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September 20, 1973 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-20

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Page Eight

A

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i hursday, September ZU, l y i J

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY thursday, September ZU, I'~iI~
I.

Gridde Pickings
"John?"
"Susan?"

Blue

co-capta ins

"I dotn't know if I want to go through with this."
"Relax, baby, relax. It only takes a couple of minutes."
"MMMmmmmmmmm"
"Ohhhhhhhhhhhh"
"GOOOOOOOOOOOOD!"
"Incredible."
"I can't believe it. I was so reluctant, so scared. I can't believe
it was so simple, so much fun, so... beautiful."
"Now, if I can get this in to the Michigan Daily by midnight to-
morrow, we just might win ourselves a free Mr. Pizza pizza."
1. Stanford at MICHIGAN 13. Washington State at Arizona
(pick score) State
2. Michigan State at Syracuse 14. North Carolina State at
3. Iowa at UCLA Nebraska
4. Miami (Ohio) at Purdue 15. Grambling vs. Morgan State
5. Illinois at California (game in New York City)
6. Indiana at Arizona 16. Tulsa at Kansas State
7. Northwestern at Notre Dame 17. Eastern Michigan at Indiana
8. Colorado at Wisconsin State
9. North Dakota at Minnesota 18. Texas A & M at Louisiana State
10. Southern Cal at Georgia Tech 19. Montclair State at East
11. Texas at Miami (Fla.) Stroudsburg
12. Alabama at Kentucky 20. DAILY LIBELS at Vassar

leudd
By GEORGE HASTINGS
By all the measurable quali-
ties - size, speed, experience -
the Michigan Wolverines certain-
ly rank among the top of the col-
legiate football teams. But, ac-
cording-to Michigan coach Bo
Schembechler, there is another
less-easily measurable area
which is also of paramount im-
portance to a football team:
team leadership.
That is why Schembechler is
quite pleased at the election last
week of the co-captains for the
1973 Wolverines, Dave Gallagher
for the defense and Paul Seal
for the offense.
Gallagher and Seal see eye-to-
eye with their coach on the role
of senior leadership on the team.
"Bo stresses senior leadership
as the key to success," says Gal-
lagher, "He feels, and I agree,
that the type of attitude the sen-
iors on the team create will in-
fluence the whole team, and can
make the difference between a
successful or unsuccessful sea-
son. For the captains, as the,
leading seniors, this role is even
greater."
"I'm certainly not the rah-rah,

!ud

for. title

1

TAKE A BITE AND FEEL ALL RIGHT!

WRITE
LIGHTNING
NEVER
STRIKES
TWICE-
'CAUSE
(ONCE
is
PLENTY !

It's a
Booze-Running,
Motor-Gunning,
Law-
Breaking,
Hip-
Shaking,
Man-Teasing,
Woman-
Pleasing,
Fast-Acting
EX
CITE
MENT!

1 04Washers & Dryers
NO WAITING
4 LB. MINI-LOAD DRY CLEANING
Mr. Stadium Coin Laundry
1958 South Industrial Hwy.
Near E. Stadium & State Street

i

FRIDAY

r

fire-'em-up type of guy," says
Gallagher, "It's a different type
of leadership Bo is expecting
from the captains."
"There are different ways to
get a team up, and Bo and the
coaches are going to take care of
any speeches or that type of
thing. The captains, on the other
hand, are closer to the players
and can lead more by example,
by giving 100 per cent of our-
selves all the time."
The captains also mentioned
seeing themselves as "middle-
men" between Schembechler and
the players, and as kind of
"coaches on the field" once the
game begins. But by far their
biggest impression of the job is
that of the great honor they
feel in having been elected to it
by their teammates.
"I feel happier about being
elected captain," says Gallagher,
"than I would about being elect-
ed All-American. This was voted
on by my teammates, and they
know Paul and myself better
than any sportswriters who
might be voting for All-America.
I take this honor very seriously."
Gallagher, the defensive cap-
tain, comes from a fairly small
town in Ohio, Piqua. He had mix-
ed feelings about coming to
Michigan, because, as he puts it
"I wasn't sure I could play Big
Ten football." He began his
Michigan career as a linebacker,
then was switched to defensive
tackle, a move which initially
disappointed him.
But at the beginning of his
sophomore season, an injury to
Fred Grambau gave him a
chance to play several games.
He displayed the fierceness and
especially the quickness which,
he feels, is the most important
factor for a tackle in Michigan's
defense, enough so that he was
chosen a sophomore All-Ameri-
can.
Now, after a super season last
year as the starter at a tackle
post, Galagher looms as a favor-
ite for All-America, and is con-
sidered by some to be the best
defensive lineman in the Big Ten,
The son of a general practition-
er, Gallagher is also pursuing a
pre-med program, with a major
in zoology, and holds down a
three-point plus average. Right
now he is contemplating taking
on both a career in pro football
and the study of medicine in the
off-season, if the opportunity to
play professionally should ma-
terialize.
Seal, on the other hand, is
from an urban background, grad-
uating from Detroit Pershing
High School. The big tight end
was awthree-sport start there,
excelling in track and basketball
as well as on the gridiron. For
Seal, it was one of the toughest
decisions of his life to drop the
hard court game to play football.
Coming from Pershing, Seal
was aware of what basketball
can do for an athlete, having
seen both Spencer Haywood and
Ralph Simpson from that high
school go on to fat contracts
with the pros.

t:EVY-GARDNER lAVEN r.s;
NEDBETTY" O HPKNS" MTTCLAK Prduedby ARTHUR ( aR nd U A FV
ffi Sreeypi.by WILLIAM NORTON "D.'r.e; t byJOQA P'ISAP !i '4[ United Artists

