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April 12, 1975 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-12

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, April 12, 1975

...T M.GD L

_. / .._

Scholars' praises
sung at ceremony
By TIM SCHICK
Suits came out of mothballs, dresses out of the closet, ties
came off the rack, shoes were shined, and hair was neatly
combed.
The high society of the academic community, joined by their
parents, filed up the steps of Hill Auditorium for the Honors Con-
vocation.
INSIDE the auditorium, liberally decorated with flowers, the
best and the brightest shone with collective pride as they listened
to their praises being sung.
The names of all-A students were called, and the Glee Club
serenaded the audience with "Laudes Atque Carmina" loosely
translated by University Vice President for State Relations Rich-
ard Kennedy as "Go Michigan, Beat Ohio State."
But it wasn't all roses. As the program proceeded inside,
two picketers protested outside. Carrying signs reading "Honor
our concerns, not our grades," and "Undergrads ground under
by 'U'," the pair sought to show that "We aren't all happy with
what the University does here."
FOR SOME, THE main point of the day was President Flem-
ing's address. Discussing the role of colleges in training the labor
force, Fleming explored the issue, but drew no conclusions.
SUNDAY at HILLEL
COMBINED BRUNCH
11 a.m.-75c
SPEAKER:
MRS. BARBARA NURENBERG
"Working With Russian Jewish
Immigrants in Detroit"
ISRAELI DANCING-12:30
DELI: 5:30-All you can eat $2.00
All at HILLEL
1429 HiLL ST.

U.S. evacuates Cambodia; fall expected Library
(Continued from Page 1) Rouge rebels were on thY door- fire within 48 hours. However, while visiting Paris for medical -which touched off wdese beset
ste oftheCabodan aptalsoucesin' g-Sta tesAmecan wrlaes ~e b se b
only yesterday killed an Ameri- ep of the Cambodian capital sources in the present cabinet treatment. campus unrest in thi UniteJ
can pilot, the escape was made they have completely surround- said no new government was States-American warpilottheecpplanesbe-|
by helicopters flying from the ed since January, creeping to contemplated. HE WAS deposed .y Mrhal p dg s
N.kinaw which was n station within four miles of downtown Massive American invilve- Lon Nol, who aligned himself jIthe Cambodian %overijment.

'U nt.1d ,, , Y111 I Y .11 U1 0~dL1111,
in the Gulf of Siam about 70 Phnom Penh and shelling its
miles from Phnom Penh. lifeline Pochentong airfietd at
will with rockets.
SHIPS accompanving the Oki_---. T D E E a k

ment on Cambodia beg- on
March 18, 1970, when Prince
Norodom Sihanouk, who had
tried to keep his country out of
the Indochina war by a strictly
neutral course, was overthrown

almost immediately with the
Americans.
After the brief Ame-ican and
South Vietnamese inarsin rito
Communist Cambodia border
sanctuaries of May-Ju'ie of 1970

3
i
J

nawa carry a total of 1,800 U.S. T
Marines. Cambodian government whose
troops were ceding more and
The evacuees were to be more ground to the rebaes had
flown to the U Tapao air base expressed dismay at Ford's
in neighboring Thailand, the failure to push for more mili-
State Department said, accord- tarv aid.
ing to previously made co'itin- "We are profoundly disap-
gency plans. pointed," a government stat-
The State Department ex- ment said. "We have noted that
pressed regret at having to or- President Ford is sunting his
der the evacuation, noting it had responsibiilty to press for aid
"obvious implications" for the to our people."
Cambodian government. The government appeared in
disarray as yet another last-
THE PULLOUT came a day minute cabinet shuffle was re-
atePUidento ae aedaported brewing. Sources in the
after President Ford delivered Democratic party said its lead-
a State of the World message er, Chau Sau, had been asked
to Congress in which he did not by Acting President Saukam
ask for any more miiltary aid Khoy to form a new govern-
to Cambodia, saying it "may ment.
be too late." IF HE accepts, the sources
The Communist - led Khmer said, he will call for a cease-

However, the bo)rnin mis-
sions were cut off 5y a war-j
weary Congress on Aig. !5,
1973, when the Camb.xtia.i army'
was already taking ievere oeat-
ings in the field.

