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September 29, 1973 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sdtu doy, Sep~tember 29, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Hoge Three

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Pose Three

THOUSANDS ARRESTED

Junta detains leftist leader

NOW SHOWING 7, 8:20, 9:40
"See the Movie! 'Heavy Traffic' is the most ingen-
i*sa combination I've ever seen, an amalgam of
cetoon and live film. A highly subjective view of
N*w York low life as seen by brilliant young car-
t6wnlsl Ralph Sakshi. It's fascinating and high
--Kevin Sanders, WABC-TV

"kelph Sekshi's idea of merging real
iatt dtotoons and vice-verso is done with
Visuals of undeniably stunning power."

characters
brilliance!

----Archer Winsten, New York Post

SANTIAGO (Reuter) - Chilean
troops hunting leaders of the
ousted government of the 1 a t e
Salvador Allende yesterday cap-
tured Luis Corvalan Lepe, gen-
eral secretary of the now-banned
Communist Party.
Corvalan, a teacher, was the
second most wanted man on a
list of 16 leftwing leaders sought
by the ruling military junta.
HIS CAPTURE CAME less
than 24 hours after the regime
announced a reward of $1,800
for information leading to the
capture of the men on the list.
The announcement also s a i d
that all the money found in the
possession of the captured per-
sonswould be handed over to the
informant.
The announcement gave Chile-
ans telephone numbers to ring
if they had information.
THE 57-YEAR-OLD commun-
ist theoretician was captured ear-
ly yesterday, it was officially an-
nounced.
His detention was the second

in 24 hours of a wanted leftwin
leader.
Troops Wednesday capture
Luis Espinosa, a former parlia
mentarian and activist of th
Socialist Party in southern Chile
IN THEIR SEARCH for lead
ers and sympathizers of t he
former government, Chilean
troops have been raiding sub
urbs and private homes, a n
thousands of people have bee
arrested.
Gen. Cesar Mendoza, chiefo
the paramilitary Carabinero po
lice and a member of the fou
man junta that toppled the A
lende government in a blood,
coup Sept. 11, said yesterda
there was a latent nucleuso
guerrillas in Chile.
"But measures have b e e
adopted to neutralize them," h
told the press.
THE GENERAL blamed man
of the 13,000 foreigners in th
country for spearheading "su
versive" activity. "One must d
tect and disperse this typec
organization," he said.

g
d
a-
e
e.
d-
e
n
b-
d
n
of
0-
r-
l-
iy
of
n

While the new military rulers
provided only a thin trickle of
information about executions by
firing squad and summary shoot-
ings by police, leftwing sym-
pathizers told tales of horror
claiming they were being meth-
odically hunted down and shot.
The government has denied
these reports.
AT SANTIAGO'S general ceme-
tery there are almost 200 new
graves dated between Sept. 11
and 18 with a majority bearing

the dates Sept. 14 and 15.
Officials of the junta h a v e
denounced reports of mass ex-
terminations and torture as left-
wing propaganda designed to
discredit Chile's new govern-
ment abroad.
But reliable sources said there
was a "witch-hunt" in progress
and that old scores were being
settled.
NEIGHBORS WERE denounc-
ing neighbors to settle old griev-
anlces, the sources said.

"'"ovy Traffic' may be one of the greatest Amer-
iten films in yeavs!,It is, undeniably, a history mak-
ig film. It's rated 'X,' baby, but so is life!"
--Tony Russomonno, WXLO
"This is on artist's use of animation to the Nth
we*, extpressing social viewpoint. Bakshi molds
AlAmetlo10 to new heights of social comment. More
iatments of brilliance, power, and depth than in
'Prits The Cat.'"
--William Wolf, Cue Magazine
N~re Spie..ro the
mekerb of"itz The Ct"
Rn fineavyn
3Iwiemmasmnt

