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April 12, 1975 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-12

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Saturday, April 12, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

News Briefs
From Wire Service Reports"
Hearst comments on Scotts
SAN FRANCISCO (A) - Randolph Hearst said yesterday he
believes that whatever sports radical Jack Scott and his wife
Micki "may have done" for his fugitive daughter Patricia "was
done for her safety."
But Hearst emphasized that he had "absolutely no knowledge"
of any help the Scotts may have given his 21-year-old daughter.
THE SCOTTS, who were in hiding five weeks after reports
that they might have helped Miss Hearst, surfaced this week to
pledge noncooperation with the FBI and said the hunt for the
fugitive heiress was being used to harass liberals.
Hearst, president and editor of the San Francisco Examiner,
said in a statement released through the newspaper:
"While I do not necessarily agree with Mr. and Mrs. Scott's
political philosophy, I have no reason to believe them to be other
than nonviolent, sincere people."
Beef controversy brews
New government standards for grading beef take effect Mon-
day amid a continuing controversy over whether consumers will
be paying more for lower quality meat.
THE U. S. Department of Agriculture says no. The depart-
ment also says you won't notice any difference in the taste of the
beef you buy.
Consumer groups disagree, arguing that Americans will, in
effect, be paying choice prices for beef that previously was listed
under the lower grade of good.
The changes affect the amount of grain that must be fed to
cattle of a particular age. Cattlemen generally favor the new
regulations since they will be able to save money by feeding
their livestock less of the increasingly expensive grain without
having the beef graded at a lower level.
Oil companies investigated
WASHINGTON, (Reuter) - Exxon and Mobil are among two
dozen oil companies whose records of fuel imports are being in-
vestigated in a federal search for price frauds, Congress was told
yesterday.
THE COMPANIES were mentioned at a congressional hearing
into allegations that the Federal Energy Administration (FEA)
for months refused to cooperate in criminal probes for possible
price frauds.

Soviets visit Israel
to discuss Mideast

II

JERUSALEM (Reuter) -Two
Soviet emissaries recently visit-
ed Israel to discuss Middle East
peace moves and improving re-
lations between the two coun-
tries, two Israeli newspapers re-
ported yesterday.
Thenewspaper Haaretz said
the Soviet visitors, who were
"close to government circles,"
held talks with Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin and foreign min-
ister Yigal Allon.
THE FOREIGN minister later
issued a statement saying, "Is-
rael will not react to reports as
whether contacts did, or did not,
take place with the Soviet Union
or with other countries with
which Israel has no diplomatic
relations."
Some experienced observers
here saw this as more of a con-
firmation than a denial.
Later, Israeli health minister
Victor Shem-Tov said there
might be some truth to the re-
ports but he could not confirm
them.
TALKING to reporters during
a tour of the Israeli - Arab vil-
lage of Baqa El Gharbiya, north
of here, the minister said: "I
cannot confirm the reports .. .
but there may be some sub-
stance to them."
Mr. Shem-Tov said the recent
failure of Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger's peace initia-
tive compelled Israel to review
its own policies and investigate
the possibilities of normalizing

relations with the Soviet Union.
"We must remember that the
state of Israel was established
throuah the support of the two
super-powers, and we must
strive to achieve the same bal-
ance in our relations," he said.
HA AR ETZ reported that the1
emissaries said the Soviet Un-
ion was prepared toresume
normal relations if Israel with-
drew to its 1967 borders. The
Soviet Union would be prepar-
ed to offer guarantees of Isra-
el's security within those bor-
ders.
The Soviet Union broke off
diplomatic relations with Israel
at the time of the 1967 war.
The mass-circulation newspa-
per Maaril said Israel had re-
cently asked several European
s t a t e s, including Britaih,
France, West Germany and Hol-
land, to approach the Soviet Un-
ion with proposals for renewing
a dialogue.
THE MICHIGAN DAIlS
Volume LXXXV, No. 154
Saturday, April 12, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the'University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor. Michigan 48106.
Published d a i I y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Ujniver-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street. Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mall (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).

ATTENTION FOOSERS !
YPSI, The Foosball capital
of Mid-America, rresents its:
ANNUAL FOOSBALL TOURNAMENT
APRIL 20, 1975
DOUBLES: 1st Prize $100.00; 2nd Prize $50.00
SINGLES: 1st Prize $50.00
EARLY ENTRY-$2.00 (by April 15);
LATE ENTRY-$3.00 (by April 18)
525 CROSS STREET, YPSILANTI
FLIPPER McGEES
3 blocks from the watertower
27 YOM HA'ATZMAUT
ISRAEL
INDEPENDENCE DAY
CELEBRATION
with
Moti Giladi The Luyehi
TO? ISRAELI PERFORMER DANCE TROUPE
MONDAY, APRIL 14
at the Michigan Union Ballroom
7:00-INFORMATIONAL PROGRAMS on all
aspects of Israeli Life.
8:00-YOM HAZIKRON-Memorial for those
who have fallen in defense of Israel.
Followed by THE PERFORMANCE
-ADMISSION FREE-
Sponsored by H ILLEL and the
ISRAELI STUDENT ORGANIZATION

AP Photo
MS. WILLIAM REIS of Janesville, Wisconsin and her newly-
adopted Vietnamese son Robbie get acquainted. Mr. and Ms.
Reis believe Robbie was one of the survivors of the crash
of the orphan airlift plane near Saigon this week.

BOTH SIDES TO BENE

FIT ;

UNICEF pleads for
funds for orphans
UNITED NATIONS, N. Y. (R') in Vietnam and the com
- While Washington debates has had a number of lette
further military support of calls expressing specific
South Vietnam, the American est in aid to children in th
people are going to be asked to munist - controlled areas
dig into their own pockets to Regardless of the p
help millions of children on both outcome and aside fro
sides of the conflict, question of how many o
The American Committee for might be adopted abro.
UNICEF, the U. N. Children's said, "There are still at
Fund, will launch a major fund- million children in Vietna
raising campaign this weekend Cambodia in need of tend
to provide food, medical sup- ing care and material tl
plies, clothing and shelter to "THIS is where UNIC
mothers and children in need able to put its effort, bec
in both Saigon and Communist- has established contact
ruled parts of Vietnam as well people on all sides in th
as Cambodia and Laos, C. Lloyd rible conflict and gainer
Bailey, the committee's execu- confidence," Bailey said.
tive director, told a reporter. UNICEF has been op
BAILEY said "the American for more than a year in a:
people are deeply concerned" of Indochina and last w
about the plight of the helpless sent representatives to
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inter-
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Making your mark in business used to mean
carving a comfortable niche for yourself and stay-
ing there. Promotion was simply a matter of time,
provided you could spend 20 years in the process.
But, today, business depends on technology. Tech-
nology that can't wait a moment if it's going to keep
pace with what's happening.
That's why, at Kodak, our basic reliance on sci-
entific research makes the need for creative young
minds more demanding than ever. We must have
people with drive and ambition, impatient to put
what they've learned into practice. People who get
all the freedom and responsibility they can handle,

helps to identify unknown substances. The woman
on the right has a dual background in gas chroma-
tography and trace metal analysis, which she's ap-
plied to analyzing pollution in rivers and streams.
They came up with new problems while solving
some of our old ones. But they've uncovered some
promising answers, too. As they continue their re-
search, you may read about them again. The oldest
is just over 30.
Why do we give young men and women so
much room to test their ideas? Because good ideas-
often lead to better products. Which are good for
business. And we're in business to make a profit.

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