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September 25, 1973 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-25

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Tuesday, September 25, 1973

THE MICHIGAN RAINY

Page Five

By ROY CHERNUI
FACULTY CHAMBER MUSI(
CERT, Sunday, Sept. 23, I
Aulditorium, first of a seri
sented by U-M School of Mus
dani,-Clavier Concerto; Huy
Sonatine for Flute and Viola;
Danzas Fantasticas; Rachm
Sonata for Cello and Piar
min, Op 9.
If you're looking for i
sive concerts of interest
pertoire, played by top-le
formers, look no further!
Sunday marked the ad
an important new chambe
concert series to the Un
Schoolof Music's already
sive offerings. T hi s

A

music j
tS though, utilizes more fully the
C CON- mature musical talents of the
Rackhain school faculty and select stu-
ies pre-
sic. Gior- dents.
ybrechts- While performances were of
Turina- high caliber, the unique program-
naninoff ming of unusual music literature
provided the most interest.
nexpen- The presentation of such ob-
ing re- scure works conjures up some
vel per- stimulating musicological ques-
tions. Giordani's Clavier Concerto
dition of c. 1780 is a fascinating example
r music of German (specifically Moz-
tiversity art's) musical influence upon an
y exten- Italian composer of the same
series, latter 18th century period.

culty play

The dominant Italian harpsi-
chord traditions of the Scarlattis
are nowhere to be found. Instead
there is a formidable imitation of
Mozart's stylistic crystalline pur-
ity, elegance, and rich cantabile
lines. The concerto is little akin
to Mozart's larger concerto
forms, rather a light attractive
divertimento - like piece in an
intimate scaled - down version
for piano, two violins, and cello.
The trouble is that it's not cer-
tain which Giordani wrote this
piece, Giuseppi (Giordaniello) or
Tommaso. Both lived and work-
ed in Italy concurrently.

Now comes the question of
German influence. Giuseppi, ac-
cording to much evidence, never
left Italy, and in those days such
obvious northern influence would
not be probable in the Neapolitan
musical climate.
However, Tommaso was well
travelled and know in London
and Paris for his operatic pro-
ductions. He was so well known
in those cities that publishers
often neglected to print his first
name on his scores, thus the con-
fusion as to the origins of many
Giordani works.
I am inclined to think the work
is by Tommaso, who wrote many
CCO 7
cow.1
score
By ALVIN KATZ
Everyone seemed to have a
good time Saturday night at Men-
delssohn as the Professional
Theatre Program presented An
Evening of Mime, featuring na-
tionallv known mime artist, C. W.
Metcalf.
Joining him on the program
were Tom Pierce and a num-
ber of students from Metcalf's
mime workshop here at the Uni-
versity.
The show consisted of a nice
selection of about 20 short pieces
deling with tonics as diverse as
dope, Gal, and women's libera-
tion, which were treated with
varying degrees of levity. The re-
soilt w-s a well bal-nced produc-
tion, at times moving, often
amusing, and always entertain-
in g.
Metcolf is a mster of mime,
as he demonstrated time and
again, displaving marvelous agil-
ity, remarknble muscle control,
and an "stoiishing array of fa-
cial exnressvrns. lHe portrayed
the entir? snectr1m of human
emo , wiV' eq'inl skill, switch-
ing deftly from joyous to sad,
56 Evening at Pops
9 Target the Impossible
8:30 2 Hawaii Five-O
7 Movie-Comedy
"Candid Camera"
"Smile When You Say I Do"
9 Woods and Wheels
50 Merv Griffin
9:00 4 Movie
"Police Story."
9 News
56 Portland Junior symphony
9:30 2 Movie
"She Cried Murder!"
9 Front Page Challenge
10:00 7 Marcus Wetby, M.D.
9 Ascent of Man
50 Perry Mason
56 Detroit Black Journal
10:30 56 In Days of Awe
11:00 2 47 News
9 CBSC News
50 One Step Beyond
11:30 2 Movie-Drama
"Torpedo Run" (1958)
4 Johnny Carson
7 Miss world-USA Finals
9 News
50 Movie
$20,00 Years in Sing Sing,"
(1933)
12:00 9 Movie
"Desk Set" (1957)
1:00 4 7 News
1:30 2 Movie
"Dorian Gray" (Italian 1970)
3:00 2 News

ra re i
instrumental works (many of
them concerti) besides operas
while Giuseppi is chiefly remem-
bered for a number of operas
and ballets.
If it is determined that Giusep-
pi did write this work, new light
will certainly be shed on Italian
musical life and influences of
the time.
While no such mysteries sur-
round Rachmaninoff's Cello So-
nata, it nevertheless presents an
intriguing view of an unknown
side of a famous composer-his
chamber music.
Some works suffer obscurity
unjustly, yet it must be remem-