Gribbs angered by
film advertisement

"N ASCINEMA
TO EVERSEE.
NIEP ThRA

ne HOLLYWOOD (UPI) -- Hiz-
zoner Roman Gribbs, mayor of
1y Detroit,; is angry with a movie
he company for advertising a new
b film in which the city is billed
e- as "The Murder Capital of the
of World."
He fired off a telegram to
General Film Corp. which read
in part:
"I AM APPALLED and strong-
ly object to the national adver-
tisement being done for 'Detroit
9000' . . . In discussion with my
staff you specifically promised
that the crime problem in Detroit
would be presented truthfully
and that there would be no in-
flamatory advertisements . . .
"I demand that you and your
studio immediately stop such
slurious (sic) ads.'
Producer Don Gottlieb replied:
"As long as murder rates second
only to automobiles as your
city's major industry, we will
continue to quote Time mnaga-
zine's line, calling it the Murder
Capital of the World
"WE WILL ALSO continue
claiming that in Detroit, quote,
honkies are in the minority, uin-
quote . . . When you change the
city we will change our copy."
In a five weeks shooting sched-
ule in Detroit they knocked off
20 characters, which Gottlieb
claims is considerably below the
Detroit average.
"In five weeks time in that city
they murder each other to the
tune of 70 or 80," he said.
Since Mayor Gribbs' censure,
business has been somewhat
more brisk than previously.
The movie has regained two
thirds of its cost in Michigan
alone. Inasmuch as the picture
cost considerably less than $1
million, Gottlieb must feel some

small debt of gratitude to May-
or Gribbs for the plugs.
Gottlieb, therefore, is not in-
censed. But he is firm, saying,
"The mayor is objecting to the
ads, not the picture. But he did
say the picture was garbage,
the company General Film Corp.
is garbage and the ads are gar-
bage. But we never discussed the
ads with his people."
"THE MAYOR is a lame duck,"
he said. "There will be an elec-
tion this year for a new Detroit
mayor, and one of the candidates
is Police Commissioner John Ni-
chols, who appeared in a bit
part in our picture. He liked the
picture and said, 'You told it like
it is."'
Nichols has since been re-
placed.
C18 MILLION
CREEP

AP Photo
CHILEAN SOLDIERS guard the offices of the state railroad in
Santiago yesterday as others search for concealed weapons. Mili-
tary authorities relaxed the strict curfew imposed since the Sept.
11 coup but they continue to raid homes, offices and factories to
root out pockets of leftist resistance.

releases

new

Spend a cheap night (or afternoon) with Woody
Allen. Four of his greatest hits:
"KAKI THE MONEY AND RUN; PLAY IT AGAIN SAM
Fri. 11:15 p.m., Sat. matinee 3 p.m.
AND-
SANANAS; WHAT'S NEW PUSSYCAT
Sat. 11:1 5p.m., Sun. matinee 3 p.m.
seporote low admission--not continuous with Heavy Traffic
iiw -~- --

list of campaign donors

THE MICHIGAN DAIIY
Volume LXXXIV, No. 21
Saturday, September 29, 1923
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail tMichigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier carnpus
area); $6,50 local mnail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

WASHINGTON uP) - President
Nixon's re-election committee
yesterday released the names of
secret contributors who gave
$18 million and disclosed that the
over-all campaign had raised
more than $60 million.
The donor list included $2 mil-
lion from Chicago insurance exec-
utive Clement Stone, $1 million
from a Mellon heir, $200,000 from
four members of the Rockefeller
family and assorted five and six
figure sums from U. S. ambassa-
dors abroad.
THE $60 MILLION total is about
:10 per cent higher than the pre-
vious estimate, given to the Sen-
ate Watergate committee by
campaign fund - raiser Maurice
Stans.
The reports said the campaign
spent more than $56 million and
still has about $4 million on hand
-even after recently returning
some tainted corporate contri-
butions.
The three-inch thick report of
receipts and contributions dur-
ing the period Jan. 1, 1971
through April 6, 1972, was releas-
ed by the Finance Committee to
Re-elect the President in ac-
cordance with a court order.

