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October 10, 1973 - Image 5

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Michigan Daily, 1973-10-10

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Wednesday, October 10, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Wen. aOcoe ,1-7 H ICIA AL

-aae Five

Saindor
By ROY CHERNUS No qi
There are few enough musical raised &
events anywhere which warrant ity ont
the description "historical." This valeso
Friday's lecture on 20th century ter 30 yE
composer Bela, Bartok by his son of the m
and subsequent recital of some juiices
of Bartok's works as part of a Bartok
piano concert by UM piano pro- ed cons
fessor Gyorgy Sandor promises musical
to be such an event. and em

illuminates

Bartok 's

Jestion could possibly be
as to Bartok Jr.'s author-
the human and personal
of his father's work af-
ears' intimate knowledge
man. And no musical pre-'
will be espoused, f o r
Jr. is a successful retir-
truction engineer with no
but profound spiritual
notional affinity for the

Bartok legacy.
In Gyorgy Sandor we have a
rare musical contact with Bac-
tok as well as a seasoned con-
cert artist in his own right. His
numerous recordings encompass
a diverse selection of piano mu-
sic, although his crowning
achievements are definitive ren-
ditions of Bartok's and Proko-
fiev's complete solo piano works.
I recently spoke with Sandor
about his lifelong friend, musi-
cal mentor, and Hungarian com-
patriot, Bela Bartok. As he re-
counted much of twentieth cen-
tury musical history in Bartok's
tragic life, Sandor's normal pois-
ed manner became animated and
expressive - as if he were re-
lating today's events.
Sandor stumbled upon Bartok
in Budapest in 1931 by pure ac-
cident while waiting to begin
studies with Erno Dohnanyi. As

Sandor puts it, "I never went
near Dohnanyi again," after his
first lessons with Bartok which
continued for four years.
Bartok considered Sandor his
foremost interpreter, for he en-
trusted premieres of the Dance
Suite (1945) and the Piano Con-
certo No. 3 (1946) to Sandor.
Bartok's masterpieces were vio-
lently rejected during his life-
time by all -but a few experts like
Serge Koussevitsky. C r i t i c
Virgil Thomson described t h e
Third Piano Concerto as a work
which "may perhaps last one or
two seasons." But the misunder-
standing of Bartok's works ran
far deeper than this. In America
he was accused of writing totally
inaccessible, ugly music while in
other countries like Australia he
was seen as selling out and con-
forming to popular American
musical tastes purely for money!
Nothing could be further from

the truth for Bartok died in 1945
penniless after long bouts of ill-
ness.
The wartime United States sim-
ply couldn't absorb so much new
music from immigrant compos-
ers like Hindemith, Schoenberg,
and Stravinsky. Neither could the
public fathom Bartok's pushing
music to its tonal limits through
the free use of all twelve tones
around harmonic centers.
Sandor asserted, "Bartok's mu-
sic was never atonal although he
was well aware of those devel-
opments in Europe (e.g., Schoen-
berg). Bartok always chose his
notes carefully, not using t h e
random selections of the atonal
idiom."
"The presence of some sort of
tonal center or gravity is essen-
tial no matter how obscured it
may be. Tension, relaxation, a
sense of progression can only be
produced in music through de-

music
parture and returning to t h e
tonal center. The atonal idiom is
losing popularity at this time.
You can't express much in it."
Bartok's extensive use of au-
thentic central European and
Turkish folk music in modes dif-
ferent from Western major-min-
or scales added to the unique,
exotic sound of his music.
What Sandor emphasized, how-
ever, was that Bartok's vital,
dynamic musical essence wasn't
in the obviously innovative com-
plex peasant dance rhythms and
structures he derived; but ra-
ther in the "conventional" pas-
sages.
Bartok brought a vital plastic-
ity to the interpretation of all
music, making it breathe with
proper emphasis and longer time
on the more important notes. He
endowed music with as much
freedom as he wished for Hun-
gary itself.

