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September 20, 1973 - Image 9

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-20

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L Thursday, September 20, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

gage Nine

Thursday, September 20, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.

Boryla's bombs key Card attack

X ) AmULTSOldstY
"fie v~ery best Film ever made" AI Goldstein,

By BRIAN DEMING
It was January 1, 1972: Michi-
gan versus the underdog Stan-
ford Indians in the Rose Bowl.
In the game's waning seconds,
with -the Wolverines leading 12-
10, quarterback Don Bunce drove
the Stanford offense 66 yards
with five of six pass comple-
tions to the Michigan14. Then,
Stanford mentor John Ralston
sent in 5'9" sophomore R o d
Garcia, who promptly kicked the
game winning field goal. It was
a gloomy day for the Maize and
Blue.
That was the last time Michi-
gan faced the Stanford attack
and things have changed in Palo
Alto. Gone are Don Bunce, John
Ralston and, indeed, even the
Stanford Indians. Now there are
Mike Boryla, Jack Christiansen,
and the Stanford Cardinals to
face the Wolverines this Satur-
day afternoon in Michigan's 1973
home.opener.
Jim Plunkett, Don Bunce, Mike
Boryla: the names of the quar-
backs change, but the passing
tradition lives on at Stanford.
With an extra year of eligibility
granted to him by the NCAA,
All-America candidate Mike
Boryla entered the season as the
leading incumbent passer in the
country.
Boryla passed for 189 yards in
the Cardinals' opening day 20-
6 loss to Penn State, completing
17 of 29 aerials, the longest be-
ing a 37-yarder to Bill Singler.
The Cardinal star accumulated
these impressive statistics in
spite of the fact that Penn State
concentrated theirydefensive ef-
fore against Boryla and t h e
pass. "We knew he (Boryla)

r mi3tlillau l&tDiy
SPORTS
NIGHT EDITOR: THERESA SWEDO

Courtesy of Stanford Publicity Department
WITH HIS PASS protection beginning to break down, Stanford quarterback Mike Boryla (12) sets up to
uncork the bomb to favorite receiver, Glen Stone. Stone caught the lone touchdown toss in Stanford's
loss last week to Penn State, 20-6.

AN ERA ENDS

could hurt us with his passing,
so we put as much pressure on
him as we could," commented
Penn State coach Joe Paterno
whose "pressure" sacked the
Palo Alto passer seven times for
47 yards in losses.
The nationally-televised game
revealed the most blatent weak-
ness in Stanford's attack, t h e
offensive line. And therein lies
the rub -- the reason Boryla was
downed behind the line of scrim-
mage so many times, and the
reason Stanford's ground attack
netted a negative eight yards.
The key to Stanford's offen-
sivehattack Saturday will be the
performance of the blocking
corps against the stalwarts of
Michigan's defensive line. Effec-
tive blocking would give Boryla
ample time to display his passing
prowess in splitting the seams
of the Michigan secondary. It also
could open up a running attack
which would provide deception
to an otherwise aerial offense.
Speaking with noticeable frus-
tration about this apparent flaw
in the Cardinal scoring machine,
head coach Christiansen, in his
second year at Stanford, said,
"We'vegot the best men in
_there. We're a young 'team try-
ing to get better every week. The
experience from last w e e k
should help s."
The offensive lipe, coached by
Hudson Houck who directed an
undefeated freshmen team last
year, returns only two starters-
center Bill Ried and tackle Keith
Rowen.
Stanford, while not displaying
a strong running attack, posses-
- ses a potentially strong back-
y field. Halfback John Winesberry,
t a 1972 Rose Bowl vetern, is a
t proven runner although he has
had a history of injuries, and
p fullback Scott Laidlaw, who over-
o aged 5.6 yards per carry as back-
e up to Reggie Sanderson Ia s t
- year, shows a great deal of
, promise.
it The receiving corps 'has been
decimated by graduation and
1 Winesberry remains as the only
. tested target. However, ends
n Glen Stone, who caught an eight-
yard toss forStanford's only
score against the Nittany Lions,
e and Singler, will also be on hand
x Saturday to snag Boryla's pass-
. es.
Not to be taken lightly in add-
ing up the Stanford scoring po-
tential is the kicking game, es-
pecially field goals. A haunting
reminder of the 1972 Rose Bowl
z upset is Rod Garcia. Already
- holding the Stanford career re-

- U

w

A

-II

STARTS FRIDAY

cord for field goals, this silver-
toed offensive threat will be pre-
sent when the Cardinals take the _
field against the Wolverines.
In the final analysis Christian-
sen will send a brittle offense G, t ADULTS ONLY
centered around a brilliant quar-yu g o
terback against a notoriously "UNlqU
tough Michigan defense. "We're
just going to run at the people
we can run at," commented the
former San Francisco Forty- I PLAYBOY
niner head coach, "and there are
very damn few at Michigan."" y
tho hw I ayf
If you wear your hair longJhCs
be proud of it and let us NEW YORK MAGAZINE
take care of it
U-M Barbers and Stylists aI
Michigan Union & 31__ _ _ _ _ _
____________________ W I kill I

