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September 06, 1973 - Image 37

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, September 6, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Thirteenl

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Thirteen

Local
By KATHY BAILEY
Ann Arbor is reknowned for its
flu, cold, and lethargy epidemics.
But local health facilities, sur-
prisingly enough, are offered in
proportionate profusion, w i t h
everything from a Free People's
Clinic to a Women's Crisis Cen-
ter.
And there is always the Uni-
versity's own Health. Service.
Probably the mainstay of all
health services offered to stu-
dents, the Health Service at 207
Fletcher still looks the same as
it did when it was built in 1939,
but it operates quite differently.
The best qualities Health Service
can b o a s t are its minimal
charges and the generally ready
availability of faciilties.
Within the building itself there
is a Main Medical Clinic-staffed
by 14 full-time and six part-time
physicians, a 24-hour emergency
service, and an impressive array
of specialty services.
In the basement, there is an
immunization, allergy, and an
EKG (electrocardiogram) clinic,
as well as a consultation unit,
where specialists from the Uni-
versity Hospital come to give
particularly in-depth diagnoses
and treatment.
THE SECOND floor houses
specialty clinics which operate
exclusively on an appointment

health
basis, with a base charge of $5.
These include dentistry (although
the long wait here limits its serv-
ices to emergency fillings and
generaly check-ups), defmatol-
ogy, o p t h a m o l o g y, otology
(throat and nose), nutrition, gas-
troenterology, and othopedic and
physical therapy.
On the third floor are the
gynecology a n d contraception

services

abound

plains, "We have tried to antici-
pate what the students require or
want from a health service and
provide them with it."
,CONSEQUENTLY, the Univer-
sity's Health Service was one of
the first to set up a gynecology
clinic, which still offers a man-
datory VD test with every pelvic
examination. The immunization

"Though anyone within earshot of the
Diag can hear caustic cuts to Health Service,
for the most part it provides a fairly thorough
medical service to enrolled students."
r r{drf.-:;{"{.i .::4::-:{{.:wC:'4 i.":'" ima n i'R:" rrr.<::-:-:"i {:'arii i'iiF;r, i.r, }

is, if not free, reduced to the low-
est possible costs.
FURTHERMORE, the Health
Service has established a tele-
phone grievance service, INPUT,
where students can register com-
plaints or resolve confusions. Re-
cently, INPUT also designed an
informative little pamphlet, For
What's Bugging You, that ex-
plains University and general
community health services.
As a matter of fact, any in-
formation or medical referral
service is indispensable to new-
comers to any town. Ann Arbor,
again is especially blessed in this
area.
Starting with 76-GUIDE, a 24-
hour, student-run telephone serv-
ice operated out of the first floor
of the Michigan Union, students
will find that they can locate just
about any kind of health service,
physical or otherwise, that they
may desire.
Other numbers to call for crisis
situations (m e a n i n g 24-hour,
seven day a week services) are
Drug Help (76-HELP), Crisis
Walk-In Center (761-9834), and
the Neuropsychiatric Institute at
the University Hospital (764-
5190).
FOR MORE specific problems,
Women's Crisis C e n t e r (761-
.WISE) is open from 2 p.m. to 1

a m., seven days a week. SOS
Crisis-Community Center in Ypsi-
lanti (485-3222) operates Monday
through Saturday, and Poison
Information and Therapy (764-
5102) is available Monday
through Saturday, from 9 to 5.
For m e n t a l well-being the
Mental Health Clinic at the
Health Services specializes in
short-term care and is staffed by
both psychologists and psychia-
trists. The University's Psycho-
logical Services on E. Huron ac-
cepts both long and short-term
cases but has only psychologists
on hand.
The University Dental School
offers truly dirt cheap dental
care such as fillings and oral sur-
gery, but the wait may extend
from 10 to 12 months.
The Free People's Clinic offers
just that, free care. Since their
office burned down last Decem-
ber, they've been concentrating
on referral services-
The University Hospital- offers
treatment at normal hospital
costs.
EACH HEALTH service has its
own advantages and drawbacks.
Generally speaking, the beauty of
Ann Arbor lies in its diversity-
-and this holds true for health re-
sources. The thing to do is try
out the different services and
choose what is right for your
needs.

