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January 21, 1975 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 uesday, January L 1, I y l

Page Twd

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY luesday, January LI, l~1~

City Coun
fndingC
(Continued from Page1)
FRANK SCHOICHET, Human
Rights Party council candidate
in the Second Ward, empha-
sized that "we are actually los-
ing money through CDRS and
Colburn's committee" explain-
ing $200,000 less is proposed in
Be careful with fire:'
There are babes
inte woods.

cil hears
Dmplaint
Colburn's plan for human serv-
ices than allocated last year.
Senior citizens emphasized the
need for a city bus specifically
designated for their purposes.
Victor Turner, a senior cit-
zen, said "I think one item ef-
fectively left out (of Colburn's
recommendations) is transpor-
tation for senior citizens."
"MANY SENIOR citizens can
not drive, climb stairs, or even
walk-we want our own bus,"
said William Burns, a member
of the Burns Park Senior Citi-
zens' Governing Board.
City council further moved to
authorize some $1.5 million in
tax anticipation notes to for-
stall a cash overdraft for the

J"%

city.
City Administrator Sylvester
Murray said the notes are need-
ed to pay "April, May and!
June's bills."
The Municipal Finance Com-
mission must authorize the is-
sue of the notes but Murray
was hopeful saying "because
of our deficit they will look at
us closer but I think they will
approve the borrowing."
The city has a current debt
of $600,000 with a projected defi-
cit for this year of $286,050.

Artist
KANSAS CITY (M) - Artist
Thomas Hart Benton, who once
said an artist fails only when
he stops working, is dead at age
85 after just completing his last
mural.
Best known for his rugged
scenes of rural mid-America,
Benton collapsed in his studio,
apparently while inspecting his
final work-a mural depicting
the origins of country music.
WITH THE increased popular-
ity of abstract and expression-
ist! painting, Benton once con-
fessed that he was plagued by{
"gnawing suspicions of failuree"
but continued working.
"Merely to survive in that
pursuit is a success," he wrote
in the' third revised edition of
h i s autobiography. "Pictures
'-U' keel
(Continued from Page 1)
was strictly a Regental appoint-
ment. They bypassed the ad-
ministration's choice.''
The source contended that;
both Rhodes and President Rob-
ben Fleming had favored Frye
for the deanship, and that this
accounts for the administra-
tion's three-day silence on the
appointment, which the Re-
gents voted Friday in a tightly
closed session.
Neither the president and the
vice president were available
for comment yesterday. The
University has so far made no
official statement on the ap-
pointment of Cobb.
Assistant to the Dean John
Meeker observed, "The general
impression is that Rhodes was
very supportive of Frye, prob-
ably on the basis of his running
the college so well."
ASSISTANT to Vice-president
Rhodes Edward Dougherty con-
firmed the Regents' final author-
ity in the selection and said he
expected a statement from the
Administration within the week.

Thoma
may fail to please, movements
may fail to survive, but the art-
ist has his rewards anyhow. He
may lose his public and his1
market and still get full com-
pensation for his efforts.
"The rewards of art, for the1
artist himself, are concomitants
of its practice. They lie in the
life-heightening acuteness of his
everyday occupational experi-
ences. The only way an artist
can personally fail is to quit
work."
MATTHEW Baigell of Rutgers
University, a leading authority
on Benton's work, said the Mis-
souri artist will "be considered
the last of the 19th century
painters who believed in the
American myth."
rs mum
The Regents, University
President Robben Fleming and
Rhodes all kept a tight clamp
on information yesterday, refus-
ing to comment on the Daily's
report.
Several high officials said the
fact Cobb's was a black woman
was the double-edged key to
her selection. One source claim-
ed, "Because the University
was having trouble with affirm-
ative action, they picked the
ideal person - a woman who
is black. It's perfect."
HOWEVER, Affirmative Ac-
tion Assistant Kathy Shortridge
denied that any groups had ex-
erted pressure on the univer-
sity.
Associate Dean for Academic
Affairs Charles Morris dismiss-
ed pressure from affirmative
action - concerned people as a
factor in the Regents' support
for Cobb. He asserted, "The
presence of one black woman
won't have that much of an im-
pact on total figures."
Associate Dean of Curriculm
Jean Carduner, who had re-
ceived no word from the admin-
istration, explained his disap-
pointment with the Regents'
move. "The faculty all wanted
Frye."
Mathematics Prof. Maxwell
Reade reported that several fac-
ulty members had called him
Sunday for clarification of the
unexpected appointment. Affirm-
ing his own support for Frye,
Reade emphasized, "You could
believe him."