Goodbye,

Say

I

Hey

Kid

"
TODAY OPEN 12:45
Shows continuous from 15P.M.
QO5 HUNTER'
BURT BACHARACH HAL DAVID
s"LWWR'-;WIRs*CImEA

"IMPOSSIBLY BEAUTIFUL TO THE EYE"-Drew, GNS
ANOVELBYHERMANN HESSE/
A F1LM BY CONRAD ROOKS
"Both in music and
visible beauty the
pictur.e is a
continuing delight"
-Winsten,
FromOLUMBIA IURKS N.Y. Post

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK -Willie Mays will
announce his retirement from ma-
jor league baseball today, it was
learned last night.
The New York Mets have sched-
uled a news conference for 11:30
a.m. at Shea Stadium. The retire-
ment announcement will come at
that time.
Mays, 42, was acquired by the
Mets from the San Francisco
Giants on May 11, 1972.1
Mets maul
NEW YORK - Pitcher George
Stone contributed to two rallies
and Cleon Jones walloped a pair
of homers, good for five runs bat-
ted in, leading the New York Mets
to a 7-3 victory over the Pittsburgh
Pirates that tightened the tense
National League East division race
last night.
Stone, now 12-3, pitched six in-
nings and scattered eight hits, but
his biggest contribuitons came in
the third and fifth innings, when
he figured in the scoring of two
runs.

After Jones hit a two-run shot
in the second inning, Stone beat
out an infield single and raced to
second on a grounder. Stone then
scored as Felix Millan singled up
the middle for a 3-2 New York
lead.
In the fifth, Stone knocked in
what proved to be the winning
run. Jerry Grote opened with a
double off the left field wall,
moved to third on Bud Harrelson's
base-hit bunt and came home on
Stone's ground-out.
* * *
Cubs clobber
CHICAGO-Two-run homers by
Rick Monday, Ron Santo and Billy
Williams enabled the Chicago Cubs
to overcome Montreal's early five-
run lead and defeat the Expos 8-6
yesterday.
The Cubs scored five runs in the
fifth inning to hand Montreal re-
lief ace Mike Marshall the defeat.
Marshall, 12-11 with 29 saves,
came on with the Expos leading
5-2 after Randy Hundley doubled
and Adrian Garrett singled for one
run, Monday hit his 25th homer of
the baseball season and Williams,

walked to chase starter Mike
Torrez.
Santo drove Marshall's second
pitch into the left field seats for
his 20th homer, giving Chicago a
6-5 lead: In the seventh inning,
Monday singled and Williams belt-
ed his 20th homer. The Cubs had
scored their first run in the third
on Hundley's single and Don Kes-
singer's double.
* * *
Cards choke
PHILADELPHIA-Steve Carlton
raced home on a wild pitch by
Tom Murphy in the fifth inning to
break a 1-1 tie and the Philadel-
phia Phillies went on to a 3-2 vic-
tory over the St. Louis Cardinals
last night.
Carlton, who earned his 12th
victory .against 19 losses, started
the fifth with a single. Denny Doyle
doubled Carlton to third and he
scored on the wild pitch. Del Un-
ser singled home Doyle with an
insurance run.
The Cardinals blew a chance to
move from third to second place
in the tight National League East
,Division race as the Montreal Ex-
pos lost to Chicago earlier in -he
day.
The Cards lost two players dur-
ing the game due to arguments
with first base umpire Frank
Pulli. Ken Reitz was ejected after
protesting an appeal call by Pulli
on a checked-swing third strike in
the sixth. One inning later, Brock
was ejected for arguing after be-
ing called out on a close play at
first.
Ryan whiffis
ARLINGTON, Tex.-Nolan Ryan
broke the American League one-
season strikeout record and pitch-

ed a five-hitter to lead the Cali
fornia Rangers to a 6-2 victory
over the Texas Rangers last nigh'
in the first game of a twi-nigh
doubleheader.
Ryan struck out Texas shortstop
Jim Mason in the first inning t
tie the record of 349 set by Rube
Waddell of the Philadelphia A7h
letics in 1904. Two innings later
Ryan fanned designated hitter Bil
Sudakis with a low, inside fastbal
on a 1-2 pitch to set the new mark
Lifting his record to 19-16, Ryan
finished with seven strikeouts -
just 27 shy of the major-league
record, 382, set by Sandy Koufay
of the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1965
* * *
Hiller saves
DETROIT - Aurelio Rodrigues
lined a bases-loaded triple to high
light a seven-run Detroit fifth in
ning and Joe Coleman picked ul
his 21st victory of the season i
the Tigers' 10-1 decision over th
Baltimore Orioles last night.
Coleman surrendered six hits be
fore being relieved by John Hille
in the ninth inning. Hiller gave uj
a run, but picked up his 37th sav
of the baseball season to tie th
major league record set last sea
son by Clay Carroll of the Cincin
nati Reds.

Miriam, and jFriends
Featuring
Folks and other musics
dulcimer, piano, voice
at
TheUnoGalr
1st Floor, Michigan Union
Friday Evening, Sept. 21-8 p.m.
50c donation

SMaior League Standinqs
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
East East

r-
p
in
e
e-
r
p
e
ie
a-
1-

AEPI FRATERNITY
1620 CAMBRIDGE
KOSHER AND KOED is inviting
people interested in meeting us
to a small party Sat. Evening,
Sept. 22 at 9 p.m.
Information: Call 662-9538

a

-- .

