100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 06, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, April 6, 1975

SPIRITUAL. COMMUNITY OF THE SUN
PRESENTS
DICK VGREGOY
* Speakinq on the food crisis and survival of humanity *
FRI., MAY 16, 1975-7:00 P.M.
UNIV. OF MICH. BALLROOM
Donation $4 plus I can of food
profits ao to world community food bank
ann arbor, mi
GET TICKET in ADVANCE of show!
Available at David's Bookstore-529 E. Liberty
and n the Michiaan Union

Kosher Meat Co-op
Important Meeting
Sunday, April 6
Noon at Hillel
Ordering and
Discussing
of Future Plans

Elections for LS & A
Student Government Positions (1915-16)
Will Be Held Friday, April 18, 1975
Any registered LS & A student wishing to run as a candidate
must file an application with the LS & A Student Government
Office, 4001 Michigan Union, no later than 5 p.m., April 10,
1975.
* POSITIONS AVAILABLE INCLUDE:
PRESIDENT, VICE PRESIDENT, as well as 7 full year and 3 half year
REPRESENTATIVES
* Applications available at LSA-SG office, 4001 Michigan Uniorn
0 Candidates meeting to be held 5 p.m. April 10 at LS & A-SG office

DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
(Continued from Page
GESTALT WORKSHOP for pe
workers April 11-13. $25.00. For
formation call Michael Asidesr
2801) or Catherine Lilly 994-5
f ~00:
TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITAT
Wednesday, 2:00 1& 8:00, Mich
League, rd floor. 21
TAKE A vacation twice daily. Ti
scendental Meditation-761-822:
22-
TOURNAMENT- Pinball. Foos
State Championship.
Inquire at:
CAMPUS PINBAT L
1217 South Universit
REGENCY
TRAVEL
601 E. WILLIAM
ANN ARBOR 48104
665-6122
SPECIALIZING

F"

(Continued from Page 1) cu]mination of three days of
THE TWENTY children rumor, speculation, and con-
"range in age from about 4% fusion regarding their status.
71 to 12 years, with about six or State and private agencies, ac-'
eight of them two years old and cording to Evans, have been
under," Evans added. deluged with calls since early
aople- in the week from parents wish-
r 662- "TIE placement parents ing to adopt the orphaned chil-
492). have been notified," said Ev- dren.
)F406 ans, "and will be waiting at The Michigan orphans are
the reception center to take part of an initial group of over
ION these children home." 400 who arrived in Seattle late
F409 Evans emphasized that these Saturday night on a chartered
placements are only temporary, Pan American 747 jumbo jet.
ran- and that permanent homes for The cost of the flight from
F408 the children is not the major Saigon to Seattle, over $200,000,
concern right now. was covered by Holt Interna-
sha11. "We're not even thinking tional Children's Services of Eu-'
about adoption yet," said gene, Oregon. The organization
Evans. "We just want to get will find temporary homes for:
these kids off the planes and half of the children in the Seat-
into homes." tle area and fly the rest to

(Continued from Page 1)
32 hour limit observing, "The
other regular courses are not
necessarily better for the stu-
'e it I 'olved."
However, Carduner defended
the limit, "Thirty two hours is
still one fourth of the total credit'
hours and it's really not bad.'
The reasoning is that it's prob-
ably desirable for students to
have as mixed experience as
possible."

^xperimental courses as "ones
in which the main work takes
place in a setting other than a
University classroom, labora-
tory, library or studio, and in
which the experience is directly
related to an academic disci-
It clamped down on students
who have received credit for
loosely supervised work, charg-
ing each department to appoint
a body in charge of monitoring

Orphans arrive today

LSA limits options

Zoology Prrf. David Shappirio the number and nature of ex-
agreed, explaining, "Independ- periential credit and to report
ent study of one form or another to the Curriculum Committee
is a valuable experience. How- each year.
ever, independent study doesn't The resolution, if approved by
cover the whole of education." the Executive Committee and

the LSA faculty, would lhmit
experiential credit to 15 hours.

TiE COMMITTEE defined

E9
a

families waiting in Chicago and
THE orphans arrival is the New York.