ARTS

"AJOY! STUNNING! BEAUTIFUL!"
-N Y TIMES -SATURDAY REVIEW -PLAYBOY
PARAMOUNT PICTI RF.S Prtte.
A INE Fitt
Fk4,CO ZEFFIRELLI .
ROMEO
'JULIET TECHNICOLOR
BACK TO THRILL YOU AGAIN!
Open Daily at 12:45
Shows at 1 p.m.-3:30-6:10-8:45
COMING-James Coburn is
"HARRY IN YOUR POCKET"
SYMPHON IE PASTORALE
Jean DELANNOY adapts Andre GIDE'S novella,
SYMPHONIE PASTORALE, with considerable faith-
fulness to the story of a minister who adopts a
blind orphan girl. By refusing to recognize his emo-
tions about her, the minister creates tragedy for his
wife, son and the girl.
Short: "Queen Victoria in Ireland"
THURS.: BERGMAN'S THE MAGNICIAN
ARCHITECTURE AUD.
CINEMA GUILD Tonihtat
and 9:05 Adm, $1
OCT. 12-27
"FOLLOWING
an exhibition of drawings and images by
DONALD DAVIDSON
1971 M.F.A. graduate from UM
OPENING RECEPTION FRIDAY EVENING
OCT. 12-7-10 P.M.
UNION GALLERY
1ST FLOOR, MICHIGAN UNION
GALLERY HOURS: Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
aO i> C>assfi>eds> > esOuo< ->o< tso-
Daily CMassif ieds Get Results

Bonaparte s Retreat
to offer olk music

By BOB SEIDENSTEIN
Bonaparte's Retreat is not on-
ly the title of a fine old-time fid-
dle tune, but is also the name
of a new coffeehouse in Ann Ar-
bor which will emphasize tradi-
tional folk music.
"We hope to stimulate interest
in a different type of music,"
says Dick Tarrier, who, along
with Martha Burns and Jack
Werner, is organizing the ven-
ture.
The coffeehouse is set to open
this Saturday at 8:30. It will re-
side at the Guild House, 802 E.
Monroe, every Saturday night.
Banjoist Dan Gellert, of Elk-
hart, Indiana, will perform this
week. Gellert recently played at

the National Folk Festival near
Washington. He is a former win-
ner of the Philadelphia Folk Fes-
tival banjo contest.
Upcdming musicians include
the Oakridge Ramblers, who
play Irish and New England
dance tunes, and J. P. Jenks of
Kalamazoo, possibly the only
banjoist in the world who in-
cludes' the Swan Lake ballet in
his repertoire. Even a barber-
shop quartet may be in the off-
ing.
The performers, generally, will
be people who have played pro-
fessionally on occasion, but do
not try to "make their living that
way," says Tarrier.:
The music will be mostly "old

and non-commercial:
learned in an oral sort
says organizer Burns.

the kind
of way,"

CUTL(URE CA-\LEW-\R
UPCOMING CONCERT TIP-Arlo Guthrie will perform at
EMU Saturday Oct. 27 at Bowen Fieldhouse.
DRAMA-U-Players present Shaw's "St. Joan" in Power Cen-
ter at 8 tonight.
FILM-Cinema Guild presents Delannay's Symphonie Pass-
torale in Arch. Aud. at 7, 9:05 tonight. A. A. Film Co-op
is showing Cukor's My Fair Lady in 'Aud. A, Angell at
6:30, 9:30 tonight. Art Film Series B - Monet and Seurat,
Aud. 3, MLB, tonight at 7, 9.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC-Dady Mehta, Piano, SM Recital Hall at
8 tonight

Tarrier maintained that Bona-
parte's Retreat wasnot in coi-
petition with the established Ark
coffeehouse. He claimsthat fi-
nancial considerations are forc-
ing the Ark to feature more well-
known performers and less tra-
ditional music.
'Linda Siglin of the Ark wel-
comed the new coffeehouse ex-
clairing, "The more music the
better!" She said that the Ark
was presenting both traditional
and contemporary folk music,
and that financial pressures are
just causing the Ark to present
"more" music.
Bonaparte's Retreat will oper-
ate in a low-keyed atmosphere
with free coffee and "lots of rai-
sins." Local folk musicians are
invited to bring their instruments
for "afterhours" get togethers
following the shows.
$.
&i f$2.00 a

Daily Photo by KEN FINK

Cyorgy Sandor

50 Movie-Adventure
"Captain Horatio Hornblower."
(1951)
12:00 9 Movie
"A Time for Killing." (1967)
1:00 2 Movie-Western
"Dakota Incident." (1956)
4 7 News
2:30} Mayberry R.F.LI.
300 2 Nw
wcb

WCBN-FM
News at 7:50. 8:50, 9:50, 10:50 etc.
"News at Six": a 30 minute news,'
weather and sports program with Greg
Bowman and Paul Francuch.

