and the long po-
be crushed by the will of those litical struggle for leadership in
that are strong." Hanoi that it was unlikely Kissing-
Kissinger ,also gave an insight er would ever accept him as a
into the militant background of Le friend.
Duc Tho. "He's a man who has This assessment was underlined
never known tranquility," Kissing- by Kissinger who said of Tho, "I
er said. "Where we fight in order didn't convert him to our point of
to end the war he fights in order view."
to achieve certain objectives he's ACCORDING to Kissinger, "we
held all his life." used to joke with each other that
All through the years of private after the peace we would exchange
talks Kissinger and Le Duc Tho professorships, he at Harvard and
never made a public, personal at- I at Hanoi."
tack on each other. Vituperative All of this added up to a pro-
exchanges took place between the fessional relationship based more
United States and North Vietnam, on respect than on personal feel-
but the two men were always on a ings. Kissinger said, "I found in
government - against - governmentinsKsigesad"Ifudn
basis' him a man deeply dedicated to his
KISSINGER said in looking back cause, very serious, very strong
and always courteous, well-bred."
over tjie negotiations that "we es-I
tablished a certain personal rela- In brief remarks to reporters yes-
tionship, sometimes humorous." terday Kissinger appeared to soft-
-- - ------- ---- en his assessment of Tho when he
referred to his former adversary
as "an old colleague in the search
RE LB for peace.
a nU / nnin -®

Mideast conflict: A
reporter's notebook

M Class Ring
J.L. Small Co.
Prestige Lines Inc.
1209 So. Univ.
663-7398

(Continued from Page 1)
what will this one be called?
Israeli soldiers in the field are
fond of firing this question at news-
men, especially TV crews, visit-
ing their units.
The 1948 war with the Arabs be-
came known as "The War of Inde-'
pendence." The 1956 war became
the "Suez War." In 1967, there was
"the Six Day.War."
The sporadic fighting across the'
Suez Canal in 1969-70 became
known as "the War of Attrition."
Israeli Chief of Staff David Ela-
bar called the new outbreak of
fighting the "War of the Day of
Judgment," a bilingual play on
words combining the Yom Kippur
holiday, when the war started, with
a warning of impending doom for
the Arabs.
A favorite game among Israeli
reservists is trying to name the
war. One antiaircraft company in
the Sinai is offering "a, two-week
vacation in Cairo" for the winning
name.
THE TOP BUTTON missing onI
a sergeant's shirt is a shock in any
man's army, but in Israel it's
enough to drive a tanker off his
tract. The sergeant is apt to be a
"chen," one of Israel's female
soldiers who are known for their
physical fitness and ability to pack
a blouse beyond military specifica-
"My name is Frieda," volunteer-
ed a fit three-striper. "Please do
not ask me how the boys keep their
minds with the girls around be-

for the fighting farces.
"And if they help the
doesn't hurt," explained.
a press escort officer.

morale it
Lt. Alex,

cause now everyone keeps their
mind only on the war."
A truckload of paratroopers went
by and, like she said, all eyes were
dutifully on the war, especially
those making a detailed study of
behavior patterns in the noncom-
missioned ranks.
The women's militia means type-
writers, telephones, radar scopes,
field kitchens and hospital wards

ALL
YOU CANC
EAT

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Mounds of Spaghetti, Coleslaw, Garlic Bread
EVERY WEDNESDAY 4:30-10 P.M.
HURON HOTEL & LOUNGE
124 Pearl-483-1771-(Ypsi.)

ABORTION SERVICE
Clinic in Mich.-1 to 24 week
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CALL COLLECT
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Centicore
336 Maynard 1229 S. Univ.
TOLKIEN TRILOGY
In Paperback Now Sells for
$1.25/Vol. CENTICORE STILL
SELLS THEM FOR 95c. Come
Quick. Supply ,imited.

THE AVERAGE I.Q. of the Is-
raeli reservist called to action sel-
dom fails to impress the visitor.
During an Egyptian air raid on
Israeli positions 30 miles from the
Suez Canal a few days ago, this
reporter shared a bunker - really
the garbage ditch - with an ar-
chitect, a jurist, a bank officer and
a bookkeeper, all assigned to a
medium tank platoon.
Under the impetus of the archi-
tect,the 40iminutes between the
warning siren and all clear were
spent in spirited discussion of the
glories and failures of Israeli ur-
ban planners in building new set-
tlements fdr the constant flow of
immigrants.
It wasn't until several hours la-
ter, when the unit was ordered to
move out toward -the canal, that it
became apparent the bookkeeper
was the commanding officer.
"Why not?" the architect ans-
wered the question with another
question, as is the Israeli way.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, No. 36
Wednesday, October 17, 1973
is edited and managed by students at
teUniversity of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscriptionrates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subacrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area): $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail (other
jstates and foreign).
II

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OPDI LY 12. II 2330.1*:WSNNGON YS1A

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POSITIONS NOW OPEN FOR 1
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ALL-CAMPUS SUPREME COURT

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WHO CAN APPLY?
Any student of the university.
WHERE TO APPLY?
Room 3-X Michigan Union
WHEN TO APPLY?
Before Monday, Oct. 22, 1973, 3 p.m.
HOW TO APPLY?
Just fill out a csi prospective candidates
sign up for an interview.

I

People! Music! Food!
BACH CLUB,
PRESENTS
Baroque, Classical &
Contemporary Music by
LECLAIR, REICHA,
PERSICHETTI, & ARNOLD
PERFORMED BY
Vincent BRYSON--flute
Scott KNIPE-oboe
Ruth VANDERMOLEN-
clarinet
Vicki KING-bassoon
Bob EVENDEN-horn
Thurs., Oct. 18, 8 p.m.
E. Quad Greene 'Lounge-
EVERYONE INVITED
No musical knowledge needed
ADMISSION: 50c
Classic, but ever contemporary
APPLE DUMPLINGS
with cinnamon sauce
served afterward.
further info:
761-0102 or 665-6165

form and

WHAT IS NEEDED?
Clear logical thought is the only requirement.

PRESENTIlNG:
THE PREMIERE
PERFORMANCE OF
BRAIDED THEATRE
"Travel in Time and Space"
DANCE DRAMA MUSIC
. POWER CENTER FOR
THE PERFORMING ARTS
Ann Arbor, Mich.-8:00 p.m.
OCT. 21, 1973-$1.50 admission
Tickets available at Michigan
Union, Discount Records and door

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VOLUNTEERS NEEDED BY
KIBBUTZIM IN ISRAEL
(it's harvest time now!)
" Minimum commitment: one month.
0 Also, six month program through 5herut La'am.

WALLABEE
Mrcw s / f jZ f

OCTOBER 18th between 11 & 4

CARMEN ROSATO, THE "MAN FROM M I N 0 LT

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Volunteers must pay round trip transportation
from New York ($407 for those under 24)
For further information, call Hillel
1429 Hill, 663-4129 or 663-1337

SPEC AL
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kLE ENDS SATURDAY, OCT. 20

1973-'74 Graduates:
October 30,31
is the time
to talk to us
about futures.
Yours.
And ours.
At Atlantic Richfield, our concern is how to respond to the need for
energy in creative new ways that make maximum use of our nation's
resources with minimum disruption to our nation's environment.
It's a big order. It's also a big opportunity... opening up exciting new
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For you, the opportunity is immediate. You'll learn by doing on
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you show us you can handle them.
We have openings in many locations throughout the U.S. To determine
if your background and our requirements match, please see your
Plracmnt nirector renrdina an annointment with our camous

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