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October 07, 1973 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-07

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 7, 1973

Page Tw~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, October 7, 1973,

Out of the Whirlwind..C.
A MOVIE HOLOCAUST WEEK
"THE GARDEN OF THE
FINZI-CONTINIS .."
The story of a prominent Jewish family in the golden autumn
before they too were consumed by the, holocaust that was Europe.
ADMISSION 50c
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7th-8 P.M.
HILLEL-1429 HILL ST.

UN, U.S. DELIBERATE

'War

breaks out

Conflict disc ssed

by leaders

I

0/

'r

rw rMr

i

Association of Jewish Faculty & Grads

GOOD
EATIN'
and
GOOD
MEETIN'

(Continued from Page 1)
ber, Sir Laurence McIntyre of Aus-
tralia, with members of the 15-na-
tion council.
ANOTHER possibility was for a
full-dress meeting of the council.
It was unrealistic to expect such a
meeting before today at the ear-
liest, a U.N. official said.
McIntyre was in touch by tele-.
phone with representatives of the
countries involved in the fighting,'
a member of the Australian mis-
sion said.
Neither Israel nor the Arab side
asked for a meeting.
EGYPT'S PREFERENCE f o r
the Assembly, where there is
greater room for maneuver and no
veto, made it more difficult to mus-
ter a majority for Council action,
observers -said.

Foreign ministers and ambassa- warfare in that part of the world.;
dors of Arab nations met and au- The department spokesman, Rob-:
thorized Saudi Arabian Miniister ert McCloskey, made the remark
of State Omar Sakkaf to declare following a second emergency
their joint support for "the Arab meeting of the Washington Spe-
states, victims of the Israeli ag- cial Action Group (WSAG).
gression." The first WSAG meeting was
At a press conference, Sakkaf held in Washington yesterday
was asked if he expected an Arab morning while Secretary of State
member to ask for Security Coun- Henry Kissinger was still in New
cil action, he said they were await- York making urgent personal and
ing instructions from their govern- telephone contacts with permanent
ments. members of the United Nations
MEANWHILE, T H E State De- Security Council and parties in-
MENHIE THE tteD-volved in the fighting. I
partment said last night that the
United States will continue to ex- K I S S I N G E R returned to
ert every effort to bring an end Washington later and convened
to the Mideast fighting and is the second meeting.
aware of the dire consquences of Attending, in addition to Kis-
0*

singer, were Deputy Secretary of
State Kenneth Rush; Joseph Sisco,
the assistant secretary of state for
Near East and South Asian affairs;1
defense secretary James Schles-
inger; Central Intelligence Agency
Director William Colby, and Ad-
miral Thomas Moorer, chairman,
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
Before the meeting, Kissinger
talked by telephone with a number
of leading senators.
SENATOR GEORGE A I K E N
(R-Vermont), the top-ranking Re-
publican on the foreign relations
committee, said that Kissinger
gave no indication of any pending
American action.
"I know he (Kissinger) is doing
all he can to quiet things down and
I have an idea things will be quiet-

in
kR

Middle

East

INVITES YOU TO A
PICNIC
SUNDAY, OCT. 7 at 4-7 p.m.
at ISLAND DRIVE PARK
CHARCOAL PROVIDED-BRING OWN FOOD
Join us for "Frisbie" and "Football"
Look for "Association of Grads" Sign

(Continued from Page 1)
have an all-out war with Israel. He
saw the attack as an attempt to ob-
tain partial gains in the hope that
the United Nations would stop the
fighting when the Arabs had gain-
ed a foothold on the Israeli-held
Eastern Bank and made consider-
able gains on the Golan Heights.
Herzog, a former military intel-
ligence chief, said the Arabs were
not prepared for the Israeli reac-
tion which came.
ASKED ON Israel radio why
Egypt and Syria chose yesterdayI
to start hostilities, he said they
timed it to coincide with the be-
ginning of the United Nations Gen-
eral Assembly session to highlight
the fact that the Middle East was
still in a state of war.
He said they also assumed that
on the Day of Atonement Israel
would be the least prepared to go
to war.
Herzog said the Arab decision
had obviously been taken at the
Cairo summit meeting of Egypt,
Syria and Jordan last month. He
said it remained to be seen whe-
ther Jordan's King Hussein would
intervene in the fighting.