Schembeehler is glad that the
6-6, 215 pounder decided the way
he did, for he has developed into
another of a line of great Michi-
gan tight ends. After watching
Paul Seymour play tight end his
soph. season, Seal last year mov-
ed into the spot like he owned
it, grabbing 18 aerials for 243
yards and three touchdowns.
With his ideal size and 4.7-in-
the-40-yard-dash speed, Seal, like
Gallagher, has been touted as a
top All-American candidate this
season. Although Michigan is not

i

NOON LUNCHEON 40c

at
GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE

Paul Seal

SEE THE LOW-DOWN SHERIFF
GET HIS DUE!
SEE THE POLICE CAR GO
"GLUB, GLUB, GLUB"
NEXT: "T.HE FRIENDS OF EDDIE COYLE"

OPEN DAILY12:454
SHOWS AT1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
FEATURE 15 MIN. LATER

(2

I

I.

Speaker: PROF. WILLIAM PORTER
Chairman, Dept. of Journalism
As a journalist sees it in the series:
"Moral and Ethical
Leadership of the Nation"

SHOP AT,
FOLLETTS

for books and supplies

I I

-

I

I-1

How you express yourself
depends upon your camera.

7

HELD OVER-2nd WEEK! _____as__li__
GEORGE SEGAL 1 IC H I [A N
SUSAN ANSPACH .
===The7-tre.Phne,..6290
KRIS KRISTOFFER-
SOLEYNTERi . OPEN DAILY 12:45
SHELY INTERS in FEATURE PROMPTLY
i ~AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9:05 P.M.
wh he"Grace with an intelligence
-and personal style rare these
days." -Zimmerman, Newsweek
A LOVE STORY FOR WIVES
WHO RESENT BEING TAKEN
FOR GRANTED

Dave Gallagher
exactly known for throwing the
ball on every play, which could
hurt his chances for national re-
cognition, pro scouts are still
drooling over him.
Seal is modest about his chan-
ces for pro success, though,
merely saying that "if I get the
chance I'd like to give it a try."
Seal and Gallagher agree,
though, that this Satrday they
would like to exercise their roles
as team leaders to the highest
degree. They remember the hu-
miliation of two years ago when
Stanford defeated the Wolverines
in the Rose Bowl. As Gallagher
puts it, "the defeat really made
the whole trip a bummer."
The senior captains remember,
7d the senior captains would
like a little revenge.
Sports
of the
Daily
Traveling Padres?
CHICAGO - The National
League clubowners, asserting
that they wanted more time to
study "the entire situation," re-
cessed their meeting yesterday
on the proposed transfer of the
San Diego Padres to Washington,
D.C.
League President Chub Feeney
said another meeting on the
transfer would be held within a
month at his call, but added that
he did not think it would be dur-
ing the World Series.
fGrif fin super shines
CHICAGO - Archie Griffin,
Ohio State's super sophomore
halfback, has been named the
Big Ten back of the week by the
Associated Press.
Griffin, who won the honor
last year as a freshman, had an-
other big day Saturday in Ohio
State's 56-7 victory over Minne-
sota.
Griffin, 5-9 and 184 pounds,
gained 129 yards rushing and
had 120 return yards including a
93-yard touchdown run on a
kick-off which put the third-
ranked Buckeyes ahead 21-7.
Wilt waits
LOS ANGELES - Wilt Cham-
berlain continued yesterday to
ponder a reported offer of $600,-
000 a year to jump from the Na-
tional Basketball Association to
play and coach at San Diego.
Although there were reports
that a decision was imminent,
Chamberlain's attorney, Sy
Goldberg said, "I wouldn't wait
at the telephone for any an-
nouncement today."
People! Music! Food!
BACH CLUB
PRESENTS:
Pat VAUGHAN, bass
Huw LEWIS, piano
Ellen BENSON, piano
Playing works of
Beethoven, Bach, Schumann
Thurs., Sept. 20-8-p.m.
. . - .- U_-1- -

(j

Today almost everybody is getting into photography
And it's not the snapshot variety People are doing
sports stories, nature stories, portraits-you may
even have a friend who s doing photographs through
a microscope. Or a telescope.
You also know that everybody has his own idea
about which camera is best. That s why it s important
for you to know about the Canon F-1. Because it's the
system camera that s fast becoming the favorite of
professionals. And the new status symbol among
photography enthusiasts.

The whole F-1 system includes over 40 lenses and
200 accessories. Its capable of doing virtually
everything in photography So whatever idea you
have for a picture, the F-1 has the equipment to make
sure you get it.
Because it was conceived from the beginning as a
system, it works as a system. All the elements are
quickly and easily interchangeable. No matter which
lens or accessory you use with the F-1 body you won't
have thle feeling that something has been
"tacked on.
What's more the F-1 is comfortable to handle.
Years of research went into the gesign of the F-1 body
and placement of controls so your fingers fall
naturally into place. You'll appreciate this comfort
when you're on assignment. It's also an important
thing to keep in-mind if you're investing in a camera
you plan to keep a long time.
Canon has been in the optics industry over 37
years. We make microscope equipment, amateur and
professional movie cameras and TV lenses. It's this
experience that helps make our still cameras the best
selling cameras in Japan. In America, it's just a matter
of time.
See your dealer for more information. He'll also
show you Canon's other SLR cameras, like the FTb
and TLb. Both of which offer accurate metering, easy
film indinn a wide rannof of PonS end thc enm

, { ..

J

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