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April 15, 1975 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-15

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Tuesday, April 15, 1975

TH E M 1 C; ! ""_71A ' : ^A ! L - Y

rage Three

i

,. _.!A~ %IL ae he

News Briefs
From Wire Service Reports
Sadat selects aide
CAIRO (Reuter)-Egyptian President Anwar Sadat yesterday.
chose his 55-year-old interior minister, Mamdouh Salem, as
Egypt's new prime minister and promised drastic changes to
improve the country's economic situation.
But in a much publicized address to the Egyptian people, he
rave no details of the steps he would take.
Sadat, who is planning a major shake-up of his cabinet this
week in consultation with Salem, said, "I do not want a change
of faces but a change of attitude and policies."
The'new team is expected to be announced tomorrow.
Salem, a former policeman and a staunch Sadat loyalist, was
brought into the government as interior minister in 1971 following
an unsuccessful coup against President Sadat, he has been deputy
premier since 1973.
Connally denies taking bribe
WASHINGTON (MP)-Former Treasury Secretary John- Con-
nally denied emphatically and categorically yesterday that he
ever took a payoff for helping get an increase in milk price
supports. "It did not," said Connally to the question of whether
such a bribe ever took place.
Connally's chief accuser, Jake Jacobsen, has testified that
the three-time Texas governor asked him for money in return for
help in getting the price supports hiked in 1971.
Asked by defense lawyer Edward Bennett Williams if he had
ever asked for money, Connally said: "I did not."
The defense opened its case, after being denied a directed,
verdict of acquittal, by presenting a stellar cast of character1
witnesses including the Rev. Billy Graham and former First
Lady Lady Bird Johnson..
The character witnesses also included two Cabinet members
from the Kennedy and Johnson administrations and Rep. Barbara
Jordan, a black congresswoman from Houston where Connally
now lives.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
'CJs V V,...i. .i:. .. w v vi :"";:.":{7".{;:"'?:::"':"Y:":" .;o.;.

Govt. predicts few summer
-ob openings for students

AP Photo
KAREN GALLOWAY and Jerry Paul, Joann e Little's attorneys, appear at the Beaufort
County Courthouse in North Carolina yesterday t o argue that nurder charges against Little be,
dropped.

By The Associated Press
Finding a summer job will be'
tougher than ever this year for
the millions of high school and
college students seeking extra
money from vacation employ-
ment.
Government and private an-
alysts predict more than five
million persons between the
ages of 14 and 21 will be look-
ing for work this summer. No
one knows how many jobs will
be available.
ESTIMATES of the situation
range from "not particularly
good" to "real grim."
There are opportunities avail-I
able, but many of the jobs have
strings attached: would-be em-
ployes need particular skills;
they must be willing to start
work early; they should be
ready to accept low-paying posi-
tions performing manual labor.
The always-tight summer job
market has been further con-
stricted this year by the prob-
lems of the economy.
HIGH unemployment means
adult workers will be competing
with youngsters for many jobs;
so will retired people who need
extra income. At the same time,
inflation has boosted the cost of
education, meaning more stu-
dents will be' trying to add to
college funds. Also, recession
has caused industry to cut back
and get along with fewer em-
ployes.
The New York City office of
the State Employment Services
found camp jobs for 150 to 200
youngsters last year. Asked how
~many the agency would be able
to place this year, a spokesman
said: "I'd hate to guess."
The spokesman said many
camps have gone out of business
because of the recession, al-
though he was unable to give
specifics. He said students with
specialized experience-in the
arts and crafts field or sports,
for example-will stand the best
chance of getting jobs.
THE COLORADO State Em-
ployment Service said the com-
petition for resort and park jobs
has been increasing for the past
two years and 1975 is even
worse. Recruiters who usually
contact the office in February
or March have not called. Re-
sort operators don't know wheth-
er the tourists will core this
ty I+I il1I

year.
"It's real grim," a spokesman
said, adding that applicants
should be ready to accept
menial-type jobs like cabin maid
or bus boy.
Similar work is available in
the resorts around Cape Cod,
but a Chamber of Commerce
spokesman said the competition
is tough this year. Retired
people on fixed incomes are
taking some of the jobs, the
spokesman said, adding that
students who want work will
have to be prepared to start
early and continue well into the
fall.
MANY placement officers are
advising students to settle for
less than they would have a
few years ago. "Job hunting is
going to be extremely difficult
this summer," said Bradlee
Howe, director of the Harvard
Student Employment Office.
"Kids are going to find jobs, but
there's going to be less money
and a lot fewer interesting op-
portunities."

