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September 15, 1973 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-15

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'Saturday,- September15, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

'~ SaturdaySeptember 15, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY i-'age Three

Md.

politician

pleads innocent
to wrongdoing

DELI COFFEE HOUSE
SUNDAY, SEPT. 16
DELI-6 P.M.
COFFEE HOUSE-7 P.M.
FOLK SINGERS-FOOD-FUN
at HILLEL-1429 Hill

AP Photo
John Love, director of the White House Energy Policy Office, listens to a question Thursday during his appearance before the Senate
Government Operations subcommittee in Washington. The subcommittee is holding hearings on the energy crisis.
ENDS DECADES OF WAR:
Pathet Lao, Laotian government sign
peace pact following lengthy negotiations

BALTIMORE UP) - Dale An-
derson, the first Maryland of-
ficial indicted .in a political cor-
ruption probe that has spread to
Vice President Spiro Agnew,
pleaded innocent yesterday to
charges of bribery, extortion and
conspiracy.
Anderson, who succeeded Ag-
new in 1966 as the chief elected
executive of suburban Baltimore
County and still holds that post,
was released on personal recog-
nizance by U. S. Dist. Court
Judge Joseph Young pending
trial Jan. 7.
NORMAN RAMSEY, attorney
for the 46-year-old official, told
Young Anderson wanted "a
prompt trial."
A 39-count federal indictment
returned Aug. 28 accused Ander-
son, one of Maryland's most pow-
erful Democrats, of extorting
$46,420 from eight engineering
and architectural firms doing
work for Baltimore County.
Agnew has been informed by
federal prosecutors that he is
under inevestigation for similar
G allegations of wrongdoing. Ag-
new has denied all allegations,
Iand federal officials say that no
evidence involving him has been
presented to the special grand
jury that has been working since
January.
MEANWHILE, Agnew aides in
Washington were reported to be
furious over news reports stat-
ing that since his rise to pro-
Sminence Agnew received gifts
of food, wine and liquor from
friends and a liberal "celebrity
discount" during his 4 -year
stay at Washington's Sheraton-
Park Hotel.
CBS News reported that Agnew
received the discount before
moving to a suburban Maryland
home last June. Ahotel spokes-
Sman said that such discounts
are regularly given to prominent
tenants. The New York Times
and Wall Street Journal reported
Friday that for several years
Agnew regularly received free
groceries 'from Joseph H. Rash,
a Baltimore executive of the
Food Fair supermarket chain.
Rash was quoted by the Times
as saying that he and Agnew
were close friends and that the
two men regularly- exchanged
gifts. The Journal reported that
the vice president received cash
gifts totaling $15,000 from Mary-
land's industrialist Harry A.
Dundore and alcoholic beverages
from J. Walter Jones, an Anna-
polis, Md., banker who is one
of Agnew's closest associates.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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2210 Michigan Union
763-3548
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for course credit
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r - -

VIENTIANE (Reuter) - The
Laotian government and the pro-
communist Pathet Lao today op-
ened the way to peace in Laos by
signing an agreement determining
the Indochina kingdom's political;
and military future.
The signing of the 28-article
agreement, in the presence of
Prime Minister Souvana Phouma,
was the final act in lengthy efforts
to end more than two decades of
factional war in the country.
IT IS THE FIRST full peace set-
tlement signed between opposing
factions in any of the three war-
ravaged Indochina countries.
Senior negotiators Pheng Phong-
savan and Ngon Sananikone signed
for the Laotian government at the
ceremony, which was attended by
members of the diplomatic corps.
Top Pathet Lao representatives
Phoumi Vongvichit and Phoune
Sipraseuth signed for the pro-
communist side.
The agreement climaxes almost
seven months of tough bargaining
since the February 21 ceasefire
accord which formally ended fight-
ing in Laos.
It also puts the seal on Prince
Souvanna Phouma's efforts to
bring unity to the landlocked
country, known as "the kingdom
of a million elephants."
DURING RECENT weeks of ten-
sion it seemed that all progress
in negotiations had been put at,
risk by the abortive coup Aug. 20
by former Laotian military offic-;
ers living in exile in neighboring+
Thailand.
Loyal government forces quickly
crushed the revolt. But it alarmed
both Pathet Lao and Laotian mili-
tary leaders to the point where
contact between the two sides
came to a virtual halt. Each side
accused the other of taking an un-
acceptable position.
But Prime Minister Souvanna,
recognized as a unifying force even
by the Pathet Lao, apparently;
managed to work out a compro-
mise.
THE PEACE agreement, which
takes the form of protocols to the