U.S. policies stable

s - r _ _0

in business interview trips
MAKE YOUR HOLIDAY
TRIP HOME
RESERVATIONS NOW
ARBOR INSTANT
PRINTING
214 S. 4th Ave. 994-4664
HOw TO PASS EXAMS. $2.00.-
Swank,. 657Y' Willahar Dr., Wash-
ingtonCH. OH 43160. 1F411
WHY WALK F'ARTHER?
Get tour Levi's c:fea flf' at
WILD'S VARSIrY SfiOP

Cartoonis
(Continued from Page 1)
sandy - haired, athletic looking.E
He often antagonized last
night's audience with views that
clash with enlightened student
crowds. He drew hisses when'
he described one woman in the'
audience as "built like Raquel
Welch."
SANDERS said he was more*
involved with important politi-
cal and social issues than with
humor. His cartoons, Sanders
explained, "sought to get an:
editorial m e s s a g e across
through the use of familiar'
symbols. "
Rodriques, however, was the

ts cut up
consummate comedian,
made it clear he would do

thing for a laugh, insulting ev-
eryone from the emcee to his
mother. He pulled out a photo-
graph of a man shooting up
with a needle, quipping, "This
is how I get the inspiration for
my cartoons." Rordigues show-
ed some of his grotesque work.
Handicapped people standing
at urinals, people with their
bottom halves missing, and oth-,
er unfortunates all wearing be-
wildered, sad expressions on
their faces, make up Rodrigues'
cast of pathetic characters.
However, Rodrigues warned
the audience not to take him
too seriously. "His grotesque
characters," he said, "grow
out of his own physical attri-
butes."

who
any-

(Continued from Page 1)
"There is instability in South
Korea as well," Whiting pointed
out. Certainly under these cir-
cumstances up-ending the Tai-
wan domino would have reper-
cussions in Korea which Ford
would never risk."
LAST week some 8,000 Uni-
versity students in Seoul, South
Korea violently demonstrated
against the U.S.-supported gov-
ernment there.
However Whiting said, "If it
had not been for the events of
Indochina the political situation
in Taiwan would change in view,
of Chiang's death." He added,
those predicting attitudes in
Washington, Peking, and Tai-
wan "have not linked Indo-
china to Taiwan and failed to1
reassess the situation."
Whiting predicted Premier +
Chiang Ching-kuo, the former +

president's son, "will be Tai-
wan's new leader, he has ef-
fective power and is very visi-
ble to thr people. Every single
day Ching-kuo travels all-over
the island."
FORMER Vice President C.K.
Yen, who succeeded Chiang last
night, will become a figurehead
according to Whiting. "I expect
an orderly transition of pow-
er," Whiting declared and re-
ported, "Everything is very
calm here, businesses are oper-
ating as usual."
Ironically, yesterday was an
important Chinese holiday -
Grave Sweeping Day - where
the people gather the family
together and worship their an-
cestors. Taiwan trains were
filled with people travelling to
their home towns when the
news broke out of Chiang's
death.

+

Use Daily Classifieds

-1it-

Hereare

01

T

E

LA

.

reasonbe phypue
whoth nk"A~is
highly unre sonub e

1

Vote YES Monday
on Voter Registration
because the amendment:

G
I

" encourages
to register

people

and

vote.

9 establishes

a stable

Richard Caldwell, President
Ann Arbor Board of Realtors

James E. Stephenson Letty M. Wickliffe, Chairperson
Mayor City of Ann Arbor North Central Property
Owners Association

F. Ray Gilbert
Business Representative
Carpenters Local Union #512

Fred Veigel
President AFL-CIO Council

Dr. Karl G. Pearson, Professor of
Business Administration, Director
of Real Estate Education

Hichard L. Butcher
President Chamber of Commerce

Dr. raul vv. IvIctracKen, Protessor
of Business Administration,
U. of M.

city policy on
registration.
" prevents manipulation
of registration by
politicians.
* has been successfully
used in other cities
and states.
" has been endorsed by
the Democratic and
Human Rights parties,
plus candidates from
all three local parties.

Charter Amendment "A" contains
many ill-considered proposals
- proposals that can hurt many
people while helping virtually
no one.
"A" would discourage the reno-
vation and modernization of
rental properties as well as
the building of new ones.
Thus, it threatens jobs in one
of Ann Arbor's most basic
industries: Construction.

"A" could hurt renters - rather
than help them - because it coi
lead to a diminishing supply of
apartments in Ann Arbor.
"A" could hurt homeowners b
causing unnecessary new tax
burdens.
,4s cf rZ

And, most importantly,
uld the legislation is not needed.
According to the "Blue Ribbon
Commission on Rent Control"
y formed by former Mayor Harris,
"A general rent-control policy
(in Ann Arbor) is unwarranted."
Clearly, Charter Amendment "A"
is a bad idea. We urge you to
Vote "No" on "A" on April 7.
"A" has a sneaky
neardyeverody,

-V'.

Vote

Tom orro-

/ -', .

let- you

.

'5

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan