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September 12, 1973 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-12

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Wednesdoyr September 12, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Naga Nine

Wednesday~ September 12, 1973 [HE MICH WAN DAILY Page Nine

Police crack down on bicycles

rl."

-- --- - -

--- i
1'

(Continued from Page 1)
The District Court charges a
$10 fine to cyclists guilty of mov-
ing violations.
Police Capt. Robert Conn of
the Traffic Bureau says "there
has been no policy to go out and
write bicycle tickets. There has
been no change in enforcement
at all.
"WE JUST DON'T want peo-
ple to walk through a jungle of

bikes to get where they're going,
he explained.
City law says bicycle riders
are subject to the same traffic
laws as automobiles, such as
obeying stop lights and signs.
Bike riders have some special
rules, such as not carrying extra
riders.
Bicycles must also be licensed.
Police are not very strict about
ticketing unlicensed bikes, but
licenses are useful in attempting
to track down stolen cycles.

LICENSES AND copies of the
traffic laws are available at City
Hall.
Since July the police have had
foot patrols in the S. State and
S. University areas because of
an increase in robberies. These
officers would be in positions to
ticket illegally parked bicycles.
However, in August no bicycle
parking tickets were issued.
FIGURES FROM the Highway
Safety Research Institute list 165
bike accidents in Washtenaw
County for 1971 and 1972. But
James O'Day of the Institute
says only those mishaps involv-
ing an "appreciable amount of
damage and probably an injury"
are reported.
Ts support

Sell Ensians for Profit

Sales Meeting Wed., Sept. 12, 8:00
or call Marty or Bill
at 763-6 166

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Sontag calls aging
ordeal for women

(Continued from Page l) 1
attractive are thought of that way
because they don't look their age,!

The ain crisis sums up all that

is depressing in the way women ms i
are treated."

AUDITIONS
FOUR SHOWS
University Players Major Bill and showcase productions
THE STRONGBOX-2518 Frieze Bldg.
(PERFORMANCES NOV. 7-10)
CYMBELINE-2528 Frieze Bldg.
(PERFORMANCES DEC. 5-8)
AND MISS REARDON DRINKS A LITTLE-
2508 Frieze Bldg.
(PERFORMANCES NOV. 29, 30, AND DEC. 1)
THE MARRIAGE OF MR. MISSISSIPPI-
2512 Frieze Bldg.
(PERFORMANCES OCT. 25-27)

c
t t
4
ti
1

Sontag continued. At a press conference earlier,
MEN DO NOT have this problem. yesterday, Sontag referred to aging (Continued from Page 1)
It is much easier for an older man as "a microcosm of sexism," and pledge support to the group's reso-
to remarry after a divorce or stressed the need to change at- lutions. "Everybody is fed up this
death than an older woman. "Wom- titudes. time, it's not just us," he said.
en become sexually ineligible "Vice President Smith thinks he
much earlier than men," she said. SHE PRAISED the women's! can get away with things in the
Women and aging are a symptom movement for its success in bring- summer that he couldn't do other-
of a larger disease, she concluded. ing about changes in attitude, but wise," he added.
__he noted, "It's a long haul, a'AlnSih heUiest'
very long haul to influence attitudesI Allan Smith, the University's
vice president for academic af-f
and change institutions." fairs, could not be reached for"
Sontag, author of two novels and comment last night on the teach-
(Continued frog Page 1) numerous magaZine articles and ing fellows' pronouncements. Smith
in, the subsequent cover-up and re- reviews, considers herself a fem- is acting president of the Univer-
lated wrongdoing. inist and a "free lance human sity while President Robben Flem-
He said the tapes are particular- being." H ing is out of town.
ly important in determining the Wilma Scott Heidem, president of
truth of former presidential coun- the National Organization of Wom- WHEN QUESTIONED several
sel John Dean's testimony before en (NOW), also at the press con- weeks ago on the TF tuition situa-
the Senate W gate conmittee. ference, added that because the tion, Smith insisted that the lower
Dean implicated Nixon and the movement was not highly visible fees given to teaching fellows were
President's two former top aides, did not mean it was no longer a "friendly allowance provided by
John Ehrlichman and H. 'R. Halde-? effective. th nvriy ndta ors-
effectiveovr-u the University" and that nonresi-
BESIDES ARGUING against "In the context of centuries we've dent TFs were never actually
Wright's effort to have Sirica's or-ihardly cleared our throats," Heide given in-state student status.
der nullified, Cox also advocated said. "But we have touched a very He added that TFs would be giv-
his own position that the lower important nerve in western civiliza- en a one-year compensation for the
court order should be broadened. tion." change in fees.
Cox has asked that the tapes be._-
turned over immediately toth DilN WSHO ING
cauu jiy v with1tt heprvae

AP Photo

I'm coming out
Rumors that a subterranean race was surfacing in Kansas City
were quashed yesterday whenrthe startling object at right turned
out to be an artificial leg being used as a warning sign for a hole
in the road.

I,

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Daily Official Bulletin
..........msa...m...
Wednesd y, September t2
DAY CALENDAR
Commission for women: Regents-
* Room, Admin. Bldg., noon.
Physics Lecture : M. Ro, "How Mush
Energy is Required to Control PO u-
tion'?" P-A Colloquium Rm., 4 pm.
Grad Coffee ;Hour: East Conference:
Rm., Rackham, 8 ,pm.,

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Feature 15 minutes later
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