DESPITE HERZOG'S claim of a
limited conflict, the people in ma- J
jor cities of both Egypt and Israel
braced for wtar.
Tel Aviv, like all other Israel
cities, was blacked out, and tha
international airport at Lydda was
closed down. In Jerusalem several
hundred people gathered in the,
darkness at the wailing wall to
hear the blowing of the shofar, the
traditional Jewish ram's horn, an-
nouncing the end of the Yom Kip-
pur holiday.
In Cairo Egyptians clustered
round their radio and television
sets listening to the stream, of mili-
tary communiques interspersed
with martial music and nationalist
songs.
THE INTERIOR ministry order-
ed a blackout, telling Egyptians to
paint windows and car headlights
blue and to turn off all lights in
the event of an Israeli air raid.
The ministry also called for vol-
unteers to join government centers
for civil defense and popular resist-
ance training.
The radio told people to stay
calm and to go immediately to
shelters if an air raid warning
sounded.

/r

U

JACOBSON'S OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9:00 P.M.
SALE
Three-foot Square Floor Cushions
Or Comfortable Bed Rests
$10
Save now on cotton prints in a blaze
of color, woven tapestries, Indian
motifs, Turkish designs, gypsy patterns
...a whole collection of 36" square
cushions to stack and toss in multiples,
and a group of bed rests with arms
for complete relaxation and comfort.
Please park in the adjoining Maynard Street Auto Ramp.
Jecobson's will gladly validate your parking ticket.

seed Ifu t yUsn t ed down,"Aiken said.
The spokesman also said the U.S.
government has been reviewing
(Continued from Page 1) -division: either undergraduate or emergency and evacuation plans
housing lettuce boycott, two ques- graduate; and for Americans in the fighting
tions on the Rackham Graduate -unit: depending on which school areas, but no instruction had been
School, a question on dorm rates, or college the voter is registered issued for removal of either civil-
and possibly a question on the in. ians or officials.
tuition strike.
According to Strauss, each vot- i THERE WILL BE 18 different EARLIER, it had been revealed
er must vote three times, once in polling places for the election, that leaves had been cancelled for
each separate constituency. The which will be open from 9:00 to sailors in the U. S. sixth fleet in
three constituencies are determin- 5:00 on Tuesday, Oct. 9 and the Mediterranean.
ed by: Wednesday, Oct. 10, and from 9:00 President Nixon learned of the
-residency: where the voter lives; to 12:00 on Thursday morning, fighting in an early morning tele-
Oct. 11. .,_phone call from Kissinger.

I

'I

The ballots will be counted on
Thursday night and the results will
be known by 9:00 Friday morning.
SGC Elections, have always been
expensive, and SGC has estimated
this one will cost $5,000; however,
Strauss feels he can run it for
$3,500.
. -

i
.
;, ,
E

The Florida White House viewed
the fighting with growing alarm,
but withheld comment on any ac-
tion it might decide to take in the
United Nations Security Council or
elsewhere to obtain a ceasefire.

DA ILY OFFICIA L BU L LETIN
TO.RY; ;":;";.V c: i '>v:""r""' " A<Nm J"';;11 Y{. ' ) CS';::"'" 1m .. '+ {"'" m a " +

Thi8 worU
$2. 00 8:30
FRI.-SAT.-SUN.
Elektra Record's
PAUL
SIEBEL

1 1

WOMEN'S
BOWLING LEAGUE
NOW FORMING
SIGN UP AT THE
MICHIGAN UNION
BOWLING LANES
OR CALL 662-4431 and
ask for bowling lanes

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, No. 28
Sunday, October 7, 1973
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