(Continued from Page 1)
"The University libraries con-
stitiite the single most treasured
resowr-es," said Philosophy
Professor Carl Cohen, adding
"this intellectual resources has
to be protected."

Eviction blues hit tw

(Continued from Page 1)
THE TENANT had left his
apartment in shambles.
"It looked like he hadn't been
there for a month-or .;o," said
Raycean Garrett of the AAHC.
"He just tore it up-there was,
moldly bread all around, the
curtains were damaged, and the
floor was covered witn litter."
AN EVICTION does not come
in one fell swoop, acco:ding to
Deputy Charlie Stewart, the cf-
ficer who carries out all evic-
tion notices for the county. It
is actually a long and involved
legal process where, he added,
the landlord often "gets
pimped.,"
First, a seven day notice must
be given by a landlord, after
which the tenant is presented

him out of there," Stewart sa
BUT THE Deputy insists tl
he does all he can to avoid
eviction. "If there's someth
that can be done we'll da i
he maintains. "We sendt
tenant around to all the soc
services agencies-OEO (Off
of Economic Opportunity), Ca
olic Social Services, and so or
to try and find emergency ho
ing. If he can't, there's noth

aid.
hat-
an
ing
t,"
the
-ial
ice
ith-

.5.. m ilies! EARLIER this week, Downes,
o fa mi h es at the request of Cohenspoke
at a meeting with the faculty to
dramatize the labraries' finan-
that. If the tenant won't move cial plight.
his o w n stuff, that's the Cohen claims: "There Is gen-
breaks." He asserted that there eral concern for the matter, but
are no legal provisions to mo- many members of the faculty
vide storage space for those do not see the rising cost prob-
possessions. lems."
Cohen said he is uncertain of
CARL PRYOR, resident man- any efforts on the part of the
ager of Chatham Apartmrints, faculty to put pressure on the
was unsympathetic. When asked j administration to help control

we can do."
Local authorities
ligation to protect
tenant's personal
which are usually
the street.
Said Stewart, "I

feel nos
the evict
belongin
dumped
don't thi

FEDERALLY INSURED STUDENT LOANS
SPRING-SUMMER LOANS
Students wishinq to borrow through the University's Feder-
ally Insured Loan Proqramn during the Spring-Summer Term
should submit application materials by APRIL 15, 1975.
Fundinq is limited and priority will be given to those who
apply by April 15 and those who will qraduate in Auqust
or December 1975, or those for whom summer attendance
is a necessity.
For additional information contact the Guaranteed
Student Loan Office, 2503 S.A.B., or call 763-4127.

I

with a 30 day notice to quit the
residence by the court. If the
tenant still refuses to leave thea
premises, the landlord must
again goto court for a summons,
another 20 day process. Then
Stewart serves a write of evic-
tion.I
"After another three days
have elapsed, I go in and get

we have any obligation to
Insurg
cii ne
(Continued from Page 1)
The Saigon military comma
sail 243 Communit-led troo
were killed by infantrvme
tanks and airstrikes near t
town of Ben Tranh, 30 mil
southwest of Saigon.
Also being followed for sig
of a new squeeze on Saig
were reports of heightened a
tivity in the Mekong Delta
the south of the tense capita

n- how he felt about leaving the the problem.
us- belongings of two famiiles out '"WE don't see any more mon-
ing in the street, he snapped, ey coming for anything," said
"There's the door. Hit it!" Edward Dougherty, assistant to
ob- But the belongings of he Vice President for Academic
ted e v i c t e d Chatham Apartmnt. Affairs Frank Rhodes. "The li-
gs, tenants were dumped on the brary service is very high prior-
on street and local residents corn- ity in needs, but it will be
mented that most of the valu- weighed in relationship with fill-
ink able items weresremoved with- ing faculty vacancies and con-
do in the first 24 hours. tinuations of various University
-~______ -___prog rams."
IGovernor Milliken has recom-
mended an additional two per
ents hellDougherty was uncertain what
0 effect this would have on the li-
braries.
ar Sctgonon the cut and we don't know
"We do not have precise word
Wnshinoton.hw we're going to handle it,"
nd Honefullv others wold go to he said.
fps France, Australia and Canada, Further cutbacks could mean
n, they said. personnel cuts and shortening
he In Washington a presidential of service hours, but Downes
es snokesnan vehemently denied said, "That's the last thing we
e er mthtere e want to do . . . We'd do almost
aainesterda that there were anything else.