~'AEWCtit Aed Woe ,go$t 90A

s Benton dies
"We're too involved with in- Country M"sic Foundation i
ternational prblems now," Bai- Nashville, Tenn., was to be hi
gell said. "He was a familiar last, but friends gave the stat
person, a comfortable person. ment little weight.
n a world with modern prob- He had said the same thin
lems, Tom Benton was a trip before he was commissioned t
back home for Thanksgiving." do the mural in the Harry Tr
However familiar and com- man Library at Independenc
fortable, Benton was no stranger Mo., and afterwards said th
to controversy. one would be the last becaus
"I'm just too old to do all th
"I'LL TELL you what's the , climbing of ladders."
matter with the art business in Ivey said Benton' wife tol
America," he once told a re- him the artist had finished hi
porter. "It's the third sex and last mural hours before he co
the museums. The pretty boys lansed on Sunday. The cause
with the delicate wrists and the i death was given as heart d
swing in their gait run the mu- 'sense.
seums because it's a field most Benton is survived by his w
living men wouldn't take on." dow, Rita; a son, Thomas Be
Benton had declared that the ton of Boston, and a daughte
mural commissioned by the Jessie Lyman of Los Angeles.
on LSA dean
MEEKER described Frye's i "a great step forward." Sh
reaction as "a whole mixed big added, "Sometimes outside pe
of feelings." Surprised that the ple can bring a fresh perspe
Regents had bypassed Frye in tive."
view of the firm course he has Women's Studies Director an
set during economic hard times Eogns Stui. Diretora
Meeker said, "Frye's the most English Prof. Margaret Louri
honest, straightforward person described her department's r
I've ever known, especially with action as delighted.
this budget cut thing, where we A source at Connecticut Co
are cutting flesh and bone and ' lege described Cobb as "an ac
not fat." demic-type dean who spend
However, Associate Dean for much time in cancer research,
Academic Affairs Charles Mor- iadding that "Cobb spends a ce
ris, admitting he had not been tain portion of each day in th
informed about the choice, ob- laboratory." Cobb is a fello
served, "The committee should of the National Cancer Researc
be able to reach around a dean. Tissue Culture Association.
I suspect something in the
search committee's recommen- THE SOURCE said Cobb
dation has tapped some new "well - respected," a d d i n
kinds of qualities and views '"She oerates quietly, and
a b o u t ways the University not a dramatic, way out ty
should operate." of administrator.
Morris guessed, "They may She was "the right sex, a
get an outside candidate who the right color at the rig
will be spectacular." time," the source continued.
BUT MORRIS described the Sue Maunders, former edito
selection of an outsider as "un- in-chief of Connecticut Colle
usual." He could not remember newspaper who recently tran
the "last time we had an out- ferred here, was pleased wi
side dean in LSA." Morris the Regents' choice. She prais
speculated, "It takes a long Cobb as "very aware, ve
time to see how things work. It student - oriented, always try
will take the better part of to keep Connecticut College
half a year to learn how the the forefront." Saunders sa
college is set up and how it op- Cobb has been "very acti
erates." ethnically, and is especial
Morris presumed that "Cobb concerned with black students
is able to do it." Maunders predicted that Co
Pointing out that Rhodes had would be "a real asset to th
recently named Nursing School school," although she specula
Dean Carolyn Davis as associ- ed that Cobb, who is not us
ate vice president, Morris con- to a large bureaucracy, wo
tended, "There is certainly op- probably be disappointed wi
enness to the appointment of LSA.
women at the highest level." It is likely that Cobb will a
EUNICE BURNS, chairwom-sh
an for the Commission for Wo- spring when she completes h
men, lauded Cobb's selection as duties at Connecticut College.
The heaviest smokers in t
DR. PAUL USLAN world are the people of the U.
Optometrist where about 529,000 milli
Contact Lens Service cigarettes (an aver age of 3,4
Full C n a t e sSe vc4
Visual Examinations per adult) were consumed at
548 Church 663-2476 Icost of about $11.5 billion
s48 Chrh 663-_ -1972.

. ' _ i
Xd .... . ... ' i 96
j {

AP Photo

B~enton

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN THEATRE PROGRAM
PRESENT1S
BREAD ar~d ROSES
a new play by Donald Hall

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Appointments Available
DASCOLA BARBER-
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Arborland-971-9975
Maple Village-761-2733
E. Liberty-668-9329
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Tonight: Linda Ronsladi concert
at Hill Auditorim-8 p.m.
Tickets at the Union Lobby until 5:30,
at the door from 6:30
UAC Concert Co-op reminds patrons that smokinq and
drinkinq is strictly prohibited in Hill Auditorium. Although
the vast maiority comply, it is not fair for a few selfish
individuals to cause the end of concerts in Hill. Therefore,
violations will not be tolerated. Please consider this before
you attend.

' / Es ;' . ,a, /
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STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIVERSITY
Home Cooking Is Our Specialty

ADVANCE SALE AND INFORMATION:
TICKET OFFICE ,MENDELSSOHN LOBBY, 764-0450
TICKETS NOW ON SALE

Breakfast All Day
3 eggs, Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1.05
Ham or Bacon or
Sausage with 3 eggs,
Hash Browns, Toast and
jelly-$1.50
3 eggs, Rib Eye Steak,
Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$2.10

Specials This Week
Beef Stroqanoff
Chinese Pepper Steak
Home-made Beef Stew
Eaa Rolls
Home-made Soups (Beef,
Borlev. Clam Chowder, etc.)
Chili, Vegetable Tempura
(served after 2 p.m.)
Hamburqer Steak Dinner-
(1/ Ib.)........$1.89
Spaqhetti in Wine Sauce
Beef Curry Rice
Delicious Korean Bar-q Beef
(served after 4 Dailv)

FAST AND FRIENDLY SERVICE BY MR. AND MRS. LEE

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SUN. 9-8
CLOSED MON.
TUES.-SAT. 8-8
769-2288
1313 50 UNIVERSITY
STEVE'S LUNCH

Price and Policy Changes
The Health Service prices have been revised
as of January 1, 1975. Some policy statements
have also been revised, particularly in the
charges for infirmary care. The infirmary will
now be charging for inpatient care from the
first day rather than the sixth. If you have
questions regarding any prices, call the clinic
in which you are going to be seen.
All individuals using the Health Service who
already have insurance are urged to re-exam-
ine their policy to ensure proper coverage.
Those who do not have health insurance are
advised to obtain some. Questions on Student
Insurance should be directed to the Student
Government Council Office; Blue Cross ques-
tions, contact the Ann Arbor Blue Cross Of-
fice; questions regarding other types of insur-
ance should be directed to the local agent
listed in the telephone directory.
And remember, for the most efficient serv-
ice, your ID card is required on each visit to
the Health Service
Problem, suggestion or complaint
about Health Service? Call

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