I
3
r
f
I
f
f

_.
e

tonight
6:00. 2 4 7 News
50 Gilligan's Island
56 Carrascolendas
6:30 2 CBS News-Walter Cronkite
4 NBC News-John Chancellor
7 ABC News-Smith/Reasoner
'9 I Dream of Jeanne-Comedy
50 Hogan's Heroes-Comedy
56 Collector's Corner
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell theTruth
Beverly Hillbillies
50 Night Gallery
56 Vince Lombardi Science and
Art of Football-Instruction
7:30 2 What's My Line?'
4 Sale of the Century
7 Wait Till Your Father Gets
Home
9 Bewitched
50 Pro Hockey
56 Jean Shepherd's America
8:00 2 Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour
4 Adam-12
7 Bob and Carol and Ted and
Alice
9 Jan Tyson
56 Essene
8:30 4 Tenafly
7 Movie
"Don't Be Afraid of the Dark."
9 Target the Impossible
9:00 2 Cannon
9 News-David Compton
9:30 Kopykats
56 Common Ground
10:00 2 Dan August
4 Love Story
7 Doc Elliott
50 Perry Mason
56 To Be Announced
10:30 Dollars and Sense
11:00 2 4 7 News.
9 CBC News-Lloyd Robertson
50 One Step Beyond
11:30 2 Movie
"Mongo's Back in Town" (1971)
4 Johnny Carson
SMoving Targets
9 News
20 Camp Meeting Hrour-Religion

(:00
9:00
12:00
3:00
6:00
6:30
7:30
11:00
3:00

Dior nirlg show
Rock
Progressive
Folk/Rock/Progressive
News/Sports/Comment
Talkback
Jazz/Blues
Progressive
Signoff

WRCN-AM
News on the hour beginning at 7:30
Sm. Campus Information News at odd
hours-7 :30, 9:30, 11:30, 1:30 pm, 3:30
etc. ABC Entertainment News at even
hours-8:30, 10:30, 12:30, 2:30, etc.

oma 1

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OPEN DAILY AT 12:45
SHOWS AT1,3,5,7 9PM
DON T MISS IT'
Rated G
ANORMAN JEWhNJ fiumY
"JESUS CHRIST
SUPERSTAR" j

APPEARING IN A FUND RAISING CONCERT FOR
OZONE, HOUSE'* DRUG HELP
COMMUITY TR, POJE>
_:
photo D..Fult'
photo D. Fulton
r : J..: WEr LLS...r r.x, & : BUDDY GUY - : .. }: s< i";;: :
". :::::. :::::.::}::., '}' i :n.: :::::::. ::: : ' "{ :::::F.-' "r. : }r:i ~~YY"....'.::: :""i?
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The University of Michigan
Professional Theatre Program
announces
3Distinguished Repertory Companies
THE NEW PHOENIX
REPERTORY -COMPANY
presntig Fydeau's "wondeflly iv uinv l arce"
ctober 25-27
anU kurracenmatII S wr omea(
TifF VISI
October 27-25
the prcmicrc engagement o(
THE SHAVFESTIVAL
THEATRE OF CANADA
in( B. Shav's warm and witty"
December 6--9
THE NEW YORK CITY
CENTER ACTING COMPANY
presenIting ,John (iay ' .ong-i Icd satire"
February 14-16
an Shake 's co edyeat"ccn I sua -tlit
Mf A . fanj

I

I

EMU Major Events Committee
PRESENTS:
SHA-N VA- A
October 13
D _A N ___-i - IJ 11 -- - _

® --- ® 1

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