a

I

Edward Esse of the Roches-
ter, N.Y., office of the State
Labor Department, is more pes-
simistic. "It's going to be pa-
thetic for the kids this year,"
he said.
Figuring out how many stu-
dents will not be able to find
jobs this summer is impossible.
ANYONE who is over 16, out
of work and looking for a job
is counted among the nation's
unemployed for the purpose of
computing Labor Department
statistics. These figures are
seasonally adjusted so that the
large number of youngsters en-
tering the work force each
spring and dropping out again
in the fall won't distort the
over-all picture.
Even after the adjustments,
however, the unemployment rate
among teen-agers is much high-
er than that among the general
population. Last July, for ex-
ample, the over-all unemploy-
ment rate was 5.3 per cent; the
unemployment rate among teen-
agers was 16.2 per cent.

Lawy ers for

Little

move

to

block trial

Tuesday, April 15
Day Calendar
WUOM: Wm. Buckley, Perry Bul-
lard, & Zolton Ferency debatelocal
& nat'l issues Ronald Trowbridge,
moderator, ed., Michigan Academi-
clan, 9:40 am.
Medical Ctr. Commission for Wo-
men: 03086 Outpatient, noon.
Maternal, Child Health Films:
What Are Doing to Our Children?1
M1112 SPH II, noon.
Baseball: UM vs. Bowling Green
(2), Fisher Field, 2 pm.
Women's Tennis: UM vs. Hillsdale,
Varsity Court, 3 pm.
Environmental Studies: "Popula-
tion in the Less Developed Coun-
tries: Societal Solutions," 4001 CC
Little, 3 pm.
Great Lakes Research: Kent Fan-
ning, U. S. Fla., "Deep-sea Sedi-
ments and the Chemical Stabiltiy
of the Oceans," White Aud., Cooley
Lab, 4 -pm.
Low Energy Colloquium: Mark
Slutsky, "Some Interesting Direc-
tions in Light-Beaming Spectro-
scopy," 2038 Randall Lab, 4 pm.
Theoretical Seminar : D. 0. Riska,
MSU, "Field Theoretical Calculation
of the Nucleon-Nucleon Interae-
tion," 1041 Randall Lab, 4 pm.
Statistics: Kong-Gee Chong, "On
Sufficiency and the Likelihood
Principle," 3033 Angel, 4 pm.
*English, Ext. Service: Donald Hall,
poetry reading, Aud. 3, MLB, 4:10
pm.
Residential College: Mary Ed-
wards, ,Contemporary Feminist Fic-
tion," Greene Lounge, E. Quad, 7
pm.
Psychiatry: B. H. Snyder, Johns
Hopkins U., "Dgs. Neurotranmit-
ters, and Schizophrenia,"' Aud.,
CPH, 8 pm.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
volume LXXXV, No. 156
Tuesday, April 15, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a I I8 Tuesdaythrougb
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $8.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (Other states and foreign).
"personalized and distinctive"
JERRY ERICKSON
BILL
STEVE DUR1S
r4 ad-an iur
BARBER SHOP
HOURS:
Tues.-Sat.: 8-30-5:30
Wed.: 11:00-8:00
806 South State Street
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Phone: 668-8669

Music School: Wind dpt. student
recital -- Recital Hall, 12:30 pm;
Philharmonia, Hill Aud., 8 pm; de-
gree recitals - Tony Cecere, french
horn, Recital Hall, 8 pm; Chas.
Brown, bass, Cady Music Rm.,
Staerns, 8 pm.
Art Museum Week: Piano cham-
ber music, Art Museum, 8 pm.
Summer Placement
3200 SAB, 763-4117
Register in person or by Phone.
Camp Tangua, MI. Coed: Inter-
view Fri., Apr, 18 1-5; openings ic.
specialists in water ski, riding e/w,
arts & crafts, doctor-couple accept-
able; further details available.
S.G.F. Vacation Camp, PA Boys:
Interview Mon. Apr. 21, part of
morning & afternoon; waterfront
dir.; further details available.
Camp Ararat, MI Coed: openings,
waterfront (21, m/f), cook, gen.
counselors 21, riflery, health direc-
tor and/or nurse, details available-
send resume.
Watervliet, MI. Coed: opening,
sailing inst. (19 up); details avail-
able.
Camp Ma-H -Ya-MI Coed; Jew-
ish~omin. Ctr. of Toledo: Interview
Thurs., April 17, 9-5, openings incl.
nurse, maintenance help (m; 18
up), asst. waterfront, sr. counselors
(20 up), asst. cook (20 up); regis-
ter in person or by phone, 763-4117.
MEXICO VACATION
Less than $2.50 each per day!
Special Student summer rates,
May 1 thru Oct. 30. Share
completely furnished Pacific
Beach front houses. Pool, fish-
ing, diving ,etc. Write NOW-
AIR MAIL for info. or reser-
vations. English spoken.
BUNGALOS LAS PALMAS,
BARRA De NAVIDAD, JALIS-
CO, MEXICO. Phone No. 17.

