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October 16, 1973 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-16

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Tuesday,. October. 16; -1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.' Page Three

TuesayOctber16, 973THEMICIGANDAIY Pge hre

Fire destroys Mass.

city,
CHELSEA, Mass. () - More
than. 1,000 homeless persons
sought food, something to wear
and a place to stay yesterday at
National Guardsmen patrolled the
smoldering ruins of 18 blocks of
this industrial satellite of Bos-
ton.
An estimated,20 per cent of the
city of 32,000 were evacuated
from their homes in the Sunday
night inferno that affected an.es-
timated 900 buildings.
IN SOME BLOCKS not a build-

,000 homeless

ing was left standing; except for
jagged pieces *of wall.
Fueled by high, gusting winds,
the fire leveled the vast area of
tenements, warehouses and fac-
tories, turning the rundown sec-
tion that sits across the Mystic
River from Boston into waste-
land.
Mayor Philip Spelman said 100
homes and apartments were de-
stroyed and others were badly
damaged. He said more than
1,000 persons in 200 familiest re
homeless. Fire officials estimat-

Johnson suspected
wiretap1ing-Douoias

ed that 280 living structures and
another 520 industrial or commer-
cial buildings were destroyed or
damaged.
THE RED CROSS appealed for
listings of vacant homes and Gov.
Francis W. Sargent asked Presi-
dent Nixon. to declare the city a
disaster area.
More than 2,000 firemen from
85 communities, some as far
away as New Hampshire and
Rhode Island, fought the blaze at
its height. Twenty firemen were
treated for smoke inhalation;
tfour were hospitalized.
The fire, according to Fire
C h i e f Fothergill, apparently
started in a three-story wooden
warehotse. He said he had no
evidence of arson and the exact
cause was not known.
IN FEBRUARY, the National
Board of Fire Underwriters de-
scribed Chelsea as having "the
highest potential for conflagra-
tion of any city in the United
States" because of some 138 mil-
lion gallons of gasoline and other
flammable liquids stored above
ground. Those were not involved
Sunday.
No estimate of damage was
possible except "in the millions,'"
according to Fothergill.

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Harkening back to his days as a 'U' football player, Vice President designate Gerald Ford holds the
football presented to him by a Republican group yesterday during a stop in Portland, Oregon while
touring several western states.
VIOLENCE IN BANGKOK:
hai st uents riot; force

military
By TREVOR GOODCHILD
BANGKOK, (Reuter) - Form-
er Prime Minister Thanom Kit-
tikachorn, whose military-led
government resigned Sunday in
the face of fierce student riots in
Bangkok, has left Thailand for
the sake of order in the country,
it was announced yesterday.
A brief statement broadcast by
-Radio Thailand said he left with
former Deputy Prime Minister
Praphas Charusathien and Col.
Narong Kittikachorn, Field Mar-
shal Thanom's son.
THEIR DEPARTURE FOL-
LOWED two days of violent stu-
dent demonstrations and bloody
streets clashes in which many
were killed and h udreds injured.
Rioters set fire Jo government
buildings and today gutted the
metropolitan police headquarters
here.
Tens of thousands of student
defying t h e security forces
still swarmed in the streets-
of the capital tonight as the an-
nouncement of Marshal Thanoms

govt. t
departure came.
HIS DESTINATION a b r o a d
was not immediately known, but
one western diplomatic source
said later the three men had left
for Japan.
Field Marshal Thanom, Prime
Minister since 1969, led the mili-
tary in 1971 in abolishing the con-
stitution in favor of rule by de-
cree.
A cornerstone of the students
demands is a return to democra-
tic rule in the country.
K I N G B H U M I B O L
ADULYADEJ last night named
Sanya Thammasak, a 66-year-
old university rector, to succeed,
Marshal Thanom as premier.
But demonstrating students re-
fused to leave the streets while
Thanom remained supreme com-
mander of the armed forces.
The announcement of the form-
er Premiers departure came
shortly after the Supreme Mili-
tary Command warned rioters
against further violence and

o resign
threatened strict enforcement to-
night of a seven - hour curfew
ignored by demonstrators last
night.
DIPLOMATIC S O U R C E S
said the students had issued a
memordandum to Sanya demand-
ing that Marshal Thanom, who
still remains supreme command-
er of the armed forces and thus
fields powerful control over gov-
ernment, be stripped of all mili-
tary powers.
With government offices order-
ed to be closed for three days
and the city in confusion, no ex-
act figure of the casualties in
the rioting was available today.
One medical source said not more
than 100 died in yesterdays street
fighting, but press reports spoke
of between 300 and 400 killed.
Demonstrators later drifted
away from the central govern-
ment area in large numbers at
the request of their leaders who
drove around with megaphones
saying that troops were expected
to arrive at any minute.

By AP and Reuter
WASHINGTON - The late
President Lyndon Johnson con-
fided during his White House
tenure that he believed "that
even his phone was tapped," Su-
preme Court Justice William
Douglas said yesterday.
Douglas, in an attack on what
he called the "dirty business" of
wiretapping, also saidshe was
"morally certain" that the Su-
preme Court's conference room
was bugged. The most secret
deliberations of the justices on
pending cases take place in the
room.
?DOUGLAS' ASSERTION came
in a dissent to a court action in
a wiretap-related case.
"We who live in the District
of Columbia know that electronic
surveillance is commonplace,"
wrote Douglas.
"I am indeed morally certain
that the conference room has
been 'bugged' and President
Johnson during his term in the
White House asserted to me that
even his phone was tapped."
BY THE GOVERNMENT'S
own statistics, Douglas said,
more than 500,000 conversations
a year are overheard by govern-
ment agents acting on court-is-
sued warrants.
Douglas gave no additional in-
formation and his office respond-
ed to inquiries by saying there
would be no more comment.
Other members of the court, at
least initially, gave no indication

they shared Douglas' fears about
the confrence room.
IN OTHER ACTIONS yester-
day, the court agreed to decide:
-Whether the U. S. Circuit
Court in New York erred in a
ruling on the scope of class ac-
tion suits, the vehicle by which
individuals may sue on behalf of
all in similar circumstances. At
stake, claim critics of the lower
court ruling, is the future of such
mass legal actions for consumer
and environmental protection;
-Whether Montgomery, Ala.,
may permit segregated private
schools to use public stadiums
under a policy that a group of
blacks from the city says under-
mines school desegregation;
-Whether Missouri goes too
far in protecting separation of
church and state when it denies
the services of federally financed
teachers to poor children in non-
public schools; and,
-Whether local governments
may exercise their police power
to ban communal living by unre-
lated persons in the interest of
promoting the traditional family
through zoning laws.
DOUGLAS' IRE on wiretapping
was raised by the court's refus-
al to grant bail pending appeal in
a federal contempt of court case
in which Margaret Heustche re-
fused to answer questions from a
grand jury about a series of
break-ins in 1972 at draft board
offices in Evanston, Ill.

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