Sunday, October 7
DAY CALENDAR
TV Center; "Dicken's world: Mar-
tin Chuzzlewit," WWJ-Tv, Channel 4,
noon.
1st Annual U-M Invitational Straight
Pool Tournament: Union Billiard Rm.,
2nd Fl., at 1, 3, 7, & 9 pm.
Monday, October 8
Ctr. Russian, E. European Studies:1
Roundtable discussion, D. Brown, mod-
erator, "The Jackson Amendment &
Detente: A Roundtable Discussion,"
West Conf. Rm., Rackham, 4th. fl., 4
pm.
Physics Lecture: M. Abolins, MSU,
"n-p Charge Exchange Polarization,"
P-A Colloq. Rm., 4 pm.
Inst. Science & Tech.: G. Smets,
Univ. of Louvain, Belgium, "Photo-
chemistry of Macromolecules," Rm.
1200 Chem. Dept., 4 pm.
English, Linguistics & Humanities: T.
van Dijk, Univ. of Amsterdam, "For-
mal Foundations of Narratives," Rack-
ham Amph., 4 pm.

Music School: Doctoral Students in
Organ Performance, R. Luther, R. An-
derson, A: Cook, Hill Aud., 4:30 pm.
Art Film Series: Monet & Seurat,
Aud. 3, MLB, 7, 9 pm.
Music School: J. Dalton, Oxford
Univ., organ, Pease Aud., EMU, Ypsi-
lanti, 8 p.m.
Germanic Lang. & Lit.: J. Bilke, D.
D.R. Archives. W. Germany "Abschied
von Btterfield?" MLB Lecture Hail, 8
pm.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 SAB, 764-7456a
RECRUITING ON- CAMPUS: Oct. 8:
Burroughs Corp., Firestone Tire & Rub-
ber Co. Oct. 9: Women's Army Corps
Oct. 10: Social Sec. Admin., Liggett &
Myers Inc., Bell, System, & McDonnell
Douglas Corp. Oct. 11: McDonnell
Douglas Corp. Oct. 19: Gantos, Inc.,
Oct. 16: Univ. of Rochester (Grad. Sch.
of Mgt.); Cargill, Inc.; Boston Univ,
Law Oct. 17: Indiana Univ., Law; wash.
& Lee Univ, Law Oct. 18: vanderbilt
Univ, Law Oct. 19: Boston College, Law

7

i

I

SINGER
SONGWRITER

14S[ Hill STREET
711S

I

AND
Buddy Guy
and Jr. Wells
saturday
oct.13,8pm
HILL AUD.
"iedeF4..0$,45o,2O
4, Ieadg/d4 Ek4QrnI*4.,
* d k~~n

I

II

SPECIAL! HOT CHOCOLATE

Everyone

Welcome!
GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR
WEDNESDAY
8-10 p.m.
West-Conference
Room, 4th Foor
RACKHAM

LOTS OF PEOPLE

LOTS OF FOOD

Symposium on Jewish
Resistance and Survival
During the Holocaust

I

THREE PERSONAL TESTIMQNIES:
DR. MIRIAM BRISK-Member of a partisan
fighting unit in the Ukraine
DR. WILLIAM GERLER-Member of the Dutch
Underground
DRERNST FONTHEIM-Who as a Jew spent the war
years in hiding in the environs of Berlin
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9-8 P.M.
HILLEL-1429 HILL ST.

". perhaps the most remarkable film to
emerge since Cecil B. DeMille founded
Hollywood." -VERNON SCOTT, UPI

I'

TRY DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

Lj the movie: at BRIARWOOD
Adjacent to J.C. Penney 0 769-8780 0 1-94 & S. State, Ann Arbor

all.

I

Jacken
ATouch Of Class
12:15, 2:10, 4:05, 6:05,
8:05 & 10:10

the HES A CO..A. WA3hN[..
WAM MION A gD o Am
1 E
12:40, 2:50, 5, 7:10,
9:20

Universal Pictures and Robert Stigwood present
A NORMAN JEWISON Film OPEN
DAILY
"JESUS CHRIST SHOWS
UFERS NR 9' 1,3T 5,
SUPERSTAR" 7&9p.m.
starring
TED NEELEY- CARL ANDERSON YVONNE ELLIMAN

ths

a.,,.
3MIt

This
cop
plays
dity
Take
away
badge
and
he'd
M to

.t
me,,.'

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TAVI nR

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