W L Pct. GB
Baltimore 89 62 .589 -
Boston 83 69 .546 6'4
Detroit 80 71 .530 9
New York 75 78 .490 15
Milwaukee 72 80 .474 171,
Cleveland 67 86 .438 23
West
Oakland 90 61 .596 -
Kansas City 82 69 .543 8
Minnesota 73 77 .487 16i/=
Chicago 73 78 .483 17
California 70 79 .470 19
Texas 53 97 .353 36
Yesterday's Results
Milwaukee 7, Cleveland 4
California 6, Texas 2. Ist
California at Texas 2nd, inc.
Boston 3, New York 1
Detroit 10, Baltimore 1
Chicago at Kansas City, inc.
Oakland 3, Minnesota 0
Tonight's Games
Oakland (Knowles 6-7 and Odom 4-
11) at Minnesota (Goltz 6-4 and Hands
6-10), 2n
California (Singer 18-13 and Hand 5-
6) at Texas (Dunning 0-8 and Siebert
7-12), 2n
Baltimore (Palmer 21-8) at Detroit
(Fryman 6-11)
Chicago (Forster 6-8) at Kansas City
(Splittorff 17-11)

Pittsburgh
Montreal
New York
St. Louis
Chicago

W
75
75
75
75
72

L
74
76
77
77
79

Pet.
.503
.497
.493
.493
.477

GB
2
1
1 2
4

0

West
Cincinnati 93 58 .616 -
Los Angeles 88 64 .579 5%
San Francisco 83 67 .553 9
Houston 78 76 .506 161/
Atlanta 73 80 .477 21
San Diego 55 96 .364 38
Yesterday's Results
Chicago 8, Montreal 6
Houston 8, San Diego 5, 1st
San Diego at Houston 2nd, inc.
Philadelphia 3, St. Louis 2
New York 7, Pittsburgh 3
Atlanta at Los Angeles, inc.
Cincinnati at San Francisco, Inc.
Today's Games
;Montreal_(Renko 14-10) at Chicago
(Jenkins 12-15)
Cincinnati (Grimsley 13-9) at San
Francisco (Bryant 22-11)
St. Louis (Foster 13-8) at Philadel-
phia (Lonborg 13-13)
Pittsburgh (Rooker 9-5) at New York
(Koosman 12-15)
San Diego (Greif 9-16) at Houston
(Wilson 11-15)
Atlanta (Scheuler 8-7) at Los An-
geles (Downing 9-9)

it

T=LAB
Six week continuous T-LAB every
THURSDAY nite at 8 o'clock. First
24 accepted. You must commit your-
self to all six sessions.

ALL-CAMPUS ELECTION
The new Student Government Council will contain the directly elected representa-
tives of the various constituencies of students on campus. The new Council struc-
ture was put into effect by an overwhelming vote of the student body in the Spring
All-campus election. In a record turnout election, 92% of the voters voted for
the new reform Council plan.
The new SGC will be elected on October 9, 10, and 11. All of the seats
on the newly constituted Council are up for election this Fall. Each stu-
dent is allowed to vote in each of the three constituencies, residential,
divisional, and school and college. The seats up for election are as fol-
lows:

HAIRSTYLING
As You Like It!
NEW TRENDS FOR 1973
Trims-Shags
and Razor Cuts
2 SHOPS
DASCOLA BARBERS
611 E. University
615 E. Liberty

*1

starts ton ite at
THE ARK

1421 Hill

8 P.M.

161.-1451

q

r

I

UAC-DAYSTAR presents:
stephen stills
with manassas

Stanford Univ. Alumni

RESIDENTIAL
CONSTITUENCY
Dorms (3 seats)
Fraternities (1 seat)
Sororities (1 seat)
ICC Co-ops (1 seat)
Univ. Married Housing
(1 seat)
Independent Housing
(apartments) (6 seats)

DIVISIONAL
CONSTITUENCY
Rackham (grad)
(2 seats)
Undergraduate
(6 seats)
Professional
(Non-Rackham grad)
(2 seats)

&

Friends

SCHOOL and COLLEGE
CONSTITUENCY
LSA (4 seats)
Engineering (1 seat)
Education (1 seat)
Law (1 seat)
Medical (1 seat)
Business (1 seat)
Nursing (1 seat)
Arch,. & Design (1 seat)
Music (1 seat)
Social Work (1 seat)
Dentistry (1 seat)
Natural Resources
(1 seat)
Library Science (1 seat)
Inter-College degree
n aarne f at e l

GALA c\ /E NT

friday, sept.28
crisler arena-8 p.m.

in concert

SATURDAY, Sept.
MUSIC & DANCING

22-8

p.m.

You can run for office in any district of which
you are a constituent. Filing forms are avail-
able in the SGC office on the third floor of the
Michigan Union, room 3X. The filing deadline

14.00 advance

WnItinn Will Anfc

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