100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 20, 1975 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, April 20, 19o 1

Students Needed
for Athletic Committee
POSITIONS ARE ON:
e Advisory Committee on
Recreation, Intramural,
Club Sports (ACRICS)
a Board in Control of In-
tercollegiate Athletics
Interviews will be held Tuesday,
April 22. Drop by the SGC office,
third floor of the Union, for more
information.

I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

BOOKS

i

Sunday, April 20
Day Calendar
Women's Tennis: UM vs. Wiscon-
sin, Varsity Courts, 10 am.
WUOM: Future Worlds Series -
Gene Roddenberry, creator/produc-
er, "Star Trek," on "Inside Science
Fiction, Outside This World," 1:10
pm.
IM Sports: Family recreation,
State, Hoover, 1:30-5:30 pm.
Graduate Outing Club: Hiking, at
Rackham N. Entry, 1:30 pm.
UM - Dearborn: David Lewis,
slides / lecture, "Henry Ford Coun-
try," Fair Lane Masion, 4901 Ever-
green Rd., Dearborn, 2 pm.
Music School: Sophomore trum-
pet recital - Cady Music Rm.,
Stearn 8,2 :30 pm: Carol Pao, violin,
Recital Hall, 2:30 pm; Lorraine
Therese Miller, organ Doctoral, Hill
Aud., 8 pm; Gail Barnes, piano, Re-
cital Hall, 8 pm; french horn stu-
dent recital - Cady Music Rin.,
Stearns, 8 pm.
Musical Society: Vladimir Horo-
witz, pianist, Hill Aud., 4 pm.
UTP: Aristophanes' The Birds,
Power, 3, 8 pm.
Monday, April 21
WUOM: Award-winning docu-
mentary, "The Great American
Pleasure Railway," produced & re-
ported by Jim Russell, NPR, 10 am.
Botany: Gordon Hager, u.C.,
"RNA Polymerases and Transcrip-
tion Spcicficity in Saccharomyces
Cervisiae," 1139 N S. 4 pm.
CREES: Adam Sarapata, "Percep-
tions of Sical Inequalities in East-
ern Europe," E. Conf. Rm., Rack-
THE!
University of Michigan
Library
ANNOUNCES
AMNESTY DAYS'
Mvayland Z
AllRecrdsWill Be
Cered for Overdue
Books Returned on
Those Days to Any
Library in the
University Library
System.

ham 4, pm.
Audio - Visual Educ. Ctr.: To Be
Young, Gifted, and Black, resched-
uled, Pendleton Rm., Union, 8 pm.
Music School: Degree recitals -
Barbara Topel, piano, Cady Music
Rm., Stearns, 8 pm;; Matthew
Walsh, organ. Hill Aud., 8 pm:
IRichardStanley, saxophone, Recital
Hall, 8 pm.
Career Planning and Placement
3200 Student Activities Bldg.
Why not invest a year in volun-
teer educational or social service?
TexasCatholic Conf. is sponsoring
work with children & community
serva. in Texas; benefits $75/month,
rm. & bd. & health insurance; for
details contact CP&P, 764-7460.
Last PACE exam., in May; appls.
deadline in Detroit April 30; Appls.
available at CP&P.

