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April 11, 1975 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-11

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Friday, April 11, 1975
HEARST CASE
Special grand jury
questions S hinnick

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

74 campaign
funds revealed

SAN FRANCISCO (-) - For-
mer Olympic long jumper Phil-
lip Shinnick went before a spe-
cial grand jury probing the Pa-
tricia Hearst case yesterday af-
ter announcing he would refuse
to answer questions.
Shinnick was the latest radi-
cal sports figure to be quizzed
in the investigation of the fugi-
tive newspaper heiress and the
Symbionese Liberation Army.
His decision to remain silent
parallels the stand advocated by
his friends Jack and Micki
Scott.
T H E SCOTTS emerged
Wednesday from hiding, with
their side. They told. reporters
they would not answer ques-
tions about the Hearst case.
They said the U. S. govern-
ment is "morally bankrupt"
and added, "We believe a posi-
tion of total noncollaboration
with this government is our
moral responsibility."
Walton, of the Portland Trail-
blazers of the National Basket-
ball Association, said he was
sorry he had spoken with the
FBI and "you can rest assured
that I will never talk to the
enemy again."
James Larson, Shinnick's law-
yer, said tine onetime Olympic
long jumper "had already de-
cided that he's not going to ans-
wer any questions."
SCOTr SAID she and her hus-
band went into hiding because1

they had fears of being "gun-
ned down by some trigger-hap-
py agent."
The Scotts dropped from
sight more than a month ago
after they were linked to
Hearst, 21, the daughter of Ran-
dolph Hearst, president and edi-
tor. of the San Francisco Exam-
iner.
She was kidnaped on Feb. 4,
1974, by the Symbionese Liber-
ation Army (SLA). She later
allegedly joined her captors.
"From the moment she was
kidnaped, her life was threat-
ened because the FBI was itch-
ing for a shootout with the
SLA," Scott said during a
news conference at which the
Scotts refused to answer ques-
tions.
SIX MEMBERS of the SLA
were killed in a blazing shoot-!
out with Los Angeles police in
May 1974. Hearst and William
and Emily Harris are believed
to be the only mebmers of the
terrorist group still at large.
The Scotts did not mention
the Pennsylvania farmhouse
they reportedly rented last
summer -ra spot pinpointed as
a possible hideout of the fugi-
tive heiress.,
"Our actions of the past year
are completely defensible," said
Ms. Scott. "If we somehow
acted to avert bloodshed and
killing, we certainly find noth-
ing to apologize for or be
ashamed of."

WASHINGTON (A') - In the
last of the free-wheeling, big-
spending elections, candidates
for House and Senate seats used
almost $74 million in their cam-
paigns last year, Common
Cause reported yesterday.
The Common Cause survey
says this much was spent by
1,161 candidates for Congress
who ran in the 1974 general elec-
tions. The figures cover pri-
maries, runoffs and general
elections.
THIS WAS the last major
campaign before the new cam-
paign reform law took effect
on Jan. 1.
Democrats spent $38.4 mil-
lion in House and Senate races
with candidates for both major
parties running. Republicans
spent $32.5 million in the same
races.
Another $1.7 million was re-
ported by one Republican and
63 Democratic incumbents who
did not have major party chal-
lengers in the general election.
COMMON C A U S E, a
citizens' group that monitors
campaign spending, said Dem-
ocratic incumbents outspent Re-
publican challengers by an av-
erage of more than two to one.
Republican incumbents op-
posed by Democrats in House
and Senate races outspent their
challengers by a margin of

ey they could use in their cam-
paigns.
UNDER THE new law now in'
effect, each House candidate
may spend only $70,000 in a
general election, plus $14,000 for
fund raising, although state and
national party organizations
may spend $10,000 each on his
behalf. He may spend an equal
amount in the primary.
Senate candidates now may
spend only two cents per each
person of voting age in the
stateor $175,000, whichever is
greater, in both primaries and
general elections. They also are
allowed more for fund raising
expenses, and help worth $10,-
000 each from the state and na-
tional parties.