# so

on
ac-
to
1 1

any secret commitments mane
to the South Vietnamese and
that anyone who charges there
are should back it up with evi-
dance.

t
:
{
Y

THERE HAS been an increase "I have not seen or heard
of Communist-led activity in the s"wh evidence." declared Press
rice rich delta over the nast Se rtary Ron Nessen as he'
week, but most of it has been "o".ht to ont to rest charges by
scattered shelling attacks. Yes- Sen. Henry Jackson. (D-Wash.),
terday, sources said, street that there were secret agree-
fqhting broke ost in the district rments made to gnt South Viet-
town of Thu Thua, 20 miles namn to agree to the Paris ac-
southwest of Saigon. Ben Tranh, cords.
another district down 10 miles M E A N W H I L E a Pro-
farther southwest, also was re- visional Revolutionary Govern-
nnrted under heavy pressure. ment (PRG) radio broadcast
Fears have been exoressed called for the civilian ponulation
here that the stepoed up activ- and armed forces in "western
itv in the delta might herald an South Vietnam" to rise up and
effort to close a circle around seize full control of their areas.
Saigon and also might be an at- "This is about the time the!
temnt to cut roads now used to Thieu and U. S. governments
nrovide the capital with much will receive the decisive at-
of its food supplies. tacks," the broadcast asserted.
Mme. Nguyen Thi Binh, for-
IN OTHER Indochina develop- eign minister of the PRG, said:
ments: in an interview that Thieu is
The bulk of the 150,000 to "the major obstacle to imple-{
200;000 South Vietnamese who mentation of the Paris agree-'
would be evacuated to avoid ment" and his government must'
reprisals would come to the be replaced by one committed
United States if time permits, to "peace, reconciliation and na- ;
according to U. S. authorities in tional accord."t

PFresi~dent
ie
asks for
more aid
to Saigon
(Continued from Page 1)
Soutth Vietnam.
In the House, several fresh-
men congressmen drafted a
resolution urging Ford to evaz-
nate all Americans within seven
days.
S E N A T E Majority Leader
Mike Mansfield (D-Mont.) call-
ed a caucus of Senate Demo-
crats for Monday afternoon to
discuss the aid and legal ques-
tions. The caucus previously
voted overwhelmingly agai ast
any further military assistance
to South Vietnam or Cambodia.
THE UNITED States sent a
note to Hanoi warning North
Vietnam "it should have no
doubt that it will be held re-
sponsible" unless a cease-fire
is agreed to immediately.
The note talked of the high
hopes held in the wake of the
1973 Paris accords and noted:
"Tragically, these hopes and
expectations have been shat-
tered by the Democratic Re-
public of Vietnam's (North Viet-
narn) total violation of these
accords."

For years we've been telling you that in Milwaukee,
beer capital of the world, Pabst Blue Ribbon
s the overwhelming favorite..

Women's Studies Program
PRESENTS
Florynce Kennedy
New York attorney and founder, Feminist Party
AN INFORMAL DISCUSSION OF FEMINISM
AND THE WOMEN'S MOVEMENT

3
I
r
d
s
I'
3
I
e
t l'
,p
In
'a

Saturday, Ar
Rackham,

pril 12 at 2 p.m.
Assembly Hall

11

rThe
N

'ii

6

£SE cOntinues!

CANS

1975

1975

1974 11973

PABST 53% 48% 42%
BRAND 2 12% 11% 18%
BRAND 3 5% 5% 7%
BRAND 4 5% 5% 5%

PABST 46% 46% 43%
BRAND 2 10% 9% 11%
BRAND 3 8% 7% 8%
BRAND 4 6% 9% 10%

I
i
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MICHAEL WHITE'S
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GO WITH THE FLOW/THE LADY SIRRO
HER /IN THE SILENCE (LISTEN)
MOONDUST SHUFFLE
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SPACESLIDE
liupsc

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SOURCE: Milwaukee Journal Consumer Analysis

- . I

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And Pabst must be doing just that. Look at

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1 t' I F Y _ v i I 'CT r\'i a

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