THE ORDER issued in July set-
tled a suit against the committee
by Common Cause, a self-styled
citizens' lobby.
Contributions and expenditures
starting April 7, 1972, had been
made public periodically during
the campaign under terns of
new federal disclosure law.
But in anticipation of that law,
Nixon fund raisers had harvested
millions of dollars for their cam-
paign and promised donors
anonymity.
THE REPORT listed two major
refunds made to individuals soon
after they contributed.
Arnholt Smith of San Diego,
Calif., donated $200,000 March 10,
1972, and it was returned 18 days
later. Smith, a banker and fin-
ancier, is under investigation by
the Securities and Exchange
Commission and some of his as-
sets have been tied up by the In-
ternal Revenue Service.
Cornelius Whitney of Lexington,
Ky., a horseman, donated $250,-
000 on June 8, 1971, and it was re-
turned Dec. 2, 1971. A commit-
tee spokesperson had no imme-
diate explanation for the refund
to Whitney.

STONE HAS SAID he contribu-
ted more than $2 million to the
1972 election effort and $2.8 mil-
lion for the 1968 Nixon campaign.
Some of Stone's 1972 contributions
were made after the new law
went into effect.
Altogether, he was by far the
largest contributor to Nixon's
re-election committee.
Richard Scaife, a member of
the Mellon family of Pittsburgh,
was listed for $1 million, confirm-
ing earlier reports he had given
that amount.
MR. AND MRS. John Mulcahy
of New York were listed for at
least $568,000 in the report.
The accounting of Nixon's elec-
tion finances was prepared by
Henry Buchanan, brother of
White House speechwriter Pat-
rick Buchanan, who testified be-
fore the Senate Watergate com-
mittee earlier this week.
In a letter that accompanied
the voluminous financial report,
the accountant said it was unau-
dited and based on reconstructed
information because "no formal
books and records existed at the
time we prepared the report."

in concert

I
i
I

Watergate committee
may speed hearings

BONNIE RAITT
AND
LITTLE FEAT
Proceeds go to Drug Help, Ozone House,
Cormunity Switchboard & Creative Arts

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WASHINGTON (Reuter) -The
Senate Watergate Committee,
disappointed over the results of
the first day of its inquiry into
political "dirty tricks" and the
ending of television live cover-
age, is considering speeding up
its investigation, Congressional
sources said yesterday.
Republican members of the
committee previouslyshad sup-
ported ending the committee
hearings earlier than Nov. 1, the
present target date, and some
Democrats were now said to be
supporting the idea.
WHITE HOUSE speechwriter
Patrick Buchanan, first witness
in the "dirty tricks" portion of
the committee hearings last
Wednesday, strongly defended
presidential politics, maintain-
ing that not all political pranks
were carried out by the Repub-
licans.
He defended as part of the
A m e r i c a n political "game"
ghost - written letters to news-
paper editors, low - level politi-
cal espionage, the forgery of

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OCT. 13th
TICKETS: 4.50, 4.00, 3.50, 2.50. Avail-
able: Mich. Union, Discount Records
S.U., World Hdqtrs., Ned-Ypsi, Hud-

campaign leaflets and pranks-
within reason.
Democratic members of com-
mittee had hoped to show that
Buchanan had set the tone for
political sabotage activities dur-
ing last year's presidential cam-
paign.
INSTEAD, Buchanan maintain-
ed hie had neither suggested nor
participated in anything imMor-
al, unethical or illegal-- or un-
precedented in previous Demo-
cratic campaigns.
The committee, expected to
meet in closed - session on Mon-
day, will consider lopping tome
names off the witness list, the
sources said.
THEY SPECULATED t h4 t
Dwight Chapin, Nixon's former
appointments secretary, might
be the next witness called, al.
though he is now fourth in line.
The three major television net-
works decided this week to end
live coverage of the hearings and
revert to their usual daytime
fare, with excerpts from the
hearings shown in the evenings.
D aily Official Bulletin
Satuirdy, September 29
DAY CAL..NDAR
University of Michigan vs. navy:
Football Home Game, 1:30 pm.
Musiic School: Con temnporary Oite.-
tions, {Aspects of Electronic Bound~s, dill
Aild., 8 pm.
Music School: Andrea Sikofsky, pi-
ano. SMR ecital Hall, 8 pn.
CAREER PLANNTNG & PLACEMIrN

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