vorkes
bered that most obscure works
are forgotten rightfully. This
work falls into the latter cate-
gory - extinct by the natural
selection process of time. To me
it was like his Third Piano Con-
certo, chock full of supposedly
sentimental and elegaic themes
requiring a lot of work by the
performers but ending up inter-
minably trite.
The Turina and Huybrechts
works were similarly not partic-
ularly significant.
Still, works like these provide
valuable understanding and ap-
preciation of their respective per-
iods and styles of musical com-
position.

Ends Wednesday!
OPEN DAILY AT 12:45
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
Feature 15 mir. later

I'' STARTS THURSDAY
She's 6'2" of Dynamite! "CLEOPATRA JONES"
ADULTS ONELY

.The very best F Im ever made" Al Goldstein

I0
46
z

;'IF,

lletculf mime

LAST
CHANCE
TO
EVER
SEE..

fine s
proud to humble, and loving to
despising.
I particularly enjoyed his ir-
reverent portrayal of God creat-
ing the universe, and his clown-
ing in a selection called "Rip-
off.''
Complementing Metcalf's per-
formance nicely was some excel-
lent work by Tom Pierce, a fine
artist in his own right.. The two
wv o r k e d together beautifully,
their scenes together being some
of the finest in the show.
A piece called "Mirror" (a la
the Marx Brothers in Duck Soup)
was executed with almost fright-
ening precision. And one called
"Grow Your Own' in which two
pot smokers roll progressively
more stoned was certainly the
funniest of the evening.
Punctuating the entire program
were some fine vocals and ex-
Wcbn

access
ceptional guitar work by Tim
Bays. The technical aspects of
the production were flawless, as
the evening moved along at a
comfort-ble pace.
The principal flaw of the show
stemmed from the content of the
pieces themselves. When the ma-
terial was fresh and light, the
pieces worked beautifully. Sadly,
many of the selections were of
the trite and overworked "mes-
sage" variety - man's inhuman-
ity to man, ecology, sex discrimi-
nation - and consequently were
woefully predictable and self-
consciously didactic.
The lack of originality, how-
ever, was more than compensat-
ed for in the excellence of execu-
tion, and An Evening of Mime
turned out to be a richly enter-
taining evening, if not an in-
spirational one.

6rV&31, CINEMA

OPE N "' 5 ; II7I

Daily Photo by DAVID MARGOLICK
Dangling conxrsationt . . .
Arnold Gingrich, publisher of Esquire magazine and proponent of "new journalism," chats with Univer-
sity faculty afid students yesterday in the Hopwood room after addressing journalism students in Rack-
ham Amphitheatre. Gringrich spoke of his publication as "open-minded" and "mnodern," also attribut-
ing "razzle-dazzle" to it.

UAC-DAYSTAR presents
stith

1

Morning Show
Rock

CULTURE CALENIDARi

to,

0

FILM-Cinema Guild presents Fellini's La Strada in Arch.
Aud. at 7 and 9:05 p.m.; Cinema II and Ann Arbor Film
Co-op feature Two English Girls in Aud. A at 7 and 9;
New World Film Co-op presents Little Murders in MLB
Aud. 3 at 7:30 and 9:30; Women's Studies Films series
features Reichert's Growing Up Female in UGLI Multi-
purpose Room at 7:30.
POETRY-University Extension Service and Dept. of English
sponsor poetry reading by Radcliffe Squires in MLB Aud.
4 at 4:10 p.m.

6:00 2 4 7 Newts
9 Andy Griffith
56 Zoom
50 Gilligan's Island
6:30 2 CBS News
4 NBC News
7 ABC News
9 1 Dream of Jeannie-Comedy
540 ogan's Heroes
56 PBS Fall Preview
7:04 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 Mission: Impossible
56 French Chef
7:30 2 What's My Line:'
4 Bo Schembechler
7New Price Is Right
9 Bewitched
56 Lady and the Stock Exchange
--Drama
8:00 2 Maude
4 America
7 Temperatures Rising

12 Progressive
3 Folk Rock Progressive
6 News 'Sports
6:30 Public Service Broadcasting
7:30 Jazz/Blues
11 Progressive
CAMPUS THEATRE
1214 S. UNIVERSITY
DIAL 668 -6414
Sat . Sun. and Wed. at 1 3. 5,
7, 9 p.m. Other days at 7 & 9 only
is an exquisite
movie:
-REX REED,
Syndicated Columnist
A NOVEL BY
HERMANN
HESSE
A FILM BY
CONRAD
ROOKS
R.

