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April 16, 1975 - Image 9

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-16

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Wednesday April 16, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

THIHGNDAL aeNn

Michigan

By TOM CAMERON 1
The Michigan baseball team
managed to split a double-head-
er yesterday in their home op-F
ener against Bowling Green.
The Wolverines were blanked in
the first game, 4-0, and took
ten innings to win the second,
5-4._
Coach Moby Benedict started
two freshman pitchers in front
of a fairly large home crowd.
"You have to start these guys
if you want them to get var-
sity experience," Benedict ex-
plained. "This is why we have
these games . .to get the
freshman in."
BENEDICT TRIED to rest
his four top pitchers for this
weekend of Big Ten games. Bill1
Stennett went the distance in
the first game despite a shaky
start and Craig McGinnis!
pitched 42%3 innings before vet-
eran Larry Soronson took over.
The first score in that sec-
ond game didn't come until the
fourth inning when Bowling
Green touched McGinnis for a
single run. The Falcon's center-
fielder Kip Young singled to
start the inning and was prompt-
ly sacrificed to second by Larry
Owen. Young was then doubled
home by left fielder Dick Selgo.
Michigan answered that run
with two of their own in the

bottom of the same inning. PeteI
Ross, who had three hits in the
second game, started the inn-1
ing with an infield single. Third
baseman Jeff James forced
him at second and Jacob Hasle-
rig followed with a walk, put-'
ting men on first and second.
Greg Lane scored James on a
line shot to center field and'
moved Haslerig to third, who
came in two pitches later on a
wild pitch to give Michigan a
2-1 edge.
THAT EDGE lasted until the
next inning. With two outs, a
walk and a single off McGinnis
brought Benedict to the mound
and Soronson out of the bull
pen. The reliever gave up an-
other walk and single which
scored two, runs and Bowling
Green took a 3-2 lead.
But the Falcons gave up that
lead in the sixth inning with two
errors. Again, Ross started the
inning off with a single. James
placed a bunt on the first base-
line that was fielded by the
pitcher who hurled it into left
field. Ross ended up on third
and James halted at second to
give Michigan two scoring
threats with no outs.
But Haslerig and Lane fol-
lowed with two infield out which
brought Ted Mahan in to pinch
hit for Jim Berra. Mahan

sp lit
grounded the ball to shortstop '
Mark Telinda who threw the 1
ball past the first baseman to I
bring both Ross and James
home.
IF THE WOLVERINES had!
held in the seventh, the fans
would have been out of the cold
air a little sooner. But the first
batter of the inning doubled
and moved to third on a single.
Soronson threw a wild pitch to
let him score and the game was
tied, 4-4.
"That is a problem," Bene-
dict emphasized. "When a pitch-!
er crosses the white line, he
has got to be mentally ready.
I guess he (Soronson) wasn't'
set yet."
After the wild toss, Soronson!

settled down and retired the
next three on strikeouts. I
Michigan won the game in the
tenth. Mark Grenkowski singled
to start the inning and moved
to second on Dick Walterhouse'sI
sacrifice. Ross then delivered
his game-winning RBI.'
Bowling Green pitcher Romiej
Schweiter stopped Michigan on!
a one hitter in the first game.
A single by Mike Parker on the
fifth inning and four scattered
walks accounted for all Wolver-
ine baserunners; only one of
which made it to second.
STENNETT LET Bowling
Green off to a big first inning
as the first three batters singled
and the fourth doubled to pro-

twi

n bill
duce three runs. The freshman
pitcher then settled down, strik-
ing out the next two batters and
getting the final out on a fly to!
right. He then kept the Falcons
in check, scattering five hits
over the rest of the game.
Bowling Green did come up'
with one run in the third,'
though, when Walterhouse's er-I
ror allowed Mike Wood to get
on base and Berra's error es-
corted him home.I
Michigan must now prepare
themselves for a weekend of
Big Ten games as they enter-
tain Iowa on Friday and Minne-
sota on Saturday. Iowa and
Minnesota were co-champs last,

Orr lands Staton-
Flowers to choose
By AL HRAPSKY
Tom Staton, a 6-3 guard and two-time all-stater from
Ferndale, signed a national letter of intent to enroll at Michi-
gan, yesterday.
Staton, who averaged 22 points, 15 rebounds, and five
assists a game, while playing all three positions last year,
was described by Michigan coach Johnny Orr as "a tre-
mendous prospect and the finest guard in the state.
"He has an excellent chance to play as a freshman,"
Orr said. "The competition at guard will be just super
next year with (Steve) Grote, (David) Baxter, (transfer
Edgar) Burch and Staton."
So far Orr and staff have signed two of the three Michi-
gan high school prospects they have tried to recruit-Staton,
and Alan Hardy from Detroit Northwestern. Today at 1:30
p.m., Bruce Flowers, the other in-state recruit, will announce
his choice at a press conference at Berkley High.r
When asked about the probable outcome of Flowers' press:
conference, Orr reluctantly commented, "I'd be surprisedr
if he did come here."

SMORGASBORD
Wednesdays 6-9 p.m.
AND
Saturdays 6-9 p.m.
1. cold viclysoisse
2. coq au vini
3. potatoes anna
4. shrimp newburgh
5. boeuf burguingnone
6. rice
7. swedIsh meat balls
8. vermicelli
9. breaded veal cutlet
10. fresh garden green
11. tarragon peas
12. eggplant parmesan
13. beef oriental
14. veal hearts
15. chicken giblets
16. cheese casserole
17. sliced beef
18. fried chicken
19. barbecued ribs
20. fried cod fish
21. black olives
22. greek olives
23, green olives
24. dill pickles
25 celery
26 carrots
27. green onions
28. crab apples
29. red peppers
30. radishes
31. corn salad
32. sliced cucumbers
with sour cream
33. sliced tomatoes
with fresh dill
34. red bean salad
35. greek bean salad
36. Italian green peppers
37. greek stuffed eggplants
38. sliced beets
39. garlic sauce
40. herring
41. portuguese sardines
42. anchovies
43. cod fish caviar mousse
44. cod fish red caviar
45 liver pate
46. sliced Jambon
47 sliced salami
48. sliced cold turkey
49. chicken salad
50.russian fish salad
51. tuna fish salad
52. cottage cheese
53. sliced mushroom in
dill sauce
54. eggrols
55. hot mustard sauce
56. stuffed eggs bonnefemme
57. coe slaw
58. cold salmon
59. fresh tuna in soyn sauce
60. butter
6. home made bread
62. sliced tongue
63. horse radish sauce
64. chicken wings japanese
65. fried squid
66. smokedspork chops
67. potato salad
68. russian salad
69. macaroni salad
70. Jelled fruit salad
71. tossed green salad
72. chef's dressing
73. french dressing
74. 1000 island dressing
75. russian dressing
76. tartar sauce
77. hot sauce
78. bacon crumbs
79 croutons
80. parmesan cheese
81. sliced onions
82 eggplant salad
83. hocktail sausage
84. hors d'oeuvres
85. stuffed grapeleaves
86. greek feta cheese
87. swiss cheese
88. cheddar cheese
89. bread pudding
90. rice pudding
91. creme caramel
92. baked apples
93. house cake
94. peaches
95. mandarin organges
96. organe sliced candies
97. bananas
98. grapes
99. apples
10. watermelon balls

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Photo by Gordon Tucker
MICHIGAN'S BILL Stennet lets a pitch fly against a Bowling Green batter in yesterday's ac-
tion. Although Stennet gave up only five hits he was tagged with a 4-0 loss. The Wolverines
came back in. the second game though with a 5-4 win.
ABA CHAMPS-OUSTE-
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' By The Associated Press
UNIONDALE, N.Y. - Freddie
Lewis' 20-foot jump shot with
three seconds remaining, car-
ried the underdog Spirits of St.
Louis to a 108-107 victory over
the defending champion NewI
York Nets last night in the
American Basketball Associa-
tion playoffs.
Qt4 T .iic' fntirthr nncarttivy

IDailv
NIGHT EDITOR:
JOHN CHAVEZ

sr. 1.ous rourtn consecuive
e victory, after an opening gamer
loss in the best-of-seven series,
1 moved the Spirits into the East-'
S C O R E S j ern Division finals against the
Kentucky Colanels.
ABA PLAYOFFS THE DIMINUTIVE LEWIS,
St. Louis 108, New York 107 who finished with 29 points,
St. Louis wins series 4-1 scored St. Louis' last 10. His
NHL PLAYOFFS three point field goal with 1:51
Pittsburgh 3, New York Islanders 1 remaining brought the Spirits
Pittsburgh leads series 2-0 within two points at 103-101.
Buffalo 3, Chicago 1'Twnyoesc dsltr
Buffalo leads series 2-0 Twenty-one s e c o n d s later,
Philadelphia 3, Toronto 0 Lewis' three point play put the
Philadelphia leads series 2-0 Spirits ahead for the first time
Vancouver 2, Montreal 1 in the game 104-103. After four
series tied at 1-1 consecutive points by the Nets,"
WHA PLAYOFFS Lewis sank two free throws to+

cut New York's lead to 107-106.,
Then, after the usually reli-
able Julius Erving, who was
named the ABA's player of the
year yesterday, lost the ball on
a backcourt violation, setting
up Lewis' winning field goal.
"THE GAME and the seasonI
ended in tremendous disappoint-
ment," said Kevin Loughery,
the glum New York coach.
"We should have won, ' said
Dave DeBusschere, in his tirstI
season as the Net's generalj
manager. "This was a real
crusher."
The Nets, who led by 14 pmts
at the half, were paced by Er-:
ving with 34 points. John Will-
iamson came off the bench to
score 22 points and Larry Kenon
added 17.

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M i k e B a r r contributed 20'
points for St. Louis, while Mar-
vin Barnes, who had averaged
34 points in the first four games,
added 17.

',

Houston 7, Cleveland 2
Houston leads series 3-I.
New England 5, Minnesota 2
Series tied at 2-2
BASEBALL
\ AMERICAN LEAGUE
Boston 5, New York 3
California 7, Minnesota 3
Texas 6, Chicago 5, 13 innings
Milwaukee 7, Baltimore 1
Kansas City 4, Oakland 3
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Atlanta 6, Houston 1
New York at Philadelphia,
ppd., rain
Chicago at Pittsburgh, ppd., rain
Los Angeles 3, Cincinnati 1

__.

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FOREIGN TEACHERS and STUDENTS

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AP Photo
FREDDIE LEWIS of the ABA's St. Louis Spirits, drives
against the New York Net's Billy Paultz (right) and Brian
Taylor (14) in the playoffs last night. Lewis' heroics in the
end gave the Spirits the victory, 108-107.
VICTOR SJOSTROM'S 1924
HE WHO GETS SLAPPED
(AT 7)
Lon Chane Sr. plays a brilliant scientist who,
cheated of his discoveries, becomes a circus
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