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October 10, 1973 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1973-10-10

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W, 4nesday, October 10, 1973

I HE M1CH1taAN DAILY

Page - hree

WecI'nesday, October 10, 1973 Ii-IEMICHI(,AN DAILY

Watergate

panel

I I
..
..

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 4:10
October 9 & 140
The Department of Speech Communication
and Theatre Student Laboratory Theatre
PRESENTS
COP-OUT j

p.m.

investigates
Howard Hughes

by JOHN GUARE

licensed qualified
physicians

ZOO STORY

by EDWARD ALBEE
ARENA THEATRE, Frieze Building
ADMISSION FREE

AP Photo
The medium is the message
"My art is temporary and nobody can buy it," says Boston sidewalk painter Robert Guillemin of his
unique art form. Known locally as "Sidewalk Sam," Guillemin restricts himself to reproductions of old
masters. With chalk in hand and dented bucket nearby, to collect donations, the "street artist" in this
picture puts the finishing touches on a Gilbert Stuart portrait of George Washington.
URGES LESS MID-EAST DEPENDENCE:
Nixon appeals to Americans
to conserve fuel supplies

WASHINGTON () - The Sen-
ate Watergate committee is in-
vestigating an allegation that
billionaire Howard Hughes got a
favorable Nixon administration
antitrust ruling after Hughes
allegedly gave $100,000 in cash
to presidential confidante Charles
"Bebe" Rebozo, sources said
yesterday.
Sen. Lowell Weicker (R-Conn.),
told newsmen that "the matter
has been raised in committee"
and he would like to hear testi-
mony from Hughes and Rebozo,
a long-time friend of President
Nixon.
WEICKER gave no further de-
tails.
In yesterday's public hearings,
the committee heard former Nix-
on campaign spy John Buckly
testify that he photographed box-
loads of intercepted papers from
the presidential campaign head-
quarters of Sen. Edmund Mus-
kie (D-Me.). He said he passed
the photographs on to other Nix-
on campaign agents.
Buckley, known to Nixon cam-
paign operatives as "Fat Jack,"
said such spying is legal and
commonplace in American poli-
tics. But he was challenged on
that by both Democrats and Re-
publicans on the committee.
Buckley, 53, testified involuntar-
ily under a grant of immunity.
WEICKER would not comment
on what evidence the committee
has gathered about the alleged
Hughes - Rebozo affair.
A former Hughes aide, Robert
Maheu, has testified in a law-
suit that Rebozo was given $100,-
000 in two cash installments in
!1969 and 1970. The money hasn't
been reported as a campaign
contribution, although Maheu
said it was intended as such.
The committee's chief counsel,
Samuel Dash, refused to com-
ment on the matter. Sen. Howard
Baker (R-Tenn.), refused to say
whether Hughes and Rebozo
might be called as witnesses.
COLUMNIST Jack Anderson
in a report published yesterday,
said assistant Democratic coun-
sel Terry Lenzner presented the
outlines of the matter to the
panel in a secret session last
week.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, No. 30
Wednesday, October 10, 1973
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states 3
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

Anderson said Baker was .dis-
mayed' and that Baker told Lenz-
ner, "If you can verify those
facts, we have a whole new can
of worms."
The Washington Post has re-
ported that the $100,000 was ac-
companied by a request that
then-Atty. Gen. John Mitchell
overrule a Justice Department
antitrust position and allow
Hughes to add another hotel-
casino, the Dunes, to his exten-
sive Las Vegas, Nev., holdings.
THE MONEY was delivered
by Richard Danner, manager of
another Hughes - owned Las Ve-
gas hotel, according to Maheu.
Danner was hired in 1969 for,
among other reasons, his friend-
ship with Rebozo would give
Hughes access to the President's
close friend, Maheu testified.
Danner has been questioned by
investigators for the Watergate
committee, sources said. Ander-
son quoted Danner as saying Mit-
chell granted the antitrust ruling
Hughes wanted, but that Mitch-
ell didn't know about the money
relayed to Rebozo.
A COMMITTEE source said
that Lenzner also has questioned
Rebozo and that the two had "an
open discussion.
Yesterday's public committee
session was cut short after Buck-
ley's appearance. The lawyer for
the second former Nixon cam-
paign spy, Michael McMinoway,
was stranded in Louisville, Ky.,
by the grounding of his airplane.
McMinoway, who reportedly in-
filtrated Sen. Hubert Humphrey's
(D-Minn.) presidential campaign,
is scheduled to testify today.