Summer Placement:
3200 SAB, 763-4117

,

"-1-- T

nn l nr" . Tr nfor Rprrra h

l P

Konert i-oweu or Klcfard b ~er- There's one major poetic mis- I t'fLhesei
S.G.F. Vacation Camp, Boys, PA: hart, developing fairly directly take here, in that, presumably It of the series,
interview Monday, Apr. 21 part of from the traditionalist poets of the six words are not used for Gave some indications
morning & afternoon; needed -Iteer
waterfront director; further details the early part of this century. their definitions or connotations Of being like us
available; register by phone or in He usually does not follow the so much as in a mercenary way in the first poem, and the final
person. now prevalent trends of flip- merely for their representation 'one confirms the building su-
Attention-students: Last minute +pancy or morbidity. His humor of disconnectedness. He sees spcon that t i l igs i
camp job openings still available - dspicion that It is really is like
waterfront, sailing, riding (Eng./ .sry and usually more melan-%to forget that he says in another us. "It" and we are all take
Western), arts/crafts, nurse, doctor cholic than funny. There is a poem that our "blunders . . . "for a shadow", connected wih I
(family inc.). feeling of human extensiveness Are our additions to what is ;iv-' noparticular form so once
Be sure to register with summer forced painfully to revert upon en." As in some others of Ml4 n p ar om sh orld
placement if still looking for job again separated from the word
OUT o FANN ARBOR. 1itself, making man very small lander's poems, the artifie in 'outside. And in the last series i
Attention: Students in AA Weds. in comparison with the world this is so dominant that it lacks of the book "A shadow" is e ,
May 7 (not starting Spring Half) outside. It is helplessness - the the sincerity that would make plained as death.
contact Summer Placement for infocosene fthsese f
on short-term job - good pay. conseq ence of thissense f the reader want to believe him. "F
Fam rdi anLoisile y.=smallness - that is Hollander'sI It sounds merely iea aa Remembering the Fountain*'
Farm Credit Bank, Louisville, Ky.: , 2sud eey like a- aca-isoe ftebstp ;sn
Summer job opening for Bus. Ad. main theme, and he uses dif- demic exercise, albeit a skillful is one of the best poe ;s m
(B.S.) or Ag. Econ. (B.S.) must ferent approaches to explain it. one. the volume in terms both of
have quantitative analysis skills. In "Eine Kleine Nachtinusik" it language and of "meanig." Al-
is: BU-TA'TTTTT.ithough it is a complicated ar-
is:

TENSE 'TALES'
ollaner's pessimlstic poetry:
view of mans hopelessness
TALES TOLD OF THE self, even from his own history. human qualities, but even these
FATHERS by John Hollander. He doesn't seem to like the sit- fail to create much energy. "It"
New York: Atheneum, 1975, uation, but these, the words as sees:
100 pp., $7.95. symbols, are parameters of It's own dim pages
By TOMI DuVAL existence that must be acknow- N t b fe
ledged.Noteven bring, un
JOHN HOLLANDER is a tra- for their mere and sexual play leaves-both
ditional poet, much like Inexorable syntax. parties "barely afire even with

there's
Ciass-ified

His own windy shibboleth in
The quibbles of the pillow
case,
in "Head of the Bed," section
12,
. all is gray
Silence, save for his unresolv-
ed organ chords,j
he gives us some hope, but the
musician, who has "three grace-
less daughters" is blind,
. .. by a window giving on
His sunken yard.
Separation from the world has}
begun, even though an effort
is made, through the music,

' I t ii4t,s most apparent
in his use of repeated c:n-i
sonant, and especially vowel,
sounds, to an almost overbear-
ing degree. But somehow they
are actually pleasant in all h-s
poems:
... feeling tears from his
Eweeping brow,
Dreaming of intervals lost -
stretched out on
Wastes not of snow, nor sand,
nor cloud, he tossed,
And knew not why, in the
undying noon.
IHe uses these internal asson-

LiAt
Art courses now open
for registration
OFFERINGS AVAILABLE:r
DRAWING
Art 101
FIGURE DRAWING]
Art 102
A VISUAL FUNDAMENTALS 2-D
Art 103
x)+
VISUAL FUNDAMENTALS 3-D
Art 104
HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY
(ANEW COURSE)
Art 112+1
Vi.,yy ' , #zm e

to maintain a place in it. ances and alliterations to str.ng-
then connections between im-
HOLLANDER'S technique is portant words and ideas. Yet
ambitious, particularly in he is smart enough not *o em-
several sectioned poems. Per- ploy much end-rhyme, be:ause
haps the most ambitious, at it would then be too obvious, too
least structurally, is "Breadth., artificial
Circle. Desert. Monarch. Month- '
Wisdom". In an attempt to unite NVITH ITS emphasis on mel-
all these nouns into a single ancholy, most of Holland-
theme (based upon their all be- er's poems lack excitement and
ing "unrhymable" and there-'liveliness. This may be a man-
fore of a solitary nature), he re- ifestation of hopelessness. In a
turns to his central problem of group entitled "Something About
man's necessary separation It", Holland .presents a portrait
from everything outside of him- of some of the most sinister of

