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September 12, 1973 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-12

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Page Eight,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

iVednesday, September 12,11973

It

Pag Eiht>X TE MCHIAN AIY Wdneday Setemer 2, 97

COME AND MEET US
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
MASS MEETINGS-SEPT. 10-14
201 MULHOLLAND (off W. Washington)

U.S.-FRENCH DISPUTE MARS OPENING

SEPT. 10
SEPT. 11
SEPT. 12
SEPT. 13
SEPT. 14

7:30-10:00 P.M.--PUBLICITY, BOX OF-
FICE, USHERS, MEMBERSHIP AND NON-
SHOW ACTIVITIES
7:30-10:00 P.M.--SET CONSTRUCTION,
PAINTING AND DESIGN, LIGHTS AND
SOUND
7:30-DOORS OPEN
8:00-ACTING
8:30-DIRECTING
9:00-WORKSHOPS AND ONE ACT
PRODUCTIONS
9:30--STAGE MANAGEMENT.
7 :30--DOORS OPEN
8:00-PROPS
8:30-COSTUMES AND MAKE-UP
7:30-9:00 P.M.-OPEN HOUSE

frad
TOKYO (Reuter) - A dispute
between France and the United
States yesterday has oversha-
dbwed the opening here today of
a three-day international confer-
ence aimed at launching the
world's most ambitious attempt
to remove trade barriers.
Ministers and delegates from
nearly 100 nations are taking
part in the conference, which is
designed to give the go-ahead for -
two years of complex negotiations

tf iks

in Geneva on liberalizing world
trade.
IN A JOINT declaration, the min-
sters are due to lay down politi-
cal guidelines for the negotiations
which, for the first time, will
cover not only tariffs but also
such non-tariff barriers to trade
as export subsidies, safety stand-
ards, and customs procedures.
Agreement on the text of this
declaration was almost reached
during a three-week preparatory

begii
eting of experts in Julv. But
i1 agreement is still lacking
r one passage dealing with
link between the trade nego-
ions and world monetary re-
m.
'hile all the parties agree in
nciple that the removal of
le barriers serves little pur-
e without monetary stability,
United States and the Euro-
n Common Market countries
,e been divided about how this
Auld be expressed.
IE U. S. also wants to empha-
in the declaration that an
ctive monetary reform de-
ds in its turn on efforts to
ralize trade.
he nine European Economic
nmunity (EEC) members held
meeting later during which
y came up with. a compro-
e proposal midway between
U. S. and French positions.

in

wards he was "optimistic that
an agreementcan be reached."
FRANCE has been deeply con-
cerned about the threat to its
ability to compete in world mar-
kets by the sharp fall this year in
the value of the U. S. dollar.
It has repeatedly called for
American intervention to support
its currency and is anxious for
guarantees that no further de-
cline in the dollar's value will
now take place.
The sources said that France
apparently wanted to emphasize
this point by delaying agreement
on the text of the declaration un-
til near the end of the ministerial
meeting on Friday.
BUT THE SOURCES' were
confident that such agreement
would eventually be reached.

sone of the developing countries.
Although the draft declaration
commits the richer nations to
take special account of the needs
of the poorer countries, some
developing states feel it does
not go far enough.
PROMINENT among these are
a group of Latin-American coun-
tries led by Chile which may dis-
sociate themselves from part of
the conference's final declara-
tion.
The concern of the developing
states was expressed in a press
conference yesterday by Jama-

ody
lead to a "very dramatic" lower-
ing of tariffs and also some re-
duction in non-tariff barriers.
BUT THEY were reluctant to
make predictions about progress
in the field of agriculture, where
the toughest and most difficult
bargaining is foreseen.
U. S. officials themselves ad-
mit that recent American con-
trols on exports of soybeans, a
major world so.irce of protein,
have psychologically damaged
their position in demanding a
more open world market for
farm.goods,

1

I I h u liii III'

Come Alone Tonight
WEDNESDAY
(singles night)
OPEN 'TIL 2:00
A1110 mor ngexPericwcin iinsouid and light
341 S. MAIN ANN ARBOR
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT SUNDAYS

France has repeatedly called for American in-
tervention to slip port its currency and is anxious

If you were unable to come earlier in the week please come
tonight. Members will be on hand to answer all your questions
about community theatre.

the

The only other question mark 1 r p*ji/ .*in

edine in the

hanging over what is basically jo guaranteestri at noj u r (ert ea
The chairmani of the EEC intended as no more than a polit-
meeting, Danish Foreign Minis- ical showpiece for launching the dollar's value will now take place.
ter Ivar Norgaard, said after- trade talks is the attitude of

.................................................................................................................................. . .

cian Industry Minister Peter Pat-
terson.
He said that the last great
round of international tariff-
cutting talks - the ''Kenndy
Round" of the early 1960's -
had been "a very considerable
disappointment to , developing
countries.
PATTERSON stressed his hope
that the new negotiations would
do more to improve the position
of the poorer states.
American officials were opti-
mistic about the Tokyo meeting
and said there was a general
concensus among all the coun-
tries taking part about the need
to launch the new trade negotia-
tions.
The officials predicted that the
talks,,,'due to end in 1975, would

But they also believe that this
year's world shortage of agri-
cultural products has helped
bring about change in thinking on
problems of agricultural trade.
THEY SAY there is now a
widespread feeling that steps
must be taken to ensure regular
and secure supplies of food to
all parts of the world, even if
this means changing traditional
restrictive policies in agricultur-
al trade.
U. S. officials are also con-
fident that President. Nixon's
trade bill, which would give him
the power to implement any
agreements r e a c h e d by his
trade negotiators, will betpassed
by congress without substantial
changes and in good time.

- ---------

Everyone
LOTS OF PEOPLE

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8-10 p.m.
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West Quad
ton East Madison
TONIGHT
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9

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