clinic, the mental health clinic,
and the laboratory and X-ray fa-
cilities. The Health Service also
includes an infirmary.
Though anyone within earshot
of the Diag can hear caustic cuts
to Health Service, for the most
part it provides a fairly thorough
medical service to enrolled stu-
dents. Within the last couple of
years, Health Service has been
making a serious effort to im-
prove the general quality and
variety of services.
Dr. Paul Durkee, Assistant Di-
rector of Health Service, ex-

clinic is indispensable for both
students and faculty doing sum-
mer travelling.
And just this last year, the
Health Service set up an express
clinic called "triage," which can
handle simple problems such as
colds, sore throats, or prescrip-
tion refills within a matter of
minutes.
The low fees at Health Service
are a bonus. The first floor phar-
macy offers prescriptions and
non-prescription items for one
third to one half off commercial
prices, and physician treatment

Daily Photo by DAVID MARGOLICK

Co-op personalizes sale of
crafts, clothes at low profit

By PETER La FRENIERE
In the last few years the Ann
Arbor community has- seen tre-
mendous growth in the establish-
ment of cooperatives. In addition
to the food and housing co-ops,
we now have Hand Made Things.
The project was originally con-
ceived and launched last fall by
Jane Harris and Carolyn Schroth.
Everything from pottery, photo-
graphs, plants and panits, , to
jewelry, furniture, toys, and
roach clips are taken on consign-
ment and sold at the price which
the individual craftsperson sets
for the article.
Currently the store is self-sup-
porting, but with a very low net
protit. The store takes a third of

the price of- an article when it
is sold.
Upon paying a $3 fee, a- mem-
ber may use the workroom and
sell his goods in the store. The
workroom contains a large wood-
en table for sitting around and
sharing ideas, batik dyes, a small
stove for melting wax, and a
sewing machine. The store hopes
to acquire a loon.
AS MORE PEOPLE become
actively involved, the store will
take a lower percentage of the
prices on goods that are sold.
Right now m e m b e r s number
about 130.
Unlike the usual capitalistic
enterprise, the -store's goals are
to p r o v i d e the community's

craftspeople w i th an attractive
setting in which to display and
sell their goods, leaving out the
intermediaries as much-as pos-
sible.
Apart from providing a much
neededoutlet for our craftspeo-
ple, Hand Made Things is also
designed to please the consumer.
It is a people-oriented, personal-
ized way of shopping. If the store
doesn't have exactly the right
color or design, you can order it
- specifying exactly w h a t you
want.
Hopefully, Hand Made Things
will grow stronger, paving the
way for other community pro-
jects in an effort to cut down on
mass production, impersonal dis-
tribution, and exploitation.

THE CROWN HOUSE OF GIFTS CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO AN EXCITING
ADVENTURE IN GIFTS, HOME ACCESSORIES, CANDY, AND GREETING CARD
SHOPPING IN OUR NEW STORE.

We're actually 16 shops in one!
{ & CARD SHOP
(Ann Arbor's largest)
Over 500 designs of Contemporary Cards
Over 1500 designs in Everyday Cards
Party and Candle Shop
Season.Cards for all occasions
RUSSELL STOVER CANDY
MEN'S GIFT BAR
* CONTEMPORARY ACCESSORIES SHOP
* COSTUME JEWELRY
9 GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
RIDE OUR ESCALATOR TO THE
UPPER LEVEL FOR THE
" BATH AND BOUDOIR SHOP
PICTURE GALLERY
* GIFTS OF ELEGANCE
BRIDAL REGISTRY
I'i

SPECIAL
SERVICES
Gift Wrapping Service
Mailing Service
anywhere in U.S.A.
Monogramming of stationery,
napkins, matches, etc.
Delivery Service
0 flII+A

3

i

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