February
vid sc fnr

ceasefire accord, pro-
the formati n of a new

coalition government before Oct.'
10 and establishment of a political
consultative council which will,
among other things, organize na-
tional elections at a date to be
fixed.
Prince Souvanna will remain
prime minister with two deputy
premiers of equal rank - one
from each side.
Cabinet portofolios will be, di-
vided between the present govern-
ment, the Pathet Lao and neu-,
tralists. The two main parties will
each have five ministries and the
neutralists two.
THOSE HELD by the present
government will include the de-1
fense, finance and interior minis-I
tries while foreign affairs and the
economy portofolios will be among
those held by the Pathet Lao..
The Ministry of Posts and Tele-
graphs, and the Justice Ministry
will be headed by neutralists.
The agreement covers demarca-
tion of territory and terms for the
neutralization of Vientiane, the ad-
ministrative capital, and Luang,
Prabang, the royal Capital.
IT PROVIDES for a battalion of
troops from each side to be sta-
tioned in Vientiane and for a mixed
1000-man police force made up,
from each side.
Pathet Lao forces will take part
in maintaining security, immigra-
tion, and the defense of airports,j
supply depots and food stores -
one of the main stumbling blocks
in latter stages of negotiations the1
government had wanted Pathet
Lao troops restricted to acting as
security guards for their own min-
isters and officials in the two capi-
tals.
At a press conference after they
signing at his office here, Prince;
Souvana Phouma said he hoped
that other countries would help
Laos in its post-war reconstruction;
and establishment of peace.
THE 73-YEAR-OLD leader, smil-;
ing and looking very happy after
the signing, said there would be!
many difficulties in the days

ahead. Both sides had many tasks USUALLY RELIABLE sources
to undertake to put the protocols said that in the coalition govern-
into operation and also to under- ment the Pathet Lao leader Prince
stand each other, he said. Souphanouvong - half-brother to
He denied the agreement had Prince Souvanna - would become
been brought about by any foreign minister and chief
pressure but said the two sides had foreign niter gand i Vien-
been helped by the spirit of inter- tiane negotiator Ngon Sananikone
national detente. would be defense minister.
France ends nuclear
test series in Pacific

trade bars
TOKYO (Reuter) - One hun-
dred and two countries yesterday
formally pledged themselves to
embark on negotiations aimed at
dramatically reducing the bar-
riers to international trade. -
A declaration officially de-
claring the trade talks open and
laying down the guidelines for
the negotiators was unanimously
approved at the end of a three-
day ministerial conference of
the general agreement on tariffs
and trade.
A NEGOTIATING committee
comprising all the countries that
want to take part on the bargain-
ing will hold its first meeting in
Geneva Oct. 24.
The talks are then expected to
last at least two years before
a final agreement can be reach-
ed.
The declaration said the minis-
ters intended the negotiations to
be concluded in 1975, but most
delegates regarded the deadline
as unlikely to be met.

ONLY ONE WEEK LEFT
If you missed the chance to have your blood lipids checked,
evaluations will still be done Sept. 13-14 and Sept. 17-21 from
8:00-10:30 a.m. at the Health Service. And it is still FREE. The
test helps identify persons with elevated serum lipids (a risk
factor in heart disease) and it will offer facilities for control
of hyperlipidemia (an abnormally high concentration of lipids
in the blood) and help find subjects willing to participate in
studies of the cause of hyperlipidemia.
interested students should call 764-8320 or stop by the Health
Service Information Desk for an appointment. You must fast 12-
14 hours before your appointment. When you arrive for your
exam, pick up a short medical history form from the Information
Desk, and proceed to the third floor conference room for testing.

I

S Weekdays
2 p.m. to
4 a.m.

PARIS (Reuter) - France
gave notice yesterday that it has
ended the 1973nuclear test ser-
ies in the South Pacific which
raised a storm of protest around
the world.
After five small explosions in
the atmosphere, the government
said it was lifting a ban on ship-
ping in the nuclear test zone
around Mururoa Atoll from mid-
night GMT tonight.
DESPITE THE STRICT secre-
cy that surrounded the tests,
other nations reported that the
five blasts took place between
July 21 and Aug. 29.
Their low yield - one was so
weak that New Zealand navy
monitors thought it was a dud -
indicated that the tests were de-
signed to perfect a hydrogen
bomb trigger device rather than
the bomb itself.
A Defense Ministry spokesper-
son said President Pompidou
would. probably make the first
formal French comment on the
controversial explosions at a
press conference here Sept. 27.
IN THE WORLD out-
cry against France Peru broke
off diplomatic ties and Australia
and New Zealand won a world
court injunction ordering the
French to call off the series.
France ignored the injunction,

declaring that it did not recog-
nize the competence of the
Hague InternationaldCourt in
matters of national defense.
French warships arrested pro-
test boats which sailed to Muru-
roa, but they did not interfere
with New Zealand Navy vessels
which cruised near the test zones
to symbolize the indignation
of nations bordering the Pacific.
The French government has al-
ready hinted that it will continue
testing in the atmosphere next
year, partly because it has so far
failed to find a suitable spot for
underground tests.
DEFENSE MINISTER Robert
Galley, who watched the final
explosion while scouting poten-
tial underground sites in the
area, told a press conference he
certainly could not promise that
France would not pursue its tests
above ground in 1974.
The end of the 1973 campaign
came with President Pompidou
on a visit to China, the only other
country still carrying out nuclear
tests in the atmosphere - the
sort which release most radioac-
tivity.
France aims at having its hy-
drogen bomb operational by 1976.
A
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