I'

Eastern Michigan University
KALEIDOSCOPE presents

WASHINGTON, '(Reuter) -
President Nixon yesterday back-
ed a new driveaimed at persuad-
ing Americans to conserve fuel
supplies and reduce their depen-
dence of Middle East oil.
He issued a conservation ap-
peal after endorsing a report of
a citizens advisory committee
given to him at a meeting at
which the possible impact of the
new Middle East war on oil im-
ports was discussed.
THE COMMITTEE said that
more than 400,000 barrels of oil
a day - the estimated U. S. de-
ficit in the coming winter -
would be saved.if home heating
thermostats were turned down
by four degrees.
Henry Diamond, chairman of
the Advisory committee and a
New York environmentalist, said
the measures recommended
"may help to reduce dependence
on Arab oil."
Diamond was referring to hints
that Saudi Arabia, which has the

world's largest oil reserves,
might refuse to increase produc-
tion to meet worldwide shortages
unless the United States changed
its policy of support for Israel.
JOHN LOVE, the president's
chief energy adviser, told a press
briefing that the United States
would have difficulty in buying
heating oil from western Europe
if Saudi Arabia reduced its pre-
sent level of oil exports to Eu-
rope because of the Middle East
Crisis.
He added the United States
had contingency plans to meet
an emergency - presumably in-
cluding the rationing of heating
oil and petroleum.
Love recently announced man-
datory controls on the distribu-
tion of heating oil and propane, -
a gas widely used for the drying
of crops.
THE NEW CAMPAIGN to con-
serve energy supplies adopted
the cartoon character Snoopy the
Dog as its mascot.

Thousands of transfers with a
picture of Snoopy lying on top of
his kennel and saying "I believe
in conserving energy," were be-
ing' mailed 'to schools, business,
and consumers.
Nixon said a more prudent
use of energy must be made by
everybody - government, indus-
try and citizens.
INTERIOR SECRETARY Rog-
ers Morton said the government
had made an excellent start to-
wards meeting a presidential di-
rective earlier this year and that
it must reduce energy consump-
tion by seven percent.
When he issued the directive,
Nixon asked Americans to re-
duce their own demands by five
percent, by cutting heating and
air conditioning, eliminating un-
necessary lighting and buying
small cars that required less gas-
oline than large cars.

THE AWAKENING
OCT. 12 8 P.M.
PEASE AUDITORIUM
TICKETS: $2.50
JAZZ CONCERT
TICKET OUTLETS:
Ann Arbor Music Mart, Huckle-
berry P a r t y Store, McKenny
Union Ticket Office

i

Agnew outlines new
public housing plans

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS Presents
GEORGE BERNARD SHAW'S
&aint ran
October 10-13, 8:00 P.M., Power Center
Ticket Office in Michigan League
Information: 764-6300, 763-3333 (evenings)

JACOBSON'S OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9:00 P.M.

NEW YORK (P) - Vice Presi-
dent Spiro Agnew said yesterday
that federally subsidized pro-
grams to build new housing for
low - income Americans have
proven a failure and called for
public support of different ap-
proaches devised by the Nixon
administration.
"There must be a better way
to help the three million Ameri-
can households that still live in
substandard housing," Agnew
said.
"OUR DETERMINATION is to
make decent housing available
for all low-income families -
without the housing project stig-
ma, the lack of freedom of choice
and the excessively high cost of
current programs."
Agnew spoke to a luncheon of
the New York Building Congress
at the Waldorf - Astoria Hotel.
The Congress is made up of la-
bor, industrial and public service
organizations with interest in the
construction industry.
The speech was Agnew's third
major public appearance in less
than two weeks, but there was
no immediate indication whether
he planned once again to speak
out concerning the federal cor-

ruption investigation in which he
has become involved.
OUTLINING the Nixon adniin-
istration's housing policies, the
vice president said they stemmed
from the results of a six-month
study of the U. S. housing picture
ordered by Nixon last January,
at the same time he suspended
all new subsidized building pro-
grams.
The study found that subsidized
housing has not benefited poor
people to a degree in anyway ap-
proaching the tremendous costs,
Agnew said.
He said it found that six mil-
lion persons had been helped to
acquire suitable housing, but 24.5
million Americans continued to
live in poverty, At the same
time, some families with incomes
of more than $12,000 a year, well
above the poverty level, were
eligible for subsidy assistance.

r!

SPECIAL!- HOT CHOCOLATE

__

I1

Everyone \A
LOTS OF PEOPLE

Velcome!

GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR

I

WEDNESDAY 3
8-10 p.m.
West Conference
Room, 4th Floor
RACKHAM .
LOTS OF FOOD

i

a
;;: r
i
> j%
':

/
Miss J has the lead
in a western set of
nailed-down denims
a-shapely shirt-jacke
yoked pant, the grey
two-some going in f
cotton denim outline
with shiny nailheads
5 to 13 sizes. $56.
JA
i
1 4

t and
atest
aded
d
5.
41p

I CAMPUS"'.1

People! Music,! Food!
BiACH CLUB
PRESENTS
tantalizing tidbits by
TELEMAN, QUANTZ, & 14AYDN
performed by
Emily TUPPER flute
Laura SHETLER, flute
Ken MILLER, cello
Beth GILBERT, piano
Cheryl FABA, piano

I

"THIS IS AN ARTIST'S USE OF ANIMATION TO THE Nth
POWER, EXPRESSING SOCIAL VIEWPOINT. BAKSHI MOLDS
ANIMATION TO NEW HEIGHTS OF SOCIAL COMMENT."
--William Wolf, Cue Magazine
as Heavy
Etertainment!4

_

Sat., Sun. and Wed. at 1, 3, 5,
7, 9 p.m. Other days at 7 & 9 only
SIDHARTHA

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