rangement of clauses a n dj
phrases, common to much :f
Hollander's verse, it maintains
throughout a definite lyrical
quality in sounds of rhythrls.
Speaking of what is no lo!ger
seen in the dry fountain:
... unquickened, the god who
lies entombed
In theenoon sunshine; and
no legacy
Of his, the almost-enduring
nymphs whose voices
Drown the rock talk and
water murmuring
Deep below their discourse.
This hints again at the recur-
rent hopeless mood, but it is es-
panaded to a comment on socie-
ty as well as on individuals,
since it is religious in origin.
Now he says clearly, paraphras-
ing the New Testament, what
he has always been suggesting:
What has been done here was.
done in green wood:
What do we do here now in
the dry?
He gives no answer becauseI
man is only a "Remembere","
not knowing that this fountain is
a signal of future dryness, of
whatever kind.

pletely personal issue. He is
writing about others, not him-
self. Approximately a quarter of
the volume is worth reading for
this detailed account a n d
some of the more intriguing
ideas he deals with; and ano-
ther quarter for the apprer'-
tion of his often remarkable
technical abilities.
Tomr DuVal, a former Gener-
a/ion e d iit o r, not only reads
moetry but writes about it fre-
Yo u k A nd Ser vie d
Ths d~o~e
at it LikvermsAng meri
hi re
Of course you would.
You work hard. And you're good
at it. Like most Americans.
But, if all of us did just a
little better, we'd wind
up with better products, better
services and even more
pride in the work we do.
America. It only works
as well as we do.

1a

I . 1
J t 1 t ' 1 i,"

I A CONTROLLED pessimism
1 ' i

prevails. It never becomes
an obsession because the poet lTeNtoa omunnlroutvyWha,,+
for the most part avoids mak-
ing his discouragement a co'n-

SPIRITUAL. COMMUNITY OF THE SUN
PRESENTS
DICK GREGORY
* Speakinq on the food crisis and survival of humanitya*
FRI., MAY 16, 1975-7:00 P.M.
UNIV. OF MICH. BALLROOM
Donation $4 plus I can of food
profits ao to world community food bank
ann arbor. mi
GET TICKET in ADVANCE of show!
Available at David's Bookstore-529 E. Liberty
and ;n the Michigan Union

Daily Classifieds
Get Results

fw ra
... . .

:

U-M STUDENTS

The University's Enrichment Program offers
you the opportunity to take courses during
Spring Term in the Practical and Vocational
Arts at the Washtenaw Community College
Campus. This spring's course selection includes
Auto Services, Welding, Typing, Black Art,
Carpentry, Photography, etc.
The cost is $12.50 per credit hour with
the registration fee waivered for U-M
students.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
AND COURSE REGISTRATION,
CALL WCC AT 971-6311

RecyciYourBooks
(turn them back into cash)
We buy books back to offer them again at "used"prices to students
This is WHY you get the price you do for a book:
We predetermine the best price we can offer based on our ability to resell
the book in some future semester. We check for:
" usage in future courses
o past history of usage
" currentsor old edition
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask one of our buyers. If you have
any doubt about whether a book has resale value, be sure to bring it in. We feel we
have the best overall prices, but there is considerable variance among the bookstores.

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
APRIL 23-27 POWER CENTER
EVES. at 8 p.m.; SUN. MAT. at 3 p.m.
Tickets now on sale at PTP ticket office, Mendelssohn
lobby, 764-0450. Tickets also available at Hudson's at
Briorwood.

A FUTURE WORLD'S LECTURE SERIES
PRES ENTS
k* SEY OURDIMN
PRESIDENT OF NATIONAL MIGRAINE FOUNDATION
I lFEE BACK,: FAD OR THERAPY"

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan