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April 16, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WE

Wednesday, April 16, 1975

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

CLOBBER HILLSDALE:
SHARDI Womeni
The new book by Richard Adams, author
of WATERSH IP DOWN" is here. By MARCIA KATZ 1 as devastating. Czarne
. .The women's tennis team did Karzen teamed to take t
For a limited time you can buy BOTH t)not want to stay out any longer doubles match, 6-1, 6-1.
"SH ARD DI K" & "WATE RSH 1 P DOWN" than they had to in the cold Second doubles, Polli
weather yesterday as they Wilson, and, third doubl
for $13.90-a savings of $3.00 at downed the Hillsdale women in fey and Zaharoff, defeat
less than two hours. opponents by identical
Fresh from their tight match | scores. C
me COwith Kalamazoo on Monday, n Coach Carmen Br
which Michigan won 5-4, the now looks to the team
3Hillsdale team was no match a with Wisconsi
336 MAYNARD for the Wolverines. Sunday, and intimate
r~ Michigan swept both singles all practice from nowt
and doubles in straight sets be for the Big Ten Cha
-- - -- as only one Hillsdale players

tetters rom

cki and
the first
ick and
es, Laf-
ed their
6-0, 6-0
ummet
's next
n this
d that
on will
mpion-

ships April 25-26 at Wisconsin.
"The match with Wisconsin
should be excellent competition
for us," said Brummet.
A major problem for the team
has been with the weather. They
have been practicing indoors,
but the courts are much slower
than the outdoor conditions.
Brummet felt her players,
must become more consistent
with their serve and serve
returns. Another part of the
game they plan to work on1

is tie-breakers, when the set
is deadlocked at six games
a piece.
"We had three tie-breakers
with Kalamazoo and lost all of
them," commented Brummet.
Brummet cannot predict how
Michigan will do in the Big Ten
Championships, but feels they
are a team to be taken serious-
ly. She said MSU, OSU, Wiscon-
sin, Indiana and Michigan
should all be strong in the
tournament.

1975 summer program of goddard college
ALTERNATE ENERGY
AND
AGRICU LTURE
June 2-August22 15 credits
An intensive 12 week program in
social ecology and environmental
sciences, exploring alternative
technologies, a no-growth
economy, organic agriculture,
urban decentralization, the politics
of ecology, and the design and
construction of experimental
modelsforwind, solar, and
methane-powered energy
production.

could manage to win two
games in a set.
In the first singles match
Diane Czarnecki defeatedmDeb-
bie Davis, 6-1, 6-0. Czarnecki's
cross court volleys and short
drop shots were too much for
Davis to handle.
Jan Karzen took s e c o n d
singles 6-1, 6-0, Janet Wilson
third singles, 6-1, 6-2, Annette
Zaharoff fourth singles 6-1, 6-1,
Missy Pollick fifth singles, 6-1,
6-0, while Andy Laffey cleaned
up at sixth singles, 6-0, 6-0.
The doubles wins were just

Blue bowlers stumble
"
in Big Ten tournament
By AL E. KATZ I nament. Wharton explained thatI for 13th place.

Strikes and spares are the
name of the game, but for
Michigan, splits dominated the
action this past weekend in the
26th annual Big Ten Bowling

Goodard is located in a rural
Vermont community, rich in both
natural and human resources, in a
state noted for its progressive
environmental legislation.
The summer program is directed by
MURRAY BOOKCIN, author of Post
Scarcity Anarchism, Our Synthetic
Environment, and Limits of the
City. Visiting Faculty will include
outstanding national experts in the
fields of alternate technology and
communities such as KARL HESS,
Community Technologies, SAM
LOVE, Environmental Action,
JOHN and NANCY TODD, founders
New Alchemy institute, WILSON
CLARK, author of Energy for
Survival, STEVE BAER,
Zomeworks, JOHN
SHUTTLEWORTH, publisher of
Mother Earth News, ROBERT
REINES, Integrated Life Support
Systems Labs, and STEWART
BRAND, publisher of The Whole
Earth Catalog.

Fordetailed
illustrated brochure
write:
D. Chodorkoff
Social Ecology Program
Goddard College moSE4
Plainfield, Vermont 05667

Championships at East Lansing.
The best finish for the Michi-
First Singles - Diane Czarnecki gan men came in the doubles
(M) def. D~ebbie Davis (H), 6-1, 6-0.,
Second Singles - Jan Karzen (M) as Rich Grossman and Brooke
def Wendy Watkins (H), 6-1, 6-0. Strang teamed for 1164. They#
Third Singles -Janet Wilson (M) finished only 18 pins behind the'
def. .Iainie Evans (H), 6-1, 6-2. frtlc icni embt
Fourth Singles - Annette Zahar- first place Wisconsin team but
off (M) def. Beth Balas (H), 6-1, 6-1. once again the old nemesis of
Fifth Singles - Missy Poliek (M) the split was the difference.
def. Mary Beth Vitale (H), 6-1, 6-0.I
Sixth Singles - Andy Laffey (M)
def. Janet Grimm (H), 6-0, 6-0. IN THE THIRD game of dou-
First Doubles - Czarnecki, Kar- bles, Grossman, who rolled 587:
ien (M) def. Watkins, Evans (H), for the series, had all hopes of!
second Doubles - Pollick, Wilson first place vanish when he
(M) def. Balas, Faith London (H), came up with a big split to stopt
6-0. 6-0.! his string of five strikes in a
Third Doubles - Laffey, Zaharoffi
(M) def. Lee Olton, Lisa Shippe (I), row. Strang totaled 577 for his'
6-0, 6-0. series.c
Michigan should have realiz-
ed this was not going to be theirf
Economics on a tournament from the opening
Human Scale I ceremonies. Michigan Statel
University President, Dr. Clif-x
by ton Wharton was asked to throwE
down the first ball of the tour-'

B E S I D E S GROSSMAN men's title as they pulled down
and Strang, Michigan sent Paul first place with a total score of
Baker, Bob Savage, Craig 7452, their team averaging over
Drozdowicz and Curt Smith as 165 per bowler. The Michigan
the sixth man. The sixth man's women could manage only a
score was used in singles and 6171 total.
doubles competition, but did not Going into the final three
count in the team's total pin games Minnesota trailed Indi-
score. ana by 30 pins, but erupted for a
rn the men's all events team big series. The Gophers finished
score Michigan finished fourth 1140 pins ahead of second place
with a total of 7888. Iowa placed MSU, while the Hoosiers finish-
first with a 8226 total pin fall. ed a close third.
On individual scoring, Gross-
man's nine game total of 1630 THE BEST FINISH for the
placed him 11th in the men's all women was in the individual
events. The next best Michigan all events as Marcia Katz plac-
"score was Baker's 1622, good ed 12th with a nine game score

I
I
I
i
I ,

he had never bowled before,
was told to just throw it at the
pins. "Dick Weber" Wharton
demolished all ten pins to get
the tournament off to a flying
start.
The Wolverine bowlers quali-
fied for this tournament the
week of March 15 at the Michi-
gan Jnion. The top six men and
women were eligible.

Photo by Gordon Tucker
DIANE CZARNECKI attempts a serve against her Hillsdale
opponent Debbie Davis yesterday. Czarnecki handled Davis
6-1, 6-0 and Michigan blanked Hillsdale 9-0.
I Sor2ts of ]i'he Daily

FOR THE WOMEN, even
some delectable banana bread
to munch on between frames
could not save them from finish-
ing last in the team event.
The women's team consisted
of Marcia Katz, Debbie Mar-
shall, Ruth Zimmerman, Peggy
Simon, Cheryl Franks and Julie
Brownell as the sixth bowler.
Minnesota captured the wo-

AVN IM EN DAVIDVAL
Thursday, April 17
7:30
Kleine Lounge,
Alice Lloyd

\11"

-.I

% -0

r

IN CONJUNCTION WITH SOLIDARITY DAY
Prof. Saul Friedman
OF YOUNGSTOWN STATE UNIVERSITYl
WILL SPEAK ON:
"The Jews of Syria,
A Study of Arab Toleration'
2:30 APRIL 16th
in the HENDERSON ROOM off
the Michigan League, 3rd floor
A Teach-in: sponsored bv: THE ISRAELI STUDENTS
ORGANIZATION and H ILLEL

t---

LS & A STUDENT GOVERNMENT,
Is Holding It's Election
FRIDAY, APRIL 18
LS & A Student Government publishes the Disorientation
Booklet for incoming freshpeople, appoints students to Col-
lege committees, administers funds and acts as an advocate
for LS & A students.
This year the LS & A Student Government was a moving
force working against the proposed dorm rent rate hike. The
success of this effort saved students hundreds of thousands
of dollars. The LS & A Student Government has acted to
protect less conventional educational programs such as
Pilot Program, Course Mart, and Independent Study.
Vote to Maintain a Strong College Government
VOTE APRIL 18

of 1474. She then teamed with
Debbie Marshall in the doubles
to finish in 13th place with a
911 total.
Despite Michigan's perform-
ance in this tournament, no
complaints could be made about
the condition of the bowling
lanes. The MSU lanes were
freshly oiled before each day
of the tournament. Unfortunate-
ly this seemed to give the Blue
some ploblems. Practicing at
the Michigan Union left the
bowlers unaccustomed to the
slick-non breaking lanes in East
Lansing. It took awhile for the
Maize and Blue keglegs to get
adjusted to the alleys.
No matter how good or bad
anyone bowled, all benefited
from the bowling banquet held
Saturday night. Awards and tro-
phies were given out between
a dinner of roast beef, potatoes
and salad.
Next year's tournament will
be hosted by Wisconsin. Until
then a replacement for banana
bread and coke will have to be
found.

New Aspects of
ELECTRONIC SOUNDS
Quadraphonic, Dance, Live Performance, Film
SPONSORED BY THE ELECTRONIC MUSIC STUDIO
GUEST Thomas Warburton, piano
ARTISTS: William Moersch, percussion
Tom Palazzolo, cinematography
Diane Eilber, choreography
Friday, April 18-8 p.m.
Rackham Auditorium
Phil Winsor Theorist Room
Loretta Jankowski StrephanadeC
Phil Smily Kolyosa
Byron Tate Exegesis
Karlheinz Stockhausen Kontakte for electronic
sounds, percussion & tape
William Moersch, percussion
Thomas Warburton, piano
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC FREE OF CHARGE

Dr. J named MVP
ST. LOUIS-Julius Erving of the New York Nets was named
the Amerian Basketball Association's player of the year yester-
day in a poll of ABA players conducted by the Sporting News.
Erving, according to the publication, outpolled the Indiana
Pacers' George McGinnis for the honor in balloting for an
all-ABA team.
Others on the team with Erving and McGinnis, both for-
wards, are center Artis Gilmore of Kentucky and guards Mack
Calvin of Denver and Ron Boone of Utah.
-AP
WFL tries for.Namath
NEW YORK-The World Football League, on the eve of its
planned coming-out party, revealed last night that it has offered
Joe Namath a long-term 4 million-dollar contract to play for the
next three years.
League president Chris Hemmeter said the offer called for
a $500,000 bonus, $500,000 a year for three years and $100,000
a year for 20. years, beginning in 1978.
In addition, the WFL said it offered Namath 50 per cent
ownership in a future expansion franchise-one which sources
said would be located in New York, the city Namath captured
a decade ago when he gave respectability to another struggling
league.
There was no immediate reaction from Namath, who is under
contract to the Jets until May 1.
-AP
Double fault
The Michigan men's'tennis meets against EMU tomorrow
and Northwestern Friday will begin at 2:30 instead of 1 p.m., as
previously publicized. All Saturday matches will start at 1 p.m.
though according to Will Perry, Sports Information Director.

USED BOOK
SALE
UNION
Assembly Hall
THURSDAY: Noon-Nine
FRIDAY: Nine-Noon

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I
I

PA

FereAshler
course.

1 l

Protest Oppression of Minorities
Under Arab Rule
SOLIDARITY DAY
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16
Noon on the Diag
SPONSORED BY:
Committee for Oppressed
Minorities Under Arab Rule
American Kurdish Society
Committee for Oppressed Jewry at Hillel

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iff v i'r4tgtn Buily
OFFICE HOURS
CIRCULATION - 764-0558
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