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CONNALLY TRIAL:
Govt. rests case

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Fri., April 11

Anesthesiologists
interrupt surgfery

MANSFIELD, Ohio (WP) -
Elective surgery in this city's
two hospitals was canceled for
the second consecutive day yes-
terday because seven anesthe-
siologists cannot get what they
consider adequate malpractice
insurance.
They are refusing to partici-
pate, in all but emergency oper-
ations after an old, larger in-
surance policy expired earlier
this week.
THE TWO hospitals, Mans-
field General and People's con-
tinued normal operations ex-
cept for surgery. Fifty-five op-
erations -have been canceled. A
patient suffering appendicitis
was transferred to another hos-
pital for an operation.
"If this continues we are in
deep trouble," said Phillip Wis-
dom,administrator at General
Hospital, a 450-bed facility.
Doctors in the Mansfield area,
a city of 55,000 in central Ohio,
met yesterday with hospital ad-
ministrators in an attempt to
solve the crisis. Officials from

the state Department of Insur-
ance also looked for sources of
increased coverage for the phy-
sicians..
WISDOM said admissions,
normally 60 a day, dropped in
half. One 25-bed .wing is closed
and 13 surgical employes given
voluntary time off. Other staff
members are being urged to
take vacations.
At People's, with 225 beds, ad-
ministrator Joseph Damoff said
personnel are being asked to
take vacation or work half days
to spread the duties. Admissions
are down by one-quarter, he
said.
The seven anesthesiologists
are members of Anesthesia As-
sociates of Mansfield. T h e
group's malpractice insurance
policy expired at midnight
Tuesday.
Since then, the group has
managed to get $300,000 worth
of insurance for $50,000-a-year.
Under its old policy, the group
paid $35,000-a-year for $2 mil-
lion coverage.

WASHINGTON OP) - The gov- show that all 280 bills could three to two.
ernment trested its case yester- have been in circulation on Oct. While candidates for federal'
day in the John Connolly brib- 29, 1973. That's the date Jacob- office in last year's elections
ery trial. sen swears former Treasury' had to report their fund rais-
Prosecutors called a total of Secretary Connally handed him ing and expenditures, there
36 witnesses before resting their the money, stuffed into a cigar was no limit on how much mon-
case in the seventh day of the box, as cover-up cash intended-
trial. Only one of the witnesses to replace the $10,000 Jacobsen -
testified that Connally took the says he gave Connally as a
two $$5,000 payoffs he is accus- bribe 2 years earlier.
ed of accepting. CONNALLY is charged with '
ALL THE other witnesses accepting the money for sup-LX RIOU N 4 JUMB Et
gave testimony or authenticat- porting higher dairy price sup- To F R A N KF U R T
ed documents to present what portlevels.
the prosecutors hope will be a None of the witnesses con- 329eroup Charter are Only
mass of circumstantial evidence tradicted Jacobsen's story about . __.9 7 7nI39 .
supporting the story of their the alleged cover-up cash. -
star witness, Jake Jacobsen. But Donald White of the Fed- 1 May June 19 March 26
The prosecutors questioned eral Reserve Bank in Kansas 3 June16 July24 April 12
Federal Reserve bankers to City testified that two of the 4 June30 July31 April27
THE MECiIIGAN DAi y bills were in government hands 5 July21 Sept.4 May17
Volume iXXXVNa. 153 just 20 days before Jacobsen 6 July28 Aug.28 May24
Friday, April 11, 1975 says he got them from Connally. 7 Aug.11 Sept.2 June 7
is edited and managed by students White said that both of the I-7-177,71 7+"," 7
at the University of Michigan. News $20 bills were shipped to the ; Yu.,.Chrtegne
phone 764-0562 second class 1)(tae Federal Reserve branch in Ok- , 4,., ,.. I,2 1
paid at Ann Arbor. Michigan 48106 ' 36euISr~,Dtot 182 e.05,11 {""
Published d a 1l y Tuesday through' lahoma City, Oct. 9, 1973. He Send me detailed information. MU
Sunday morning during the Univer- testified that there are no re- NAME__
sity year at 420 Maynard Street. Ann cords showing what happened - -
Arbor. Michigan 48104. Subscript n o rd hwngwa apee
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area): to them after that. ... ----.----.
$11 local mail( Michigan and Ohio);---
$12 non-local mall (other states and
foreign).
Su.-nmer session published Tues- Shocking Realities of World-Wide Starvation
daytroughaturdaymorning.2 Provocative, Enlightening Documentaries:
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carriert
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