WASHINGTON, N.C. (R) -At-
torneys for Joanne Littlea
black woman inmate accused
of killing a white jailer she said
was trying to rape her, argued
for dismissal of charges yester-
day on grounds that the juryj
selection process in Beaufort
County excludes blacks.
Little's attorneys said at a
pretrial hearing that the grand
jury which indicted her for first-
degree murder was defective
because blacks are excluded
from serving in this eastern
North Carolina county where
whites are in the majority.
LITTLE. 20, is accused of kill-
ing Clarence Alligood, 62, last,
Au. 27 while she was an inmate
at the Beaufort County Jail. She
maintains that Alligood was try-
ing to rave her and that she
killd him in self-defense.
She fled the iail after thej
slaving bit turned herself in to
authorities eight, days later.
Ciidlrights and women's:
riehts orgeninations have called
attention to Little's case as one
in which a woman's right to de-
fend herself against attackers
may be tested.
THE SUPERTOR Court cham-
ber was virtually empty yester-
day as the pretrial hearing be-s
ban, bUt a number of black
snectators appeared later in the
session, and during midday re-
cess some 150 demonstrators
gathered on the steps of the
courthouse.
"One, two, three. Joanne must
be set free," they chanted.
Larry Little, no relation to
Little, who said he is political
affairs coordinator for the Win-
ston-Salem chapter of the Black
Panther party, served as spokes-
man for the demonstrators.
"We realize that if Joanne

Little had been a white woman,
she would never have been in-
dicted. She would have been
given a medal of honor if she
had killed a black man," he
said.
LITTLE was not present for
the hearing or the demonstra-
tion. Released on bond more
than a month ago, she has been
in seclusion except for a brief
appearance in Winston-Salem at
a Black Panther rally on April
3.
Defense attorneys Jerry Paul
and Karen Galloway have sub-
mitted 18 motions to presiding
Judge Henry McKinnon, includ-
ing one calling for a change of
site for the trial. McKinnon met
for more than an hour in his

chambers yesterday with Paul,
Galloway and prosecutor Wil-
liam Griffin to establish priori-
ties for hearing the motions,. Mc-
Kinnon indicated the hearing
would take several days.
Carolyn Taylor, secretary of
the Beaufort County Board of
Elections, was the first witness
called by Paul, who questioned
her about the ratio of blacks and
whites among the county's regis-
tered voters. The registration
lists are used in the selection of
names for prospective grand
jurors.
Taylor testified that Beaufort
has 12,695 whites and 2,950
blacks registered to vote. Un-
official sources say the white-
black ratio for the county's
population is approximately 60-
40.

ATTENTION!
AEP~i
KOSHER CO-ED FRAT
STILL HAS SPACE FOR
5 MORE
WOMEN or MEN
"check out AEPi"
1620 CAMBRIDGE
Call Sue, Ron or Dave
665-7668

I

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r

J

PRE-MEDS
"Everything you've always wanted to
know about medical school admis-
sions, but didn't know who to ask"
Speaker-DR. ROBERT GREEN
Assoc. Dean of the U of M Medical School
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16 -8:00 P.M.
at HILLEL --1429 Hill Street

this Summer
Trinity College/Rome Campus
$895:
ncludes
Tuition,
room & board.
excursions,
+ ~all books,
art mater als
t ,4
June 14 -"July 21
Anthropology * Renaissance Art
Paintinaing, and Design
Italian Language " Roman Art
and Archeology
TRINITY COLLEGE/ROME CAMPUS
Hartford, Conn. 06106
(203)527-3153 ext. 221

TUES.-THURS. at I Y p.m.
WED. at 1-3-5-7-9 p.m.
9th HIT WEEK
-From the deep dark re-
cesses of the mind of Mel
Brooks comes
YOUNG PG
FRAN KENSTEI N

TUES.-THUR. at 7 & 9 p.m.
WED. at 1-3-5-7-9 p.m.
"Ivory's first American
film displays a sheer pre-
cocious I o ye for what
movies can say' that I
haven't se e on since the
early New Wave ..-
--Rolling Stone
"A strange and beautiful
film - surreal 'G r e a t
Gatsby:'"
-San.Franci'sco Examiner
"Lyrical direction . .
lush and delicate photog-
raphy."
--The New York Times

I

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Looking for an Educational Summer
Experience Working with
HandicappedChildren?
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
FRESH AIR CAMP
Still has Counselor openings
Applications are available in Room 2010M
School of Education Bldg. or call for informa-
tion: 764-6364.
Also a Truck Driver Position is Available

WED. at 1a-3-5-7-9 p.m.
PG

Roted R
""""""""'"

FM

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The/VVisual Library
Unique paperbound books identical in every way
to theirhardcover originals.
Handm1aelHou ses "
A Guide to the
Woodbutcher'sArt
Art Boericke/ Barry Shapiro
Inspiring graphic and>
textual homage to the.
people who got it all
together-time, energy,.
land, and materials-to
build something of their
very own.
"Perhaps the most beauti- S
ful architecture book in
--Boston Sunday Globe
113 color photographs $5.95 D < *:;
A&W Visual Library
95 Madison Avenue
New York, N.Y.10016s
Probably the most beautiful
paperbacks you've ever seen.

I

SHERRY HOUR
LONDON SUMMER PROGRAM
April 17 at 5:00 p.m.
MARC Lounge (Law Quad N-Cook Room)
For information on the Michigan-Sarah Lawrence Summer Program in
London, July 4 to August 15.
Courses on theatre, novel, and history for Michigan credit.
Anyone interested in meeting with faculty members and past students
in this program-is invited to attend. If you cannot attend and are in-
terested, stop by the:
)FFICE OF STUDY ABROAD OR contact:
1413 Mason Hall Prof. N. Steneck
Phone: 763-2053 Phone: 769-1760

I

TENSION ANXIETY
WORKSHOP
A workshop teachinq self-control of tension and anxiety
such as associated with "nervousness," muscle cramps,
excess smokinq, and eatinq, insomnia, tension headaches,
fears, phobias, and social uneasiness. Led by Behavior
Science Service Staff including a member of the University
faculty.
PROGRESSIVE RELAXATION TRAINING: a
self-contained training package in deep muscle
relaxation.
ELECTRONIC BIOFEEDBACK: Use of EMG
monitor to actually hear and see signals from
your muscles.
ASSERTION TRAINING: Behavior techniques
designed to lend greater control over one's self
and the environment.
A COMPARISON of these techniques with
methods from RATIONAL EMOTIVE THER-
APY and TRANSACTIONAL ANALYSIS.
SUNDAY. APRIL 20-1-5 D.m.

0

UNIVERSITE de PARIS-SORBONNE-COURS de CIVILISATION FRANCAISE
SORBONNE SUMMER SESSION for
FOREIGN TEACHERS and STUDENTS

The LS&A Student Government
wishes to express its great dissatisaction with recent
policy decisions concerning INDEPENDENT STUDY/
DIRECTED READING and EXPERIENTIAL WORK ap-
proved by the LS&A curriculum committee.
We urge all students and faculty interested in inde-

DATES: JULY
Requirement: 2 years college French
I. ALL LEVELS
(Junior to Graduate)
Grammar-Phonetics-
Composition
111. GRADUATE COURSES
Styl istics-Linguistics-Creative
Writing-Literature (17th-20th
century) -Contemporary
French Drama-French Art-
Contemporary History

3 - AUGUST 13
Courses: 30 hrs. each (=2 credits)
11. SENIOR COURSES
French Literature (17th-20th)
French Art (17th-present)
French Civilization (revolution-
present)
IV. GRADUATE SEMINARS

on:
Contemporary Literature,
Politics, History, etc.
("L'univers des choses dans le
theatre de I'absurde", "Role de
la France dans les relations
.....-". ..n n rD n cnrlh

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