This Fri. Night-Sept. 28 Crisler Arena, 8 pm
$4.00 advance: Michigan Union 11-5:30 daily 763-4553 info.
ALSO: South 'U. Discount Records, World Hdqtrs. Records, no personal checks.
$5.00 at the door. Also on sole now: ROBERTA FLACK

MUSIC-The Ark presents U. Utah Phillips in a'
cert tonight at 8:30.

benefit con-

MUSIC SCHOOL-Trumpet Student Recital, SM Recital Hall
at 12:30.

.,
. , ,;

BAROQUE ENSEMBLE
Proudly Announces Its 1973-74 Ann Arbor Season
Featuring Four of the World's Greatest Baroque Performers as Guest Soloists
THE ART OF THE VIOLA DA GAMBA
The Violo da Gamba Trio of the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis (Basle, SWITZERLAND)
August Wenzinger and Hannelore Mueller, violas da gamba & Robert Conant, harpsichord
August Wenzinger has recorded us soloist and conductor with the Deutsche Grammophon Gesellschaft (Archive). He has won 3 Grands Prix du
Disqute. The New Yorker said, "I dare say that August Wenzinger and Hannelore Mueller are the greatest viola da gamba players in the world."
The Chicago Daily News adds, "Wenzinger's is the world's most artistic exponent of the viola da gamba. Conant's registrations were beautifully
conceived." From Hamburg's Die Welt, "August Wenzinger, the international leading master of the viola da gamba demonstrated admirably the
high art of playing." And from the Baroque Festival Saratoga Springs ". . . as Casals has used the cello, Wenzinger employs the varied nuances
of the viola da gamba with breathtaking mastery."
CONCERT AT 8:00 ON SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25 IN UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH (single tickets $4)
THE ART OF THE BAROQUE OBOE
Bruce Haynes, baroque oboe and oboe d'amore (Amsterdam, HOLLAND)
Bruce Haynes is one of the leading baroque oboists in the world, performing concerts regularly throughout Europe and the U.S. and recording for
Harmonia Mundi and Seon among other record labels. He has' performed solo recitals with many of the most dist nguished musicians in the
field of early music including Gustav Leonhardt, Alan Curtis, and the K uyken brothers. Born and raised in Berkeley, California; Mr. Haynes has
lived in Amsterdam since 1972. lie is professor of baroque oboe, recorder (along with Frans Brueggen), and instrument making at the Royal
Conservatory, the Hague.
CONCERT AT 8:30 ON SUNDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 10 IN ST. CLARE'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH (single tickets $2.50)
THE ART OF THE BAROQUE RECORDER & FLUTE
Frans Brueggen, recorder virtuoso (Amsterdam, HOLLAND)
Born in Amsterdam in 1934, Brueggen completed his musical studies the're, and now has made it a mecca for recorder students who come to study
with this world famous teacher. lie was appointed Professor of Recorder at two conservatories at the age of 21, and continues to teach at the Royal
Conservatory, as well as lecturing and conducting crowded masterclasses (Europe, America, and Japan), in his speciality, "The Baroque Manner of
Performance." The Los Angeles Times called him . . . "A true recorder virtuoso, by fare the most accomplished player that this reporter has en-
countered on his musical beat." The Cleveland Press said, "In old or new music, Brueggen reigned supreme on his instruments, a master of his
craft." From the Boston Herald, "On recorder and flauto traverso. Brueggen is a remarkably expressive player, always exhibiting an intense in-
volvement with the music." And from San Francisco, "When a thousand patrons jam Hertz Hall for a recital of recorder music, it's just got to
be authentic. And it was, thanks to the flawless technique of an unassuming young man named Frans Brueggen. lie spun out an entire evening
of the sweetest music heard in a long time."
CONCERT AT 8:00 ON SUNDAY EVENING, MA1ICI 24, IN UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH (single tickets $4)
THE ART OF THE HARPSICHORD
Multiple harpsichord concerti by Johapn Sebastian Bach
I na.. .tra, ,s . o f A A M 'se.wl be ioinedrI hthree nutstanding harnsichordists of the area in order to give this

Ceccato taes echarge!

Leading off Ann Arbor's 1973-74 concert season is the
Detroit Symphony Orchestra under its exciting new
conductor, Aldo Ceccato, The distinguished guest
violinist, Franco Gulh, will share in the
program which includes:

11 jLIvEkSITY
GAM